Bobo returns to Sydney FC after prolific first spell

By Sports Desk January 01, 2021

Bobo has returned to Sydney FC, joining the A-League club for a second stint.

The Brazilian striker enjoyed a successful spell at the club between 2016 and 2018, winning two premierships, a championship and an FFA Cup.

Bobo, who turns 36 on January 9, won the A-League Golden Boot in 2017-18.

The former Besiktas and Gremio striker has had spells at Alanyaspor, Hyderabad FC and Oeste since leaving Sydney, but his return for the 2020-21 campaign was confirmed on Friday.

"I enjoyed every moment of my time at Sydney FC, we had a hugely successful two seasons and I want that again," Bobo said.

"The club has hardly missed a beat since, winning both A-League titles and the Premiers' Plate and I can't wait to go for three in a row.

"My family and I still feel like members of the Sky Blue family and for us this is like a journey home.  

"We are looking forward to seeing everyone, particularly all of our members again, and to get going on another exciting ride."

Bobo scored 42 goals in 57 A-League games during his previous stint. Besart Berisha (35) was the next best over the same period.

Of Bobo's goals, 10 were headers, while all 42 came from inside the box. It included 11 penalties.

 

Sydney begin their A-League campaign against Wellington Phoenix on Saturday, but Bobo is set to complete quarantine and be available for the derby against the Western Sydney Wanderers on January 16.

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