Mexico mourns as legend 'Don Nacho' dies at 103

By Sports Desk March 25, 2020

Ignacio Trelles Campos, who coached Mexico at three World Cups, has died at the age of 103.

Popularly known as 'Don Nacho', Trelles led Mexico in 117 international matches.

He coached Mexico in the 1958, 1962 and 1966 World Cup tournaments, FIFA said, and was also in charge of the team in the 1964 and 1968 Olympic football tournaments.

Trelles' death was announced by his former club Cruz Azul, whom he led to back-to-back Primera Division titles in 1978-79 and 1979-80.

In all, Trelles won seven Mexican league titles as a coach - a record - having also won three championships as a player.

His other coaching domestic title triumphs came with Marte de Morelos, Zacatepec and Toluca. Trelles took charge of 1,083 matches in the Primera Division.

On the World Cup stage, he was only able to enjoy one victory, when Mexico beat Czechoslovakia 3-1 in a group game at the 1962 finals, held in Chile.

Born on July 31, 1916, in Guadalajara, Trelles was remembered fondly on Wednesday.

Cruz Azul confirmed his death, announcing: "With great sadness, but likewise, pride in being part of this club, we would like to inform you that Don Ignacio Trelles was added to the 'Celestial Legends'."

The Mexican Football Federation said: "We join the grief that seizes the football family for the death of Ignacio Trelles, legend of Mexican soccer. Prompt condolences to family and friends. RIP."

CONCACAF, the confederation to which Mexico belongs, said: "Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of Ignacio Trelles, who made a huge contribution to football in Mexico."

Cruz Azul said Trelles would have a private funeral due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Related items

  • Robben, Marquez, Larsson and the stars who went back to retire at their first club Robben, Marquez, Larsson and the stars who went back to retire at their first club

    Arjen Robben's retirement lasted just a single season, as the Netherlands and Bayern Munich great announced on Saturday he is to return to boyhood club Groningen for the 2020-21 campaign.

    Robben, 36, brought an illustrious playing career to an end last July shortly after his 10-year spell with Bayern came to an end.

    Although at the time he was linked with a potential return to the team that gave him his professional debut, Robben - who suffered with numerous injury problems throughout his career - opted to retire.

    But now he looks set to return, not only to top-tier football, but at the place where it all began.

    In honour of Robben's return to his first club, we identified some other high-profile players who went to finish their careers back home.

    Juan Roman Riquelme - Argentinos Juniors

    Perhaps more synonymous with Boca Juniors, where he made his professional debut and also spent most of his final years, Riquelme also had a strong affinity with Argentinos Juniors. He came through the club's academy in the early-to-mid 1990s, before then finishing his immense career at Estadio Diego Maradona in 2014, having also played for Barcelona, Villarreal and Argentina. Although the iconic attacking midfielder appeared close to joining Paraguay's Cerro Porteno the following year, the move never materialised.

    Dirk Kuyt - Quick Boys

    Kuyt briefly came out of retirement two years ago to help Quick Boys, with whom he spent 13 years as a youth. Playing in the Derde Divisie Saturday league, Kuyt was already working as assistant at the time, but made himself available for selection during a striker shortage and he made three appearances. The former Netherlands and Liverpool forward had retired the year before following a second spell with Feyenoord, where he had made his initial breakthrough in the mid-2000s, his form at the time earning a move to Anfield.

    Rafael Marquez - Atlas

    One of Mexico's greatest players, Marquez's longevity at such a high level was nothing short of incredible, as he accumulated 147 international caps. After breaking into the Atlas team as a teenager having come through their academy, the elegant centre-back enjoyed a sparkling career in Europe, winning 14 titles across spells with Monaco and Barcelona. Time with New York Red Bulls, Leon and Hellas Verona followed, before a final two-year stint back at the Jalisco ended in 2018. Although plagued by off-field allegations towards the end of his career, Marquez went on to become the club's sporting president, before standing down last year to focus on other areas of the sport.

    Juan Pablo Angel - Atletico Nacional

    Angel perhaps never quite lived up to the expectations he set during his early days as part of River Plate's so-called 'Fantastic Four' with Javier Saviola, Ariel Ortega and Pablo Aimar, having joined from Colombia's Nacional. Nevertheless, he became a fan favourite at Aston Villa in the Premier League, before spending six years in MLS with New York Red Bulls, Los Angeles Galaxy and Chivas USA. In 2013 he returned to Nacional for two seasons, having left them in 1997. He called it quits in late 2014, just a few days after losing to his former club River in the final of the Copa Sudamericana. "I am ending my career with a final between the two clubs I love the most," he said.

    Henrik Larsson - Hogaborgs

    While the Swedish club most may associate with Larsson is Helsingborgs, he actually made the breakthrough at a smaller side – Hogaborgs. It was here where he trained from the age of six, before eventually becoming a regular in the senior side and earning a move to Helsingborgs. A trophy-laden career followed, taking him to Feyenoord, Celtic, Barcelona and Manchester United. Although he retired in 2009, he returned to the pitch for Raa in the Swedish third tier three years later, before then finding himself back in the team at Hogaborgs in 2013, helping out due to an injury crisis despite him only previously being registered to a casual team for 'seniors'. This gave him the chance to play alongside his son, Jordan.

