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United States forward Megan Rapinoe has echoed Serena Williams' comments on equal pay amid the Women's World Cup winners' ongoing fight for parity with the men's team.

Rapinoe scored the opening goal as USA beat Netherlands 2-0 in the World Cup final to retain their title during a tournament where the 34-year-old became a global icon.

The attacker also had a war of words with US president Donald Trump during the tournament in France after saying she was "not going to the f****** White House".

American players have been embroiled in an argument over equal pay with governing body U.S. Soccer for many years.

After losing the Wimbledon final to Simona Halep on Saturday, tennis great Williams bristled at a suggestion she should scale back her efforts to fight equal pay in order to concentrate on matching Margaret Court's record of 24 grand slam singles titles.

And Rapinoe, speaking in an interview on NBC on Sunday, backed her fellow American and insisted she will also not be changing her outspoken approach.

"You know what? I'm gonna fight for equal pay every day, for myself, for my team, and for every single person out there," said Rapinoe.

"Man, woman, immigrant, US citizen, person of colour, whatever it may be. 'Equal pay,' as the great Serena Williams said, 'til I'm in my grave'."

Rapinoe, whose partner is basketball player Sue Bird, also defended her previous comments on Trump when asked what she would say to her fans who support the president and believe she should go to the White House.

She added: "I would try to share our message. Do you believe that all people are created equal? Do you believe that equal pay should be mandated?

"Do you believe that everyone should have health care? Do you believe that we should treat everyone with respect? Those are the basics of what we're talking about.

"I understand people feel upset or uncomfortable. There's feelings of disrespect about the anthem protest or things that I've said in the past. Ultimately, I am here, open and honest.

"I've admitted mistakes. I will continue to do that. I'll continue to be vulnerable and be honest and open and have that conversation."

The United States have opened up the biggest gap at the top of the women's FIFA rankings in history following their World Cup triumph.

Jill Ellis' side won their second successive title last Sunday with a 2-0 victory over Netherlands in the final in Lyon.

They remain in first place in the international standings but now boast a record gap of 121 points over second-place Germany, who lost to Sweden in the quarter-finals.

Runners-up Netherlands are up five places to third, their best ever position, while bronze medallists Sweden climb three places to sixth.

France stay fourth, with England, beaten by USA in the semi-finals and then Sweden in the third-place play-off match, slip two places to fifth.

The biggest movers are the Philippines (67th place, up seven) and India (57th place, up six), who are rewarded for strong showings in qualifying for next year's Olympic Games.

The list now comprises 158 teams, up from 155, which is also an all-time record.

Assistant Referees Stephanie-Dale Yee Sing and Princess Brown are basking in the glory of World Cup heaven.

The Jamaicans are back home after an exemplary stint at the FIFA Women’s World Cup in France where Concacaf giant the USA retained its title after blanking The Netherlands 2-0 in Lyon on July 7th.

Yee Sing and Brown, who were among eight Assistant Referees and five Referees representing Concacaf at the showpiece, top of their performance with doing duty in the semi-final match between The Netherlands and Sweden.

The Jamaicans supported Canada’s Soleil Beaudoin, who was in charge in the middle.

The pair continues to be the region's standard bearers, after last year becoming the first Caribbean officials — male or female — to feature in a World Cup final at the Under-17 tournament in Uruguay.

Prior to being awarded one of the two semi-finals, the team of Brown and Yee Sing, along with Beaudoin, officiated three other games with distinction.

It started on June 8 with the Group B clash between Germany and China at Roazhon Park, Rennes, followed by the June 17 Group A fixture between Norway and South Korea at Stade Auguste-Delaune in Reims.

Their next assignment came on June 23, the Round of 16  between host France and Brazil at Stade Océane, Le Havre. The team was also reserved for two other contests.

Both Brown and Yee Sing are floating on Cloud Nine after the magical, life-changing experience.

“It was a great moment and an honor for us, it was also a challenge. We knew that we had to go out there and we had to work very hard to get another game, so we took it one game at a time to achieve our goal.

“I was really surprised (when we got the semi-finals) because you have other referees who were there who had a lot of World Cup experience, and for us to be there it was a great privilege,” noted Brown, the more experienced of the two.

 Brown, who rose from the deep rural Jamaican community of Mosquito Bottom in St Elizabeth parish, had made her debut at a global event when she officiated in one match at the Fifa Women's World Cup Canada 2015.

