Presidents Cup 2019: USA chasing eighth straight title, Internationals bidding to end drought

By Sports Desk December 14, 2019

There is plenty on the line as the United States and the International team go head-to-head on the final day of the Presidents Cup.

The USA are eyeing their eighth consecutive Presidents Cup title, but the defending champions must overturn a 10-8 deficit in Sunday's singles in Melbourne, where fans are queuing up in large numbers at Royal Melbourne Golf Club.

No team have trailed after three sessions and won the Presidents Cup, with Ernie Els' Internationals - leading since the opening day - looking to clinch their first crown since 1998 - a triumph also in Melbourne 21 years ago.

After the Internationals managed to preserve their lead in a dramatic finish to Saturday's foursomes, USA captain Tiger Woods has returned for the singles.

Woods sat out both sessions on Saturday - the four-ball and foursomes - but the 15-time major champion is back with club in hand against Abraham Ancer in the opening match.

It could be a historic day for Woods, who can set the record for most matches won at the Presidents Cup, having tied Phil Mickelson's tally of 26 on Friday.

Meanwhile, controversial American Patrick Reed is without caddie Kessler Karain for the third match against C.T. Pan following a fan altercation on Saturday.

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