England's Test win over Ireland at Lord's was not a fair contest between bat and ball due to a substandard Lord's playing surface, according to home captain Joe Root.

A demolition job by new-ball pair Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad saw Ireland bundled out for 38 on Friday, a day that began with the visitors dreaming of a historic maiden triumph in the longest format after being set 182 for victory.

England began in similar batting turmoil as they were dismissed for 85 in the first session of the match, with Ireland's seam attack led by the excellent Tim Murtagh wreaking havoc on a green pitch.

The five-match Ashes series against Australia begins at Edgbaston next week before the second Test comes to Lord's and Root seemingly challenged head groundsman Karl McDermott to up his game before that keenly anticipated clash.

"I don't like saying this, but the wicket was substandard for a Test match," Root told a post-match news conference.

"I thought it wasn't even close to a fair contest between bat and ball throughout the whole game.

"First innings, last innings, when you are getting scores like that, that tells a story in itself."

Asked whether he was preparing for similar pitches during an Ashes series expected to be dominated by two high-class seam attacks, Root replied: "I hope not.

"You have to find ways of coping with that. It was extreme in this game. From a batting point of view, it's hard to take too much out of it."

Although England rested World Cup heroes such as Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler for the Ireland match, Root conceded players like himself who stayed on for the quick change in formats were feeling "knackered".

"It's been 10 weeks of hard cricket, of high emotion, of ups and downs. It does take a lot out of you," he added.

"You have to suck it up and get on with it. It's not been perfect, but we've dealt with it pretty well.

"We've never been in a position where we've won a World Cup, so for half the side to be part of that and then very quickly adjust to Test cricket is unusual.

"You've never been in that position before, so it's hard to know how you're going to cope."

England seamers Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad tore through Ireland at Lord's on Friday to end a remarkable Test match where seam bowlers dominated.

Needing 182 for a historic maiden victory in cricket's longest format, Ireland were blown away as they subsided to 38 all out.

It meant England escaped with a remarkable win despite also failing to reach three figures in their first innings and needing nightwatchman Jack Leach to produce their most substantial batting contribution.

Whether it made for useful Ashes preparation is up for debate, but a Test played out in fast forward unquestionably made for compelling viewing.

 

A win without foundation

Before lunch was served on the first day, England's hopes of victory were in tatters. Playing on his home ground, Middlesex veteran Tim Murtagh earned himself a place on the fabled honours board with an imperious 5-13.

England's collapse to 85 all out was their lowest at home since Glenn McGrath's stunning 8-38 dismissed them for 77 at Lord's in 1997.

They escaped with a draw on that occasion and this win marks only the 13th time in Test history – and fifth since 1935 – that a team has managed to claim victory despite being dismissed for below 100 in their first innings.

Jack of all trades

Selected for his dependable left-arm spin, Jack Leach walked away with the man-of-the-match award after a diligently compiled 92 in the second innings gave some of his much-vaunted England colleagues a lesson in application at the crease.

Indeed, Leach's total was more than the 87 skipper Joe Root, Rory Burns, Joe Denly, Moeen Ali and the pair-bagging Jonny Bairstow could manage between them in the match. It was also only the second fifty in 2019 for an England Test opener.

England's out-of-sorts batsmen might be encouraged by Leach demonstrating how form can turn around at an unexpected moment. The highest score of his first-class career came after 19 innings without reaching double digits.

Wondrous Woakes loving Lord's 

Some observers believe two Tests every year at Lord's gives English cricket's HQ an unfair slice of the pie but, if Chris Woakes had his way, England would probably never play anywhere else.

The Warwickshire all-rounder put a lacklustre first-innings outing behind him to demolish Ireland with a masterful display of seam and swing. Woakes' eventual figures of 6-17 mean he has 24 Lord's wickets at an average of 9.75 – the third best of any seamer at a single venue.

For context, the 30-year-old's overall Test analysis is 78 wickets at 31.06. All three of his five-wicket hauls - along with one tally of 10 in a match - have come at Lord's, where he scored his maiden and so-far only Test century against India last August.

