Jamaican Olympian Shevon Nieto honoured with IOC President's Award

By July 30, 2020

Two-time Jamaican Olympian Shevon Nieto has been awarded the IOC President’s Award for honouring the fight and path of an Olympian.

Shevon recently competed on America’s Got Talent singing her original song Through the Good and the Bad to much acclaim. The story of she and her husband Jamie Nieto’s triumph over adversity after he injured his spine in an accident four years ago touched many across the globe.

Shevon, who is pregnant with the couple’s first child, expressed her gratitude to the IOC president Thomas Bach.

“Thank you to the Olympic Committee and President Thomas Bach for awarding me with the President’s Award and honouring the fight and path of an Olympian. Also, thank you to my husband Jamie Nieto for bringing out the best in me,” she said.

“Before you become an Olympian, you’re someone with a dream. Someone who believes, despite what anyone says or how small the odds are, that they can achieve their goal at being one of the world’s best.

“This task takes courage, determination, resilience, and an endless measure of fortitude.  Achieving this accomplishment has helped to shape my life not only as an athlete but also as a person. This journey has prepared me for the most important race, which is life’s race.  So remember this, it’s not about whether you win or lose, it’s about the lessons learned and the fight that truly makes you a champion.”

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Related items

  • Students, coaches, relieved as US backtracks on International Student Policy Students, coaches, relieved as US backtracks on International Student Policy

    Caribbean student-athletes and coaches are breathing a collective a sigh of relief following the decision by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to rescind a policy directive that would have forced them to leave the country if their universities moved their classes online because of the Covid19 pandemic.

  • Reed: Fans are what makes the Ryder Cup Reed: Fans are what makes the Ryder Cup

    Patrick Reed is in full support of the decision taken to delay the Ryder Cup, insisting the presence of fans will make it "even sweeter" when the event takes place in 2021.

    Due to the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Ryder Cup organisers announced this week that the 2020 edition will be pushed back 12 months.

    The United States will have home advantage next September when Europe travels to defend the trophy at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin, with the action unfolding between September 24-26.

    While the PGA Tour has returned behind closed doors, Reed believes the Ryder Cup would not be the same if played out without a packed crowd at the course, as their presence brings out the emotion in the players.

    The 29-year-old has experienced both sides of the occasion, too. He has lost twice on European soil, including in 2018 at Le Golf National, but was also a member of the USA team that triumphed in 2016 under the captaincy of Davis Love III.

    Speaking after his opening round at the Workday Charity Open, Reed said: "I think probably if you asked everybody - captains, assistant captains, players, both organisations - that they're disappointed, obviously, that we're not going to play Ryder Cup this year, but at the end of the day I feel like they made the right call.

    "The Ryder Cup is not the same if you have it at 50 per cent fans or if you have it at no fans. The fans are kind of what makes the Ryder Cup.

    "You go in there and you - if you're the home team, you have everyone behind you, and if you're away, you want the hostility, you want people to kind of go at you. That's the fun thing about the event.

    "So with either cutting fans back or not having them at all, I also don't think you'll get as much emotion out of players, and with that being said, I feel like it just wouldn't be a Ryder Cup.

    "I mean, they made the right decision, and it's just going to be even sweeter whenever we're able to play next year."

    The Ryder Cup will continue to take place in odd-numbers years in the future, with the 2023 tournament to be held in Italy.

  • Ryder Cup will be cancelled if event cannot be held in 2021 Ryder Cup will be cancelled if event cannot be held in 2021

    The postponed Ryder Cup must take place in 2021 at Whistling Straits or it will be cancelled altogether, the CEO of the PGA Seth Waugh has said.

    It was confirmed on Wednesday that the United States and defending champions Europe will not compete in the prestigious event this September as planned.

    Players had expressed reservations about playing the 43rd edition of the competition without fans present and the lingering impact of the coronavirus pandemic forced the hands of the PGA and European Tour.

    However, if circumstances next year mean the Ryder Cup cannot take place in front of spectators on the new dates of September 21-26, then the likelihood is it will scrapped altogether.

    Asked what guarantees there were that it can be staged as normal next year, Waugh told reporters: "None, frankly.

    "We think that this is the right thing to do. I would bet on science is what I would say, personally, about the ability to figure out treatments, vacancies or protocols or safety given we have 15 months to do that.

    "But there frankly is no guarantee. I certainly wouldn't have thought on March 1 - certainly January 1 - that we'd be having this conversation right now.

    "I think this is the best possible decision. Frankly if we do get to this time next year and we can't responsibly hold it, it likely will result in a cancellation at that point.

    "I don't think we can perpetually roll things forward, that's not fair to the game, that's not fair to the Presidents Cup or anyone else. We're hopeful that we will hold it but all bets are off in terms of what's going on in the world.

    "If I were a betting man, I would bet on science to figure out how to truly reopen the world in 15 months' time."

    Waugh said he spoke to American captain Steve Stricker and Europe skipper Padraig Harrington on Tuesday evening and feels the decision has their backing.

    "I think they were relieved, happy," he added.

    "Steve, on his side, absolutely wants to have it – obviously it's a home game for him, in Wisconsin, he wants to have it in the way he's always dreamed of and it wasn't going to look like that.

    "Padraig, I think, different perspective, he's just worried about the safety of everybody travelling here and how difficult that would be.

    "I think they're disappointed that we're not able to do it because they build their tempos and those that are qualifying are excited about it, but I think there's relief in the certainty of knowing where we stand."

Popular Athletics News

Error: No articles to display

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.