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St Anthony's cruise to 4-0 win over Speyside

By Sports Desk November 26, 2019

St Anthony’s College cruised into the semifinal of the Coca Cola National Intercollegiate league on the back of hammering Speyside 4-0, at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on Tuesday.

In a one-sided affair, St Anthony’s, the North Zone champions, dominated throughout the fixture and found the back of the net as early as the 3rd minute.  It was a poorly marked Kiron Manswell who opened the scoring with a delicate chip into the net from a low cross.  After missing several presentable opportunities to extend their lead, Jean-Heim Mcfee’s low drive from 25-yards again bulged the target to finally extend the lead in the 30th minute.

Kahim Thomas put St Anthony’s out of sight with a swerving freekick four minutes later, which goalkeeper Kadeem Joseph seemed to badly misjudge.

  In another chance-filled half, Kai Phillip put the polish on a dominant performance from St Anthony when he blasted another long-range effort into the back of the net in the 79th minute.  The midfielder threatened to add another five minutes later but failed to get enough venom on a shot after slithering his way past the Speyside backline.

St Anthony’s will face Presentation College in the competition’s semi-final round.  Presentation edged Naparima College 4-3 on penalty kicks, following a 1-1 regulation time finish in the South Zone Intercol final.

 

 

 

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    Trinidad and Tobago Men’s football team captain, Khaleem Hyland, is stuck in Saudi Arabia without his lifeblood, football, but he does send a message filled with hope.

    According to Hyland, life without football is tough, especially when he cannot leave Saudi Arabia to be with his family in the twin-island republic, but still, there is opportunity in the midst of all this.

    “It’s been difficult for everyone as not being able to play football is very hard to endure. I see everyone posting all this time without football and life is not normal. The supporters and players both here and at home have a challenging time to get through,” said Hyland.

    “I wish everyone the best of health and best of luck. We know the procedures we need to follow to be clean and be healthy. We need to rally together as a country to get it all back on track. Hopefully, we can live as one again as a country and as people in this world,” he said.

    As for T&T’s football, Hyland believes there is work to be done to get it back to where it should be, but that there are the tools to do it.

    “Now we have a new coach. It’s been a while now Terry Fenwick has been aiming and hoping that he would get the job. Congratulations to him. I worked with him at a young age at Jabloteh and I know he is a very good person. He knows what he wants and he knows how to get information to players and get quality out of them. He tends to have his ideas and plans on board,” said Hyland.

    According to the Al-Faisaly midfielder, while he has much respect for Fenwick, he is also aware that how quickly T&T can recover post-COVID-19 also depends heavily on the players and fans.

    “Hopefully we can all work for the best for our country and for our football to move onto the right track and hopefully we can move on to better ways, winning ways or to even a better structure than the past,” he said.

    “We just have to look forward to the future and work hard as a team. Everyone needs to do their own homework also. It’s a new coach in charge now and everyone has a chance to show what they can do and bring forward the best towards the national team. We are representing the Red, White and Black and we need to do our best for our country. It is an honour to always wear the colours of Trinidad and Tobago.”

    On a more personal note, Hyland has been keeping fit in the hope that football in Saudi Arabia can restart sooner rather than later.

    “I’ve been going through my paces every day, working hard, training hard The last couple months paid off with me getting on the scoresheet and the team doing great before COVID-19 took over,” he said.

    Hyland also had a word for his family in a difficult time, assuring them he is safe.

    “Right now here in Saudi Arabia and in the world everything is at a standstill and the league has been postponed. It is hard for me to be here with days off and I cannot leave the country and cannot fly to go and be with my loved ones. I have a couple friends here in Saudi Arabia and they make me feel at home away from home. The atmosphere in Saudi Arabia is still good and they are dealing with it well and taking the precautionary measures to ensure we are safe.

  • BFA treasurer Donovan expects FIFA suspension for TTFA BFA treasurer Donovan expects FIFA suspension for TTFA

    Barbados Football Association (BFA) treasurer Adrian Donovan believes the Trinidad and Tobago FA are on their way to being suspended, considering recent retaliation against the implementation of a FIFA normalisation committee.

    The football world governing body made the decision to disband the TTFA and implement a normalization committee, following what it claims was a fact-finding mission to the twin-island republic.  According to FIFA the TTFA had “extremely low overall financial management methods” and extreme debt.  In doing so FIFA quoted article 8:2 of FIFA’s statutes, which states, "Executive bodies of member associations may under exceptional circumstances be removed from office by the council in consultation with the relevant confederation and replaced by a normalisation committee for a specific period of time."

