Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Trinidad and Tobago High Court Justice Carol Gobin will hand down a decision on August 13 whether the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) will be compelled to abide by the arbitration process at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) or whether FIFA will be subject to the jurisdiction of the TT High Court in their ongoing dispute.

The TTFA and FIFA have been in dispute since March when FIFA dissolved the association’s administration who were in office four months and installed a normalization committee to oversee the affairs of the debt-ridden association.

TTFA took the matter to the CAS but later withdrew citing fears of institutional bias.

On May 18, lawyers for the William-Wallace executive had filed an application in the Trinidad and Tobago High Court seeking a permanent injunction to prevent FIFA from interfering or seeking to override the “fair and transparent democratic processes of the TTFA and/or preventing them from removing the executive of duly elected officers from office.

They are also seeking a permanent injunction against FIFA preventing FIFA and/or its agents from interfering with the day-to-day management of the association, including its bank accounts, website and real property.

Attempts at mediation failed when FIFA decided to withdraw citing a lack of confidentiality.

FIFA now wants the court to send the matter back before the CAS.

On Wednesday, the parties appeared before the Honourable Justice Carol Gobin after FIFA filed an application on June 15, 2020, challenging the jurisdiction of the Court to adjudicate on the impending issues between the parties.

The TTFA was represented by attorneys-at-law Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crystal Paul and Jason Jones of New City Chambers while FIFA was represented by Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie of M Hamel-Smith and Co.

Hamel-Smith submitted that the TTFA’s commencement of the proceedings before the TT High Court was an act beyond its legal authority and that the TTFA’s commencement of the proceedings before the TT High Court was done without the due and proper authority of those who purported to do so on behalf of the TTFA.

Hamel-Smith also submitted that proceedings be stayed in favour of arbitration at CAS as agreed between TTFA and FIFA. He also submitted that the permission initially granted to the TTFA to issue and serve the originating documents outside of the jurisdiction be set aside as, among other reasons, electronic service of the documents were contrary to Swiss Law.

However, in submissions for the TTFA, Dr Emir Crowne said the TTFA was created by an Act of the Trinidad and Tobago Parliament and so if the Parliament intended to abdicate its supervision and/or jurisdiction over the TTFA- thereby ousting the jurisdiction of the TT High Court- then the Parliament would have clearly done so.

These submissions were made in support of Dr Crowne’s insistence that the matter before the Court posed far-reaching public policy implications of which the Court should consider.

As it relates to Swiss Law, Dr Crowne indicated that the question should not have any significant relevance since the alleged breaches, torts, property rights and other issues affecting the TTFA are all occurring and have its ultimate effect within Trinidad and Tobago, not Switzerland.

Further, he contended that the FIFA submitted no evidence before the Court to support its assertions regarding Swiss Law and the TTFA’s service of its originating documents outside of Trinidad and Tobago.

Dr Crowne also raised the issue of the institutional bias at CAS and whether there was, in fact, an enforceable agreement between the TTFA and FIFA to arbitrate before the CAS.

He submitted that the decision to be bound by the arbitration clause, as FIFA alleges, cannot be said to have been entered into freely by the TTFA given the drastic consequences to the TTFA of not being affiliated or participating in international football.

It will now come down to Justice Gobin’s decision on August 13.

“The TTFA, perhaps like many other stakeholders of Trinidad and Tobago football, patiently awaits the ruling of the Honourable Court in this Application,” said Jason Jones in a comment to Sportsmax.TV.

Prior to the start of Wednesday’s proceedings, Justice Gobin asked whether the parties would consider Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) methods. The TTFA said it was willing to engage in mediation. However, FIFA reiterated that it remains willing only to engage in arbitration before the CAS.

 

Two-time Jamaican Olympian Shevon Nieto has been awarded the IOC President’s Award for honouring the fight and path of an Olympian.

Asafa Powell appeared before the Family Court in Jamaica on Thursday over child support payments. Meantime, Powell has requested that the court order a paternity test.

Powel, 37, appeared before the court after the child’s mother Amita Persaud-Webb filed documents seeking financial maintenance of JMD$25,000 a month.