The Jamaican made an observation on the use of the cutting edge Video Assistant Referee (VAR), which, on review, overturned an off-side call by her in France. 

“It's a different system and you have to know how to work with VAR. I had a decision with VAR and I felt bad in myself not making the right decision because even though you have help, you want to make the decision on your own, but it is an experience and I was glad that VAR was there to correct me and I just have to move on from that,” Brown noted.

Yee Sing described the overall experience as “an amazing feeling”.

“It was my first World Cup and it surpassed what I went there to do, so I am happy about this accomplishment.

“We took it one game at a time, but to be doing a semi-final, I said to Princess I think I am a small fry compared to the other referees that were there. So I was totally surprised that I got to do a semi-final on my first attempt and I am really proud of that,” Yee Sing noted.

She said while it was her first time performing at the highest level, she was neither intimated nor fearful.

“There was no fear to make my calls because from what we learn at home, training should reflect the game and everything that we did in training is basically what came out in the game and our referee gave us that confidence in ourselves to make decisions and help her to make decisions, so we could look good as a team.

“So basically it is what we have been doing in training and how they see our growth, how we perform each game and how we improve on whatever task they gave us that may have resulted in us getting the semi-finals. And to be honest, they told us we exceeded their expectation, just as how we exceeded our own expectations,” she said.

Megan Rapinoe hailed her United States team-mates as an example for the country to follow but told a huge crowd celebrating their Women's World Cup triumph that she will not be running for president, saying: "I'm busy."

During the victory parade through New York, the 34-year-old forward stoked the fire of her spat with president Donald Trump, which began during the tournament when she said that she and her colleagues would not be going to the White House if they lifted the trophy.

Having helped defend the title on French soil, Rapinoe reiterated her stance when it comes to visiting the president - a job she cheekily rejected was in her future plans.

"I couldn’t be more proud to be a co-captain of this team with Carli [Lloyd] and Alex [Morgan]," she said. "It's an absolute honour to lead this team out on the field.

"There's no other place I would rather be. Even in a presidential race. I'm busy, I'm sorry."

Trump had previously addressed Rapinoe's comments on Twitter, calling on the player to "WIN first before she TALKS!" in a post.

Having risen to the challenge, Rapinoe resisted the temptation to fire back at Trump but offered no apology. She did, however, call for everyone to come together and make the world a "better place".

"There has been so much contention in these last years. I've been a victim of that, I've been a perpetrator of that," she said.

"We had a fight with the federation – I'm sorry for some of the things I said. Not all of the things.

"We have to be better. We have to love more, hate less. We have to listen more, talk less. We have to know that it is everyone's responsibility. It's our responsibility to make this world a better place.

"I think this team does an incredible job of taking that on our shoulders and understanding the position we have and the platform we have in this world. It's time to come together. We have to collaborate. My charge to everybody - do what you can.

"If this team is any representation of what you can be when you do that, please take this as an example. This group is incredible. Yes we play sports, yes we play soccer, yes we're female athletes, but we're so much more than that."

The United States have been told they risk losing their status as the best team in women's football if the "starvation wages" in their domestic league are not addressed.

USA won a fourth Women's World Cup title in Lyon on Sunday, retaining the trophy with a 2-0 victory over Netherlands after knocking out European heavyweights France and England in the previous two rounds.

Megan Rapinoe, the tournament's Golden Boot and Golden Ball winner, once again spoke about the disparity in prize money between the women's and men's finals afterwards, with USA's players taking home $4million compared to the $38m France accrued for winning the men's World Cup in Russia last year.

There is also a huge gap between the top domestic leagues in America, where the minimum and maximum salaries for this NWSL season are $16,538 and $46,200 respectively, compared to the minimum in MLS of $56,250 and the maximum, which will be paid to LA Galaxy star Zlatan Ibrahimovic, of $7.2m.

Each of the 23 players in Jill Ellis' World Cup-winning squad ply their trade in NWSL - though their salaries are subsidised by the United States Soccer Federation (USSF) and include payments for their international feats - and former USA coach Anson Dorrance wants greater investment at the professional level.

Dorrance, who led USA to their maiden World Cup triumph in 1991 and coached the likes of Crystal Dunn and Tobin Heath at the collegiate level in his current role at North Carolina, told Omnisport: "An entry-level professional is paid $16,500 a year in the NWSL. That's starvation wages. 