Irish dreams shattered

When captain Will Porterfield and James McCollum emerged to start the Ireland chase, victory and history appeared within reach.

But 15.4 brutal overs later it was all over. McCollum was the only visiting batsman to reach double figures second time around as Ireland posted the seventh-worst score in Test history and the lowest ever at Lord's.

Joe Root felt England gave a timely demonstration of their calm under pressure after blowing Ireland away at Lord's on Friday.

Set 182 for a historic maiden Test victory, the visitors crumbled to 38 all out – Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad sharing all 10 wickets in a masterful demonstration of seam and swing in helpful conditions.

It meant England's blushes were spared after a dismal 85 all out on the first morning left them staring at a humiliating defeat.

"I know that that was a lot of runs on this surface," Root said at the post-match presentation, before alluding to last year's dramatic win over India in similar circumstance at Edgbaston – the venue for next week's first Ashes Test against Australia.

"We've been in this position before, we found ourselves in a similar position at Edgbaston last year so we knew that we'd been able to manage a similar sort of scenario.

"I think it was important that we stayed calm, in control of what we wanted to do and asked the right questions - and that's exactly what we did."

Woakes' Test-best figures of 6-17 extended his phenomenal record at Lord's, while Broad's 4-19 wrought further torment upon the overmatched Ireland batting order.

"Both me and Woakesy would roll these conditions up today and take them everywhere with us," Broad told BBC Sport. "You fancy defending anything in these conditions.

"The biggest part of this match was us picking up 10 wickets on day one because if Ireland had got a huge lead that would have been it.

"A lot has happened in two and a half days!"

Ireland captain Will Porterfield called on his Test rookies to take lessons from an ultimately bruising experience that promised so much.

"It all happened pretty quickly - they exploited the overcast conditions," he said.

"All the dismissals were lbw, bowled or caught by slip or keeper - the exact dismissals a bowling side is looking for on that pitch in these conditions.

"It's a big learning curve for the lads."

Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad ripped through Ireland at Lord's to spare England from a humiliating Test defeat on the eve of the Ashes.

Woakes continued his superb record on the ground with 6-17 as the visitors were bundled out for a paltry 38 – the seventh-lowest completed innings score in Test history – and England won by 143 runs, despite collapsing to 85 all out themselves on the first morning.

The Warwickshire all-rounder now has three five-wicket hauls at Lord's, with 24 scalps overall at 9.75 at English cricket's HQ and his Friday spell served as a timely re-stating of his Ashes credentials, following a lacklustre first-innings outing.

Broad chipped in with 4-19 before Woakes uprooted Tim Murtagh's leg stump to wrap up a torturous 15.4 overs for Ireland on a day that had promised so much for the Test rookies.

Murtagh's mastery of helpful bowling conditions on day one put a first victory in the longest format at the third time of asking on the cards for Will Porterfield's side, and that remained the case when Stuart Thompson (3-44) bowled Olly Stone with the first ball of day three.

It meant England were 303 all out and the ultimately unchallenged victory target was 182.

The opening stand of 11 between Porterfield and James McCollum was Ireland's biggest, with a sharp catch behind from Jonny Bairstow off Woakes dismissing the captain to start the procession.

Porterfield's opposite number Joe Root claimed four slip catches, helping Broad see off first-innings half-centurion Andy Balbirnie and Woakes to dismiss McCollum – the only Irishman to reach double figures second time around.

McCollum's wicket was the first of three to go with the score on 24, as Broad pinned Kevin O'Brien plumb in front and Woakes successfully reviewed an lbw appeal against Gary Wilson.

By that time the dangerous Paul Stirling had departed bowled without scoring – his decision to aim a booming drive at Woakes a particularly foolhardy stroke in a match packed with them.

The tail offered scant resistance, with Woakes and Broad's brilliance bailing out their under-par batting colleagues and allowing England to head into their latest duel against Australia with blushes spared.