Attorney-at-law Michelle Thomas represents Webb while Annaliesa Lindsay is representing the former world record holder.

The parties are to return to court on October 9.

Dave Cameron’s vision for the future of cricket involves longer T20 seasons, fewer Test matches for weaker teams but more players earning decent livelihoods playing all over the globe.

 The former president of Cricket West Indies is pushing this vision as he attempts to become the next Chairman of the International Cricket Council (ICC), a platform that will provide him with the opportunity to create a more equitable environment in cricket globally.

 It is a job made harder for not having the support of the CWI but Cameron, who needs two votes to become a contender, is confident that he has a legitimate shot against ECB Chairman Colin Grave and possibly India’s Sourav Ganguly.

 “I have those votes I don’t think it will change. I am still waiting to hear about Ganguly’s future in the ICC. They have not finalised the election process yet,” said Cameron.

 During an interview with Indian Express, Cameron revealed his belief in a longer Indian Premier League (IPL), while noting the irony that the cancellation of the ICC World Cup paved the way for the IPL in the same window.

  “The IPL is way a more valuable product than the T20 World Cup. Let’s be very clear about that,” he said. “India will make a lot more money and so too the players. The players themselves would prefer would playing in IPL than the World Cup.

 “A lot of T20 leagues need to run concurrently, which is not happening now. Everybody wants to not clash with the other guys. The IPL needs to happen alongside BPL, CPL and Big Bash and the best players will get picked in the best leagues.

 “There will be room for everyone including the Indian players who are unsold in the IPL. They have the opportunity to play elsewhere. One has to make a decision on tradition versus profitability.”

 That being said, Cameron lamented the lack of growth in the sport, believing it should be played in more non-traditional markets that will make the sport more valuable for all concerned.

 “We need to grow in China and other places. It is a plan that has to include India. Any globalisation will require investments from India,” Cameron said.

 “A team like the West Indies plays less international games in a year but their players are able to play in the best leagues around the world and then they come to play for the country.

 “That way players make more money, their board will not have to spend money on retaining its best players and we focus on the continuous development of the sport with that money.

 We are living in a capitalist world. We are trying to talk about tradition versus what the players want. The players want to be paid.

 “Yes, Test cricket is great and it is a tradition and it will survive for another few years between the big countries but the truth is smaller counties like Afghanistan and Ireland should not be forced to play Test cricket until they can be competitive. You are wasting resources.”

 He continued: “This thing of trying to do more ICC events is not going to help the smaller countries because there is not enough space in the calendar. Test cricket should be a choice for smaller teams like Afghanistan and Ireland, it should not be mandatory.”

Picked for the Indian squad for the four-Test tour against the West Indies in 2016, KL Rahul played in the second Test at Jamaica and scored 158, his highest Test score then.

In the process, he became the first Indian opener to score a century in his debut Test in the West Indies.

In the first match of the T20I series in the United States, he scored a century off 46 balls in a losing cause, the second-fastest ever and fastest by an Indian. He also set the world record for being the only player to score a hundred in his first innings as an opener in both Tests and ODIs.

Rahul set the record for the fastest batsman to have scored centuries in all three formats in just 20 innings surpassing the record of Ahmed Shehzad who took 76 innings.

He is the first player in T20I history to score a century when batting at the number 4 position or lower (110*). On July 3, 2018, Rahul smashed his second T20 International ton against England. He is also the first Indian batsman to be dismissed hit-wicket in T20Is.

 

Career statistics (2013-present)

Full name: Kannaur Lokesh Rahul

Born: April 18, 1992, Bangalore, Karnataka (28)

Major teams:  India, Bangalore Brigadiers (Urban), India Under-19s, India Under-23s, Karnataka, Karnataka State Cricket Association Colts XI, Kings XI Punjab, Royal Challengers Bangalore, South Zone, Sunrisers Hyderabad

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

T20I Career

Mat    Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50  

42           38           6        1461      110*      45.65     1000      146.10           2         11                        

 

T20 Career

Mat    Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50  

131        118        21         4076      110*      42.02     2908      140.16          3          33         

 

Career highlights

  • 1461 T20I runs scored at an average of 45.65
  • First T20I player to score a century when batting at number 4 position or lower
  • Fastest 50 in IPL history (14 balls)
  • One of three Indian batsmen to score a century in all formats (two T20I centuries)
  • 4076 T20 runs at 42.02

Quinton De Kock grew up as a baseball player and even considered a move to the United States, but his father convinced him to pursue cricket instead.