"I would love to see more and more women start to make the sort of money we're seeing on the men's side."

While USA were able to see off the challenge of the Europeans this time, the other seven World Cup quarter-finalists all came from the continent and the balance of power may have shifted by 2023.

There has been increased investment in the women's game in Europe in recent years, major clubs like Lyon, Barcelona, Juventus and Manchester City all significantly backing their women's teams.

"We're going to be in trouble if we don't create a league that competes with what the Europeans are doing now," added Shannon Higgins-Cirovski, who was a key member of the World Cup-winning team in 1991.

"Hats off to us at this point, [but] I'm hoping we can create something from this momentum and make it so we don't have to worry about that."

Rapinoe said after USA's win on Sunday that FIFA president Gianni Infantino, who had revealed plans to double the prize money for the next Women's World Cup, wants to speak to her about the financial matters after fans chanted "equal pay" at the final.

There will also be conversations between USSF and Ellis' players over the pay gap between USA's men's and women's teams, with the newly crowned World Cup winners having instigated legal action against the federation earlier this year for alleged gender discrimination over earnings and working conditions.

Dorrance wants to see equality, but also greater transparency over the revenue generated by the two teams given reports suggest the women bring in more than their male counterparts.

"[The USFF should] have a very transparent set of accounting books to show exactly what happens," Dorrance added.

"This is how many people watched this Women's World Cup game in the United States, here were the sponsorship dollars and here's how we're going to reward our women that have just won the event. I would love for that to become clearer.

"In terms of per diem, there should be no difference, those should be the same, then your rewards should be based on what you make.

"I don't think all of a sudden these women should be paid the amount of money Christian Pulisic is paid [by Chelsea] because of the crowd he's played in front of at Borussia Dortmund and what he will play in front of at Chelsea.

"But I would love for it to be transparent and for them to be paid what they're worth."

Donald Trump tweeted his congratulations to the United States for their Women's World Cup triumph on Sunday, but whether he hosts the team at the White House remains to be seen.

USA defeated Netherlands 2-0 to make it back-to-back titles on the global stage, with Megan Rapinoe and Rose Lavelle scoring the goals in the second half.

Shortly after the final whistle, USA president Trump wrote on Twitter: "Congratulations to the U.S. Women's Soccer Team on winning the World Cup! Great and exciting play. America is proud of you all!"

Trump has been outspoken during USA's run in France as he went on a Twitter rant after a video surfaced of Rapinoe making it clear she would not visit the White House should her side end up as champions.

He also called out the 34-year-old, who ended the tournament as winner of the Golden Boot for top goalscorer and Golden Ball for best player, for protesting during the national anthem by refusing to sing or put her hand over her chest. 

He wrote, in part: "Megan should never disrespect our country, the White House, or our flag, especially since so much has been done for her and the team."

There remain questions as to whether the national team will attend the White House if they receive an invite, but head coach Jill Ellis is not convinced any such offer will be made.

When asked if she would attend a celebration at the White House, she said: "I haven't been invited yet." The reporter responded by saying: "I'm sure you will." Ellis, however, said with a laugh: "Well, I wouldn't bet on that."

Megan Rapinoe wants action on the issue of equal pay after helping the United States to a fourth Women's World Cup final triumph.

USA beat Netherlands 2-0 in Lyon on Sunday to retain their title, Rapinoe scoring a second-half penalty before Rose Lavelle found the net too.

At the next World Cup in 2023, FIFA president Gianni Infantino wishes to double the prize money to $60million, yet at the men's competition in 2022, teams in Qatar will have a pot of $440m.

Rapinoe, who spoke at length on the issue prior to Sunday's final, revisited the matter again having collected her Golden Boot and Golden Ball awards for the tournament's top scorer and best player.

She also called for action from the US Soccer Federation (USFF), with the players in Jill Ellis' team having taken legal action against the governing body earlier this year over pay disparity.and working conditions.

"Everyone's asking what's next and what we want to come all of this – it's to stop having the conversation about equal pay and are we worth it," Rapinoe said.

"What are we going to do about it? Gianni, what are we going to do about it? Carlos [Cordeiro, USFF president], what are we going to do about it? Everyone. It's time to sit down with everyone and really get to work.

