Garcia 'sad' to miss Masters after positive coronavirus test

By Sports Desk November 09, 2020

Sergio Garcia has revealed his sadness at having to withdraw from this year's Masters after he tested positive for COVID-19.

The 40-year-old Spaniard had been due to participate in the delayed event but will now spend the tournament in a period of self-isolation instead.

Garcia, who won the Masters three years ago, experienced symptoms on the journey back to his home in Austin following the conclusion of the Houston Open last weekend and a subsequent test came back positive.

"On Saturday night after driving back from the Houston Open, I started feeling a bit of a sore throat and a cough," Garcia said in a message posted on his Twitter account.

"The symptoms stayed with me on Sunday morning so I decided to get tested for COVID-19 and so did my wife Angela. Thankfully she tested negative, but I didn’t.

"After 21 years of not missing a Major Championship, I will sadly miss the Masters this week. The important thing is that my family and I are feeling good. We’ll come back stronger and give the green jacket a go next April."

A statement from organisers added: "Sergio Garcia has informed Augusta National Golf Club that he will not participate in the 2020 Masters tournament due to a positive COVID-19 test result."

Garcia is the second player to pull out of the tournament due to the virus, with Joaquin Neimann of Chile withdrawing after a positive test last weekend.

The Masters will be held at Augusta National Golf Club from November 12-15.

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