De Kock was contracted to the Lions in 2012-13 and caught the national selectors' eyes when he starred in a match-winning partnership with Neil McKenzie in the Champions League T20 against Mumbai Indians. He also finished fourth on the first-class rankings, despite playing only six of the 10 matches that summer.

He was selected for South Africa's T20I series against New Zealand in 2012-13 to keep wicket in place of AB de Villiers, who asked to be rested. But he did not make much of a first impression on the international stage. After a lean series in Sri Lanka in July 2013, he was dropped.

De Kock was eventually recalled and hit his stride in the shortest format, scoring his maiden half-century in the 2016 World T20. Along with two contributions in the 40s, he was South Africa's most successful batsman and was named to the ICC's team of the tournament.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Quinton de Kock - South Africa

Born: December 17, 1992, Johannesburg, Gauteng (27)

Major teams: South Africa, Cape Town Blitz, Cape Town Knight Riders, Delhi Daredevils, Easterns, Gauteng, Gauteng Under-19s, King Edward VII High School, Lions, Mumbai Indians, North of South Africa, Royal Challengers Bangalore, South Africa A, South Africa Under-19s, South African Composite XI, South African Invitation XI, Sunrisers Hyderabad, Titans

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

 

T20I Career

Mat        Inns       NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF              SR          100        50             

44           44           5           1226      79*        31.43     901        136.07           0           6             

T20 Career

Mat        Inns       NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF              SR           100        50

184        178         13           5510      126*      33.39     3978         138.51          4         31

 

Career highlights

  • 1226 runs scored in T20I at an average of 31.43
  • ICC T20 World cup team of the tournament (2016)
  • Most runs by a South African at 2016 ICC T20 WC
  • Fastest South African to a T20I half-century (17 balls)
  • 5510 T20 runs at 33.39

Brutal and brilliant, Brendon McCullum is capable of destroying the best of bowling attacks.

A wicketkeeper-batsman, McCullum has been used throughout the New Zealand batting order, but whenever he arrives at the crease it's impossible to look away.

He was responsible for getting the IPL off to an electrifying start, lighting up the tournament's first match with 158 and showing what the format had to offer. And he reprised that style in Tests too - striking the fastest century in the format's history in his final match.

He also became the second man, after Chris Gayle, to score a Twenty20 international century when he brazenly scooped 155kph offerings from Shaun Tait and Dirk Nannes over the wicketkeeper's head in Christchurch in 2009-10.

 

Career statistics (T20s 2005-present)

Full Name: Brendon Barrie McCullum

Born: September 27, 1981, Dunedin, Otago (38)

Major teams:  New Zealand, Brisbane Heat, Canterbury, Chennai Super Kings, Glamorgan, Gujarat Lions, Kochi Tuskers Kerala, Kolkata Knight Riders, Lahore Qalandars, New South Wales, Otago, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Sussex, Toronto Nationals, Trinbago Knight Riders, Warwickshire

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

 

T20I Career

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50         

71           70           10           2140      123        35.66     1571      136.21          2         13         

T20 Career

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50 

370        364           33           9922      158*      29.97     7269      136.49          7         55

Career highlights

  • 6th most runs all-time in T20I, 2140 avg. 35.66
  • 71 T20I caps for NZ
  • Record for the highest runs scored at a T20 WC (123)
  • 1st player to score 1,000 T20I runs
  • Has scored a century in all three formats of the game
  • First player to score two T20I tons
  • New Zealand T20 Player of the Year (2012/13)
  • 3rd most runs scored in T20 matches (9922 at 29.97)

Considered the greatest T20 batsman in history, Chris Gayle has been a dominant force in the format for more than a decade.

He is the proud holder of many records in T20 cricket including most centuries (22), fastest T20 century, most sixes, and highest individual score in a T20 match. He was also the first cricketer to score a century in all three formats of the game – Tests, ODIs and T20.