Pakistan seamer Mohammad Amir has retired from Test cricket at the age of 27.

The left-armer has played 36 Tests from his debut in July 2009 but, 10 years on, he has decided to quit his international career in the longest format.

Amir was handed a five-year ban and jailed in 2011 for his part in a spot-fixing scandal after bowling deliberate no-balls against England, returning to international action against New Zealand in January 2016.

He will focus on limited-overs matches and explained this was the reason for his early Test retirement.

"It has been an honour to represent Pakistan in the pinnacle and traditional format of the game," Amir said in a statement.

"I, however, have decided to move away from the longer version so I can concentrate on white-ball cricket.

"Playing for Pakistan remains my ultimate desire and objective, and I will try my best to be in the best physical shape to contribute in the team's upcoming challenges, including next year's T20 World Cup.

"It has not been an easy decision to make and I have been thinking about this for some time.

"But with the World Test Championship commencing shortly, and Pakistan boasting some very exciting young fast bowlers, it is appropriate that I call on my time in Test cricket so that the selectors can plan accordingly."

Pakistan Cricket Board managing director Wasim Khan added: "Amir has been one of the most exciting and talented left-arm fast bowlers in Test cricket in recent times.

"He overcame adversity as a young cricketer and came back stronger not only as a cricketer but also as a better human being.

"His skill, on the field, and his personality will be missed in the dressing room in the longer format.

"However, we respect his decision and look forward to him continuing to play an integral role in white ball cricket for Pakistan."

Amir claimed 119 wickets and scored 751 runs in his Test career, taking 6-44 in his best bowling innings against West Indies in 2017.

Pakistan will play their World Test Championship opener against Sri Lanka in October.

Duane Vermeulen described the opportunity to captain South Africa for the first time as an "unbelievable honour" and promised to lead by example.

Experienced number eight Vermeulen has been named skipper for the Springboks' mammoth Rugby Championship clash with New Zealand in Wellington on Saturday.

And while acknowledging he may not take the most vocal approach to captaincy, Vermeulen is confident he can fulfil the role well with the help of other senior men.

"Only a few players have had the honour of captaining the Springboks in the history of our game, so it is an unbelievable honour for me," Vermeulen told a news conference.

"There's a bit of emotion, but it's controlled emotion.

"The people who know me will tell you that I just love to play and that I am not one for big speeches. I think I lead by example and, from that point of view, it's the way I like to play the game.

"My role in the team still stays the same and we have a big leadership group, which is good for the team. On match days, there's a couple of us who talk on the field."

South Africa defeated the All Blacks at Westpac Stadium last year and Vermeulen added: "I think it will be a massive game with both sides ready to have a good go at each other."

New Zealand may have beaten Argentina by just four points last week but they head into the second round of the Rugby Championship as favourites to see off South Africa.

The Springboks won on their previous visit, although history is very much against them when it comes to away Tests against the All Blacks, with the 57-0 demolition of two years ago still fresh in their minds.

Australia could not handle Rassie Erasmus' men last week but will hope for more success against an Argentina side who have won just two of their past 15 Tests on their travels.

In fact, the Pumas will be bidding to win for only the second time on Australian soil since 1983.

Take a look at the pick of the Opta numbers ahead of round two...

 

Australia v Argentina

- Australia have won 16 of their most recent 18 games against Argentina, including a 45-34 win in their last encounter – the highest total score ever between the two nations.

- The Pumas have only beaten Australia once away from home since 1983 - a 23-19 win in Queensland last September.

- Argentina are on a losing streak of six games, including their past three matches on the road.

- Australia conceded 291 metres in round one, the fewest of any of the four teams and 183 metres lower than their game average from 2018.

- Jeronimo de la Fuente was the only player to make more than 10 carries and 10 tackles in round one (11 carries, 12 tackles).

New Zealand v South Africa

- New Zealand have won 12 of the past 14 Tests against South Africa - including a 32-30 victory last time out - and 22 of their most recent 25 against all opposition.