"This game has done so much for all of us, we've put so much into it. I think it's a testament to the quality on the field.

"I don't think everything else is matching that. How we do get everything to match up and push this forward because I think at this point the argument that we have been having is totally null and void."

She added in the post-match press conference: "It's time to move that conversation forward to the next step. A little public shame never hurt anybody, right?"

Rapinoe, who scored six times in France, was presented with both of her individual prizes by Infantino on the pitch after the game.

Asked what they spoke about, she replied: "Just pleasantries. There was a wry smile in there, for sure. He knows that I know.

"I think he did say, 'Let's have a conversation'. I said, 'I'd love to'."

Infantino would also have heard fans in the stadium chanting 'equal pay' while he was on the pitch.

Rapinoe and her USA team-mates will share a pot of $4m for winning the tournament, with France's men's squad earning $38m for triumphing in Russia last year.

"Love it," Rapinoe said of the chants.

"To have a full stadium in a foreign country, the movement is just swelling before our very eyes.

"Obviously you have the president of France there [Emmanuel Macron], the president of FIFA, you have our [USFF] president, delegates from all over the world.

"This is what the people want, give the people what they want, always."

Megan Rapinoe was awarded the Golden Boot and Golden Ball after inspiring the United States to Women's World Cup glory.

The 34-year-old opened the scoring from the penalty spot as USA defeated Netherlands 2-0 in Lyon on Sunday to claim back-to-back global titles.

She finished level on six goals with team-mate Alex Morgan and England forward Ellen White but edged the Golden Boot by virtue of a better minutes-per-goal ratio.

It marked Rapinoe's first Golden Boot in her third World Cup appearance and she could not describe the feeling after the match.

"I don't know how to feel right now, it's ridiculous," she said.

Rapinoe started with one goal in the group stage and followed it up with back-to-back braces, scoring all four of USA's goals in the knockout phase before the semi-final, for which she was an unused substitute. 

She was also crowned the tournament's best player for her performances, with England's Lucy Bronze taking the Silver Ball and Rose Lavelle, who scored USA's second in the final, claiming third.

Megan Rapinoe dubbed her United States team-mates "crazy" and "special" after she scored the opening goal in their 2-0 Women's World Cup final victory over Netherlands.

The 34-year-old Reign FC forward scored a 61st-minute penalty to put Jill Ellis' side ahead against a resilient Netherlands team before Rose Lavelle lit up the game with a virtuoso goal eight minutes later.

The result helped USA triumph for the fourth time on the biggest stage of the women's game and Rapinoe, who was part of the team that won the tournament in 2015, paid tribute to the spirit in the camp.

"I don't think I can [describe it]," the forward told BBC Sport. "It's unbelievable.

"Just to know all the people in our group who put in so much work, obviously the players, we have all our friends and family here.

"It's surreal. I don't know how to feel right now. It's ridiculous.

"We're crazy, that's what makes us special. We've got no quit in us, we're so tight and we'll do anything to win."

Lavelle's goal was her third of the tournament and Rapinoe praised the 24-year-old midfielder's creativity as being pivotal to USA's success, while highlighting her performance in the final as her best.

"That was what she's been missing, just that little bit, all tournament," said Rapinoe.

"She's been on the dribble, opening up everything for us. For her to get that reward on the biggest stage you possibly can, I'm so proud of her.

"She's a superstar, not even in the making - she's a straight-up superstar."

USA coach Jill Ellis pointed to her players' "fantastic resilience and chemistry" in her summing up of a moment she admitted left her lost for words.

Ellis previously led the USA to glory in the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship and the 2015 World Cup, and she said of her current squad: "They put their hearts and souls into this journey and I can't thank them enough. It has been fantastic.

"I could barely speak but I just said to them they were unbelievable, congratulations, they made history, enjoy it.

"This is unbelievable, I've got no words."

The most powerful man in the world urged her to speak only after she had finished the job, but on Sunday Megan Rapinoe became a Women's World Cup winner again having done it her way.

Jill Ellis' United States side beat Netherlands 2-0 in the final to become the first American team to retain the trophy and, naturally, it was Rapinoe, the most prominent figure at the tournament, who was front and centre.

USA were held at bay for over an hour against a robust Dutch team. Goalkeeper Sari van Veenendaal was outstanding, brilliantly thwarting Julie Ertz, Sam Mewis and Alex Morgan - twice - in the first half.