    Carlos Tevez - Boca Juniors

    The Tevez-Boca love affair has dominated most of the striker's successful and complex career. After coming through their youth ranks, the feisty forward was seen as the heir to Maradona. A brief stint in Brazil with Corinthians followed, but Europe had long since beckoned, even if West Ham was by no means the expected destination. He went on to play for Manchester United and Manchester City, increasing tension between the clubs, before then going to Juventus, but throughout this time Tevez seemed to long for a return to Boca. He went back to La Bombonera in 2015, his homecoming interrupted by a brief spell with Shanghai Shenhua in 2017 in the Chinese Super League, though even Tevez acknowledged he saw his time in China as a "holiday". "He filled Santa's sack with dollars and now he has returned to Boca" was Maradona's assessment upon 'El Apache's' return from the CSL.

  • Barcelona spell the worst year of my career, says Martino Barcelona spell the worst year of my career, says Martino

    Mexico head coach Gerardo Martino says his season in charge of Barcelona was the worst of his career.

    Martino took over at Camp Nou from Tito Vilanova in July 2013 and enjoyed a positive start, winning the Supercopa de Espana on away goals against Atletico Madrid.

    Barca started the LaLiga season with a 7-0 thrashing of Levante before winning his first Clasico 2-1 at home to Real Madrid in October.

    The season ended in disappointment, though, with Atletico pipping Barca to the title after holding them to a 1-1 draw at Camp Nou on the final day of the league season, having lost the Copa del Rey final to Real Madrid a month earlier.

    Martino, who stepped down after the Atletico draw, says it was trying to get the best out of the squad while attempting to embrace their stylistic traditions that made life difficult.

    "From the results side of things, it wasn't a bad year," he said, as quoted by Sport. "We won a trophy and we played in a final, but at Barcelona what matters is how many trophies you win.

    "However, I say it was my worst year because my contribution as coach started and finished with the management of the team.

    "There were concerns that my management had a short life and, for me, the Clasico against Real Madrid that we won 2-1 at home was key.

    "We scored the second goal running into space and if Barcelona ran into space, it was because something did not fit together.

    "But I understand that, if we could add anything to the team, it was not to deny the possibility of running.

    "Speed was going to make Barcelona more complete because when there were lapses in the dominance of the opposition, it was good to go back and move into space. That was carried out the following year, with Luis Enrique."

  • UltimateXI Profile: Hugo Sánchez UltimateXI Profile: Hugo Sánchez

    Hugo Sánchez Márquez was a prolific goalscorer and between himself and Rafa Marquez, one must find themselves using the term ‘the greatest player Mexico has ever produced’. In 684 games between 1976 and 1997, Sanchez scored 400 goals, better than one in every two games. But he isn’t just regarded as one of, if not the greatest players Mexico has produced, he was one of the greatest of his generation. To this day, only three people have scored more goals in La Liga history than Sánchez, with some massive names in that list. Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo and Telmo Zarra are the only players to have scored more. Sánchez played 58 times for Mexico, scoring 29 goals along the way, but was famous for the nature of some of those goals. It was not unusual for Sánchez to finish with a volley from some unlikely body positions. Diminutive, but athletic, Sanchez would even score headers above taller, stronger defenders, and had exquisite kicking technique that led to a powerful shot with very little warning.  

    Playing Career

    Full name: Hugo Sánchez Márquez (Hugo Sánchez)

    Date of birth: 11 July 1958 (age 61)

    Place of birth: Mexico City, Mexico

    Height: 1.75m (5ft 9 in)

    Playing position: Forward

    Club Career

             Years           Team                             Apps      (Gls)

    • 1976–1981   UNAM                                 188      (97)
    • 1979–1980   San Diego Sockers (loan)       32      (26)
    • 1981–1985   Atlético Madrid                    111      (54)
    • 1985–1992   Real Madrid                        207     (164)
    • 1992–1993   América                               29     (11)
    • 1993–1994   Rayo Vallecano                     29     (16)
    • 1994–1995   Atlante                                 31     (13)
    • 1995–1996   Linz                                     20       (6)
    • 1996            Dallas Burn                          25     (11)
    • 1997            Atlético Celaya                     12       (2)
    • Total                                                   684    (400)

    Club Honours

    • UNAM - Primera División: 1976–77, 1980–81; CONCACAF Champions' Cup: 1980; Copa Interamericana: 1980
    • Atlético Madrid - Copa del Rey: 1984–85
    • Real Madrid - La Liga: 1985–86, 1986–87, 1987–88, 1988–89, 1989–90; Supercopa de España: 1988, 1989 , 1990; Copa del Rey: 1988–89; UEFA Cup: 1985–86
    • América - CONCACAF Champions' Cup: 1992
    • Linz - First League: 1995–96

    International Career

    • 1977-1994 Mexico 58 (29)

    International Honours

    • Pan American Games: 1975
    • CONCACAF Gold Cup: 1977

    Individual Honours

    • European Golden Shoe: 1990
    • La Liga top goalscorer: 1984–85, 1985–86, 1986–87, 1987–88, 1989–90
    • Don Balón Award – Best Foreign Player: 1986–87, 1989–90
    • Mexican Primera División top goalscorer: 1978–79
    • CONCACAF Champions' Cup top goalscorer: 1992
    • Best Sportist of Mexico of the 20th century
    • IFFHS Best footballer of Mexico of the 20th century
    • IFFHS Best footballer of CONCACAF of the 20th century
    • FIFA 100: 2004
    • Golden Foot Legends Award: 2010
    • FIFA XI: 1982
    • IFFHS Legends
    • Marca Leyenda: 2018
© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.