- The Springboks claimed a 36-34 win on their previous visit to New Zealand and will be hoping for back-to-back wins there for only the third time in their history, after 1937 and 2008-09.

- They have won three of their past four Tests but only triumphed twice in their most recent 12 away Rugby Championship matches.

- The All Blacks are just six points shy of becoming the first team in Test rugby history to reach 16,000 points. No other team has even gone beyond 14,000.

- Ngani Laumape gained 7.2 metres per carry in round one of this year's tournament, the most of any player to make at least 10 carries.

Mark Adair led the way as England failed to build on a strong morning session and finished day two of their Ashes warm-up Test against Ireland just 181 runs ahead on 303-9 at Lord's.

Having resumed play trailing by 122, England had erased the deficit by lunch thanks to excellent batting from Test debutant Jason Roy (72) and the superb Jack Leach, who scored 92 as nightwatchman, and they looked in a strong position at 171-1.

But Adair's dismissal of Leach midway through the afternoon session resulted in a middle-order collapse - Joe Denly (10) run out after a mix up with Joe Root before Jonny Bairstow headed back to the pavilion with a pair.

Moeen Ali fell shortly after tea, and though he had steadied the ship, captain Root (31) followed with an edge off Adair (3-66).

Sam Curran struck an impressive 37 from 29, including four boundaries and two sixes, to boost England's hopes, though he fell to Stuart Thompson before play was halted due to thunderstorms, with Ireland well in the hunt for a famous victory.

After a nervy start in which they lost Rory Burns (6), England settled - Leach hitting five boundaries from nine deliveries before sealing his half-century with a thick edge down to third man, while Roy - who was dismissed for five on Wednesday - crunched a four from a short delivery to bring up a 47-ball 50.

Gary Wilson handed Leach a reprieve when he put down what should have been a routine catch diving to his left following the break, though Thompson's superb delivery to Roy ended the partnership.

Eight runs shy of a maiden century, Leach was dropped for a second occasion, but his luck ran out three deliveries later when he edged to Adair at second slip.

Root's hesitation cost Denly his wicket, and England lost a second batsman in quick succession as Adair trapped Bairstow lbw.

Moeen edged behind to Wilson four overs after the restart, and Ireland's wicketkeeper then atoned for his earlier drop with another spectacular catch to send Root walking before Adair claimed a third wicket of the session when Woakes was caught in the slips.

Will Porterfield almost outdid Wilson when he leapt to try and take in a Curran drive one handed, though the Surrey man was out when he sliced a pull to a man in the deep, and despite some big blows by Stuart Broad, England finished the day knowing they faced a fight to avoid suffering a pre-Ashes loss.

England paceman Jofra Archer will play for Sussex in Friday's T20 Blast match against Surrey as he continues his recovery from injury before the Ashes.

The 24-year-old, one of the stars of England's Cricket World Cup triumph, has spent time recuperating in Barbados after suffering a side strain.

Archer has been tipped to make his Test debut against Australia when the Ashes gets under way at Edgbaston next Thursday.

He returned to England to watch Sussex beat Hampshire in the T20 Blast on Wednesday, and has been passed fit to take part in the match against Surrey after medical checks.

Archer claimed 20 wickets at the World Cup and bowled the Super Over in the final against New Zealand on July 14, when England triumphed courtesy of a higher boundary count.

Sussex are third in the South Group after two matches.

Brad Shields has left England's training camp in Italy after sustaining a foot injury, with Alex Dombrandt called up as his replacement.

The 28-year-old back row has damaged ligaments in his foot and has been sent home for further tests.

Harlequins' Dombrandt, who has enjoyed a standout first season as a professional and was named in a preliminary training squad last month, will fly out to join the rest of the group on Thursday.

Eddie Jones' men are spending 12 days in Treviso as part of their preparations for the World Cup, which gets underway in Japan in September.

England, who face Wales, Ireland and Italy in internationals before the start of the tournament, begin their campaign against Tonga in Sapporo on September 22.