    The William Wallace-led association has, however, since threatened to take the matter to the Courts of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) a move that Donovan considers a mistake.

    “I have no doubt in my mind whatsoever, that the TTFA will be suspended,” Donovan told the Barbados Advocate.

    “In all of this FIFA is absolutely correct if they have to suspend this national federation because all those who signed off on the FIFA Statutes are expected to follow their rules and regulations,” he added.

    “When you sign under FIFA rules and regulation and you have no legitimate evidence as to how you have spent their money, it is only a matter of time before the weight of FIFA would be felt.”

    Since coming to office the William Wallace-led association pointed to mismanagement in the implementation of the Home of Football project, put in place by the previous administration.  The new executive seemed set to put into place another ambitious project at the Arima Stadium.

     

  • Opinion:  Much of TTFA, FIFA fallout still shrouded in confusion and contradiction Opinion: Much of TTFA, FIFA fallout still shrouded in confusion and contradiction

    Even from a distance, it seems impossible not to gawk at the mangled train wreck that has unfolded at the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association and not be overcome with a sense of bewilderment.

    In a press conference earlier this month, then newly elected president William Wallace became the latest in a long line of TTFA bosses to firmly plant allegations of widespread corruption at the feet of the previous tenants.  The new head honcho pointed to unpaid statutory deductions, bounced checks, a faulty finance structure as partial contributors to the body accruing a towering $US7,370,990 (TT$50,000,000).  Wallace also pointed to an incomplete Home of Football in Couva, which he claimed was shown to have structural flaws and lacking proper insurance. 

    In the midst of the doom and gloom, Wallace then went on to paint a much rosier outlook for the future of the TTFA, after claiming the newly appointed administration had already taken major steps to alleviate some of the issues.  A settlement had been reached with television commentator Selwyn Melville regarding the issue of who owns the ‘Soca Warriors’ (Now famous nickname of the Trinidad and Tobago Men's Senior team)  and the announcement of an unspecified memorandum of understanding that would clear the debt in ‘two to three years’. The president pointed out that the new body had secured a TT$25-million apparel deal, secured a broadcast and digital rights partner, sealed a domestic sponsor and secured a sponsor for the FA. 

    Good so far, but crucially, Wallace claimed that the work of a pair of accountants posted within his administration’s new internal finance structure satisfied a recent delegation of FIFA and Concacaf officials and that a better relationship could be expected going forward.  The bodies have long been at odds regarding the financial state of the local football body and had delayed its annual subvention.  A little over two weeks later FIFA disbanded the Board of the TTFA and appointed a normalization committee to take over affairs.  What on earth is going on? Nobody has explained to date.

    The timing of FIFA's intervention seems strange, deciding to disband a newly formed executive that seems to not only have implemented structural reform but also pledges for financial support. A perceived sense of chumminess with the former administration, whether real or imagined put this in an even worse light and could be a real black eye for a Gianni Infantino-led organisation, which claims to have taken on the mantle of crusaders against corruption.

    The response of the former TTFA members is, however, also interesting.

    Any claims about a violation of sovereign and democratically elected officials certainly does not fly as when it comes to football the twin-island republic falls directly under the governance of FIFA itself and not the state. In several instances, countries have been suspended from the organisation for violating just that principle. The charter and ordinances that govern all 211 national associations of which T&T are a part, and the particular article that was quoted, gives them the specific right to intervene in the affairs of a member nation.  Normalisation committees are not after all aberrations on the global football landscape with Ghana, Egypt, Pakistan and Namibia among a few of those that have received such ‘assistance’ in recent years. This isn't even the first time this has happened in the Caribbean, with FIFA taking over the Guyana Football Federation and putting in a normalisation committee for a little over a year.

    In other words, Caribbean Football Union (CFU) president Randy Harris was right, even if not popular, in pointing out that the appointment of normalisation committees is the prerogative of FIFA and can happen to any of the 211 national associations.  With all members agreeing to and playing under those statues it is difficult to see how it can be argued otherwise.

    Secondly, it’s hard to imagine supporting the argument that a measure put in place to mitigate against damage the TTFA has admitted exists, is unfair, and to do so with the question, 'why now?'. FIFA should perhaps have intervened long ago, but few could argue with firefighters attempting to save any part of a house that has been engulfed in flames for a prolonged period. We would not advocate them letting it burn to the ground. 

    Though they may not be required to, FIFA should, in the interest of the transparency they have long sought, give more details on the specifics of these particular circumstances.

     

     

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