But when Stefanie van der Gragt's studs caught Morgan's side, USA were awarded a penalty following a VAR review. Rapinoe had the chance to alleviate the tension and put her country on course for that winning part US President Donald Trump placed as a feeble pre-requisite for holding an opinion.

And so, in the 61st minute, Rapinoe stepped up and, with unnerving coolness, finally beat Van Veenendaal.

She ran over to the corner and delivered her signature 'Are You Not Entertained?' pose. It will be the defining image of this World Cup, which, despite the Europeans' emergence, remains in American hands after Rose Lavelle added a brilliant second eight minutes after Rapinoe's penalty.

It seems fitting that the United States ended up winning a tournament where the question, for once, has not been, 'How do we get people interested in women's football?' but, 'How do we build on it?'

USA are, after all, at the forefront of that push, with players such as Rapinoe driving the agenda on numerous issues, from LGBT rights to racial equality, while attracting audiences most other nations can only dream of.

On Saturday Rapinoe said "so much of what we have to shoulder all of the time is heavy", explaining that the football pitch gave USA players a chance to "be free", which is something not all who protest are afforded.

Colin Kaepernick, the NFL quarterback who took his team to the Super Bowl but has been out of the league for three years having knelt during the American anthem, never got another chance to "win first before he talks".

Tommie Smith and John Carlos, the two sprinters who raised their fists on the podium at the 1968 Olympics, were ostracised upon their returns to America despite winning first and then talking.

Rapinoe knew all of that and yet, admirably, she still spoke up for what she believed in. She saw the president tell her to button up on Twitter and responded with three goals her next two games on the biggest stage.

The 34-year-old did plenty of talking in France and had the final word in Lyon, finishing the job - as always - on her own terms.

Megan Rapinoe struck a 61st-minute penalty before Rose Lavelle netted a fine solo goal as the United States beat Netherlands 2-0 to become Women's World Cup winners for the fourth time.

Reign FC forward Rapinoe plundered her sixth goal of the tournament to ensure Jill Ellis' side successfully defended their title at the expense of a Netherlands team that fought bravely to overcome their underdogs tag but ultimately came up short.

The goal, which came after a VAR review highlighted Stefanie van der Gragt's foul on Alex Morgan, drew Rapinoe level with Morgan and England's Ellen White in the goalscoring stakes, while Netherlands forward Lieke Martens cut a frustrated figure as the Dutch struggled to create chances.

Lavelle provided the best moment of an entertaining clash in Lyon when she carried the ball from the centre circle to the edge of the box before producing a classy finish, the quality of which reflected everything crowds at this World Cup have come to expect from its dominant team.

The European champions certainly played their part but, perhaps fittingly after a tournament marked by the use of technology, the contest hinged on a challenge that might have gone unnoticed without it.

Sherida Spitse was booked for a late sliding challenge on Lavelle in a cagey opening spell that saw the United States fail to score inside the opening 12 minutes of a game for the first time at this year's tournament.

The USA struggled to break down a compact Dutch defence until Julie Ertz thundered a volley towards goal after 28 minutes but Sari van Veenendaal was equal to it, parrying the ball away from danger.

Van der Gragt's superb interception prevented Morgan from latching onto a long ball forward and Van Veenendaal then made two excellent saves to deny the forward before Netherlands ended a battling first-half performance with a dangerous spell of pressure.

Netherlands continued to frustrate USA until Van der Gragt's high challenge on Morgan prompted a VAR review and, after a penalty was correctly awarded, Rapinoe side-footed the ensuing spot-kick low to Van Veenendaal's left and into the net.

Vivianne Miedema tore through the USA defence with a mazy dribble but could not get her shot away and moments later Lavelle provided a finishing lesson, making space for herself on the edge of Netherlands' box before stroking a left-footed shot into the corner of the net.

Van Veenendaal made an excellent save to deny Crystal Dunn when the left-back burst clear but there was no time for her team-mates to mount a comeback as the world champions deservedly secured back-to-back titles.

Megan Rapinoe has overcome a hamstring injury to return to the United States' starting XI for the Women's World Cup final, while Lieke Martens has also been handed a start for Netherlands following a fitness test.

USA forward Rapinoe, who has scored five goals in France, missed the semi-final win over England with a "slight hamstring strain", but trained the following day and said all week she expected to be fit.