Australia paceman Pat Cummins is relishing the prospect of an Ashes series in England this year after missing out on a Test appearance in 2015.

Cummins was a late replacement for the retiring Ryan Harris four years ago but was not involved as England claimed a 3-2 series triumph.

The 26-year-old played a pivotal role in 2017-18, though, taking 23 wickets in total and being named player of the match in the fifth Test as Australia won 4-0.

Ahead of 2019's opener at Edgbaston next Thursday, Cummins is looking forward to a taste of what he considers probably the biggest challenge international cricket has to offer.

"Being on that tour in 2015, I just remember being really excited," he said.

"It felt like I was close to playing a Test towards the end. I feel like that would have been a bonus.

"Just being over here is pretty exciting. After winning the last Ashes, this is the next thing to tick off, playing in an away series. It doesn't get much tougher than this.

Cummins claimed 5-24 in an intra-squad warm-up clash on Wednesday, just two weeks on from the defeat to hosts England in the World Cup semi-finals, and he is confident of having found some rhythm.

"I hadn't bowled a long spell for quite a while and trying to learn some of the nuances of bowling in Test matches," he said.

"That first spell I think I bowled seven [overs] It's kind of weird. You start off fresh and then after three or four [overs], you're hurting a little bit.

"You kind of find [rhythm] towards the end. So just those kinds of things, trying to bowl a few bouncers and get the pace up.

"There's probably not too many bowlers around the world who would say they prefer one-day cricket. I just find there's always something a little bit more in the wicket. I like the contest of bowling 20 overs in a day, trying to out-think batsmen."

England's dramatic batting collapse against Ireland at Lord's was "an embarrassment", according to former captain Michael Vaughan.

The hosts won the toss and captain Joe Root chose to bat, but England were all out for 85 before lunch and then allowed Ireland to post 207, meaning the visitors carry a 122-run lead into Thursday's second day.

Vaughan told the BBC: "There were some good balls but there was also some timid play and poor strokes. Let's be honest, it's an embarrassment - you're at the home of cricket, in a Test against Ireland and you're all out for 85, there is no other word to describe it."

It was a day to savour for Tim Murtagh, the Middlesex stalwart who took five for 13 on his county ground for Ireland, who were facing England in a Test match for the first time.

The 37-year-old became the newest name on the Lord's honours board for his achievement and London-born Murtagh told the BBC: "Growing up as a kid I was dreaming of being on that honours board, just not from the away dressing room - but I guess it makes it even more special.

"Even the old gits like me had a few nerves this morning. It was a special occasion for everyone and a dream come true for all the guys, no matter how old."

There was an England Test debut for Warwickshire fast bowler Olly Stone, who took 3-29 and suggested there were "a few tired bodies" in the home side's ranks, but added: "I don't think there was a World Cup hangover. We said to try and treat it like a World Cup final."

Stone said England's players were "calm" and "having a bit of a laugh" in the dressing room as wickets fell, rather than panicking.

"Tim bowled well, showed the length to bowl on this wicket. He just bowled well on the day and got a bit out of the pitch," Stone said to Sky Sports.

"I thought we bowled well. Especially after tea, we came back out, we said it was a big session for us, it could go either way, and I thought we pulled it back. We beat the bat quite a bit and we were a bit unlucky some of the edges didn't carry or we didn't quite take them."

Cricket World Cup champions England were given a pre-Ashes wake-up call at Lord's as a Tim Murtagh-inspired Ireland dismissed Joe Root's team for 85 before building up a 122-run lead.

Ten days after lifting their first major ODI trophy in a thrilling final against New Zealand, England were back at the home of cricket in the longest format for a one-off four-day Test against the Irish as part of preparations for the Ashes.

And Australia would have been buoyed by what they saw as Murtagh (5-13) and Mark Adair (3-32) ensured an England side featuring five of their World Cup-winning squad - including Test debutant Jason Roy (5) - were dismissed inside 24 overs.

All 10 Irish wickets also fell on a green-tinged surface, though a half-century from Andy Balbirnie (55), who put on 87 for the third wicket with Paul Stirling (36), left Ireland - all out for 207 - in a strong position in their first Test against England.

England won the toss and elected to bat, with Roy the latest opener handed a chance to impress after scoring 443 in seven World Cup innings, yet things quickly unravelled.

Roy was the first to fall when edging Murtagh to first slip from the 11th ball he faced, while Joe Denly was out lbw to Adair for 23, which turned out to be England's top score.

Rory Burns (6) nicked behind, Root (2) was out lbw following an Ireland review, and fellow World Cup winners Jonny Bairstow, Moeen Ali and Chris Woakes were all removed for ducks as England crashed to 43-7 and Middlesex's Murtagh got his name on the Lord's honours board at his home ground.

Sam Curran (18) and debutant Olly Stone (19) at least made sure England moved well past their lowest Test score of 45, though it was still a chastening morning.

Ireland, playing in just their third Test, were two down before moving beyond England's total as Curran (3-28) removed openers Will Porterfield and James McCollum.

However, Balbirnie, who made a pair on his debut in the longest format, showed scoring was possible, making 10 boundaries before Stone (3-29) uprooted his middle stump.

Ireland lost their final eight wickets for 75 - Stuart Broad (3-60) moving above Dale Steyn into seventh in the list of all-time Test wicket-takers in the process - before nightwatchman Jack Leach safely negoiated the one Murtagh over before stumps without scoring.

England's Ashes preparations quickly hit the rocks as they were incredibly all out for 85 against Ireland in a humiliating start to this week's Test.

Three Cricket World Cup heroes went for ducks, Jason Roy made just five on debut and captain Joe Root added only two as the stunned hosts failed to make it to lunch at Lord's.

Tim Murtagh took figures of 5-13, earning his place on the honours board, as Ireland made hay in their first Test at the home of cricket.

The remarkable scenes should offer serious encouragement to Australia, themselves and Australia A meanwhile struggling with the bat in Southampton.

England looked to have recovered from Roy's shaky start that saw him edge to Paul Stirling in the slips, but Joe Denly, top-scoring on 23, went lbw to Mark Adair (3-32) to spark an astonishing collapse.

Rory Burns was caught behind for six and Adair got Root lbw before a remarkable run of ducks for England's ODI stars.

Jonny Bairstow was superb in the World Cup but his stumps were destroyed by Murtagh, who trapped Chris Woakes lbw - the review going with the umpire's decision - two balls later in a stunning two-wicket maiden.

Moeen Ali was caught behind and suddenly England were forced to work hard to avoid their record-low Test score (45 against Australia in 1887), doing so with boundaries met with sarcastic cheers.

The home side's fortunes did not improve, though, as Boyd Rankin (2-5) got a nick from Stuart Broad, before Sam Curran sent the same man to James McCollum at short leg.

Olly Stone, another debutant, got to 19 before Adair skittled him and England's innings was cut embarrassingly short just before the end of the session.

"I'm not quite sure what's happened over the past two hours, to be honest," Murtagh told Sky Sports.

Jason Roy's first Test innings for England lasted just 11 balls as he went for five against Ireland on Wednesday.

The Surrey star earned a place in the Test side with his performances at the Cricket World Cup and, as in that triumphant tournament, started as an opener at Lord's.

But Roy, featuring alongside county colleague Rory Burns, made an underwhelming start to his international career in the longest format.

The South Africa-born batsman edged Tim Murtagh to Paul Stirling at first slip for the first wicket of the match, reducing England to 8-1 in the third over.

Roy, who will hope to remain in the side for the Ashes series against Australia next month, had already escaped two close shaves prior to his dismissal.

The 29-year-old almost played onto leg stump from Mark Adair and then, from the following delivery, saw a no-ball save him from lbw.

Roy has past experience of a rough start to life on the biggest stage, though, having gone for a first-ball duck on his ODI bow against New Zealand in 2015.

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