Martens' status was less assured, the Barcelona star having come off at half-time in the last-four win over Sweden due to a toe injury she sustained when celebrating her winner against Japan in the round of 16.

However, despite not being involved in the portion of training open to the media on Saturday, she is fit enough to take her place in Sarina Wiegman's side.

Christen Press, who replaced Rapinoe and scored the first goal against England, reverts back to the bench as one of two changes in the USA team, with Sam Mewis also coming in for Lindsey Horan.

The Dutch have made just one change, Anouk Dekker replacing Merel van Dongen.

Phil Neville admitted his England players have "destroyed" him at the Women's World Cup as he opened up about his new-found sensitivity and the importance of creating a positive environment for the Lionesses to thrive in.

The former Manchester United and Everton midfielder said England's journey to the semi-finals, where they lost 2-1 to the United States, had left him more prone to teary moments and with a tendency to smile and relax, while describing his squad as "an unbelievable set of girls".

England lost 2-1 to Sweden in Saturday's third-place play-off – a game Neville wrote off as "a nonsense" - but he spoke about his pride in his players and his determination to reflect deeply on their performance.

"They destroyed me," Neville told 90min.com.

"They turned me into an emotional wreck. I cry at everything – I cry at watching Dirty Dancing now, and Pretty Woman. Because they are the most unbelievable set of girls, honestly they are.

"You think some days that they're not going to be up for today and they are. They drive each other forward. They inspire me.

"They've changed me. In life you're always at your best when you're happy and when you're having fun, and for these players to perform at their best I think at times I've needed to relax.

"I've always been a 100-miles-an-hour, eyeballs out, intense type of guy, but sometimes they like to see a smile, the smile gives them comfort and that feeling that you trust them and they've made me into that kind of person."

Neville has just short of two months to take stock of England's performance before the squad regroups for a friendly against Norway in September.

He indicated that the Lionesses, who were also eliminated from the World Cup at the semi-final stage in 2015, are playing the brand of football he has been aiming for since he took charge in January 2018.

"You have periods in the day when you think we were so close, and then you have periods where you get maybe a little bit angry that we should've done more," said Neville. "Maybe 12 months ago should we have been firmer.

"When you start reviewing some of the work you've done, some of your tactics or whatever, you do have to self-reflect. And I'm sure that after the tournament I'll probably do that more than anyone because ultimately the responsibility falls with me.

"We've still got to be proud of the work we've done and I'm proud of the way the players tried to play.

"The semi-final was enthralling. 56,000 people, my players playing the type of football I want them to play, every single player giving their all. I said to them at the start of the game, don't leave anything and they didn't leave anything. They left their hearts on the field."

Netherlands may have recorded 12 straight victories at major tournaments, but coach Sarina Wiegman knows the United States will be expected to win Sunday's Women's World Cup final.

Winners of the European Championship on home soil two years ago, Netherlands are one victory away from lifting back-to-to-back titles despite only appearing at a major tournament for the first time a decade ago.

They come up against the juggernaut of women's football in Lyon this weekend, though, with USA bidding to retain their title in their third consecutive final.

However, Wiegman has no qualms with the fact that her team are not fancied to prevail. 

"The expectation is different now," she admitted.

"The US are favourites and we're the underdog, and we're fine with that."

There has been debate about whether USA have been just confident or overly arrogant at the tournament. Their goal celebrations have irked some and England boss Phil Neville was unimpressed that two USA staff members visited his team's hotel ahead of the semi-final in case Jill Ellis' team moved in before the final.

Wiegman, who spent a year in the States during her playing career, does not consider Netherlands' next opponents as cocky, though.

"I just think America has a lot of confidence and that's okay," she said.

"They have a very good status, they have won many tournaments and are at the top level all the time.

"It's also a little part of the culture, I think. That's just the way it is."

The Dutch coach's time in North Carolina three decades ago was pivotal in her development, with Wiegman playing under future World Cup-winning coach Anson Dorrance and alongside USA internationals such as Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly.

Now she will look to use those lessons to plot the Americans' downfall.

"I learned so many things over there," added Wiegman, who revealed star forward Lieke Martens will have a late fitness test on her foot injury.

"What I picked up at the time was a huge positIvity about developing team spirit. I really felt that family feeling and I was in a top team with top coaches.

"Whether it can help me tomorrow, I'm not sure."

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