In 404 T20 matches, Gayle has scored 13,296 at an average of 38.20 with a fantastic strike rate of 146.94. In addition to his 22 centuries, Gayle has also score a whopping 82 50s as well.

The closest batsman to Gayle’s record of centuries in Twenty20 cricket (22) is Brendon McCullum who has 7 and 15 of his 22 T20 centuries have been not out.

Gayle’s success can be attributed in large part to his outstanding hand-eye coordination, which allows him to regularly hit even good-length deliveries for boundaries. No batsman has taken to the 20-over format like he has. He showed early signs of his liking for that format by smashing the first century in Twenty20 internationals - a 57-ball 117 against South Africa in the World Twenty20 in 2007 - and when Twenty20 leagues mushroomed the world over and sought international stars, Gayle was the biggest beneficiary.

Over two seasons - 2011 and 2012 - of the IPL, he became easily the most feared batsman of the league, smashing more hundreds and sixes than any other, by far. When he carted Pune Warriors all over the ground to score an unbeaten 175 in IPL 2013, it felt right that he should finally own the record for highest individual score, fastest century, and most sixes in a Twenty20 innings, because no batsman has dominated Twenty20 cricket like he has.

 

Career statistics (2005-present)

Full Name: Christopher Henry Gayle

Born: September 21, 1979, Kingston, Jamaica (40)

Major teams:  West Indies, Balkh Legends, Barisal Burners, Chattogram Challengers, Chittagong Vikings, D Ganga's XI, Dhaka Gladiators, Dolphins, Hooper XI, ICC World XI, Jacobs XI, Jacques Kallis Invitational XI, Jamaica, Jamaica Tallawahs, Jozi Stars, Karachi Kings, Kings XI Punjab, Kolkata Knight Riders, Lahore Qalandars, Lions, Marylebone Cricket Club, Matabeleland Tuskers, Melbourne Renegades, Rangpur Riders, Royal Challengers Bangalore, RR Sarwan's XI, Somerset, St Kitts and Nevis Patriots, Stanford Superstars, Sydney Thunder, Vancouver Knights, West Indies Under-19s, Western Australia, Worcestershire.

Batting style: Left-hand bat

 

T20I Career (West Indies)

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50         

58           54           4             1627      117        32.54     1139      142.84   2            13

 

T20 Career

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50         

404        396        48           13296    175*      38.20     9048      146.94   22          82

Career highlights:

  • Most runs in T20 cricket (13,296 at 38.20)
  • Most runs by a West Indian in T20Is (1627r- avg. 32.54)
  • Most centuries in T20 cricket (22)
  • Most runs in a T20 match innings (175*)
  • Fastest century in any official format of the game (30 balls)
  • IPL player of the tournament 2011
  • IPL Orange cap winner for most runs 2011 & 12
  • Has scored a century in all 3 formats of the game (two T20I tons)

West Indies captain has fallen two places in the latest ICC Test bowling rankings released Wednesday following his side’s massive loss to England in the third and final match in the #Raisethebat series.

The West Indies lost the series 2-1 and relinquished the Wisden Trophy they won in the Caribbean in early 2019.

Holder’s ranking took a hit after his underwhelming showing at Old Trafford where he took only two wickets for 107 runs as the West Indies fell to defeat by 269 runs.

At the end of the second Test that was also played at Old Trafford, Holder had 834 ranking points. However, having underperformed with the ball in the final Test, the Barbadian lost 24 ranking points, which triggered his fall down the rankings.

However, he maintains his number 2 ranking in the all-rounder rankings behind England’s Ben Stokes.

Meanwhile, Kemar Roach, who took his 200th Test wicket in the final Test in which he snared four wickets, collected four ranking points to move up a spot from 16th in the rankings.

Shannon Gabriel holds firm at 19. Chase is at 31.

Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson-Herah has been confirmed to race at the Herculis Diamond League meeting in Monaco on August 14.

After a season battling injuries in 2019, Nathon Allen seems to be on the mend and relishing the feeling.

Rebounding from a year when she was plagued by injury Jamaican 400-metre hurdler made a triumphant return to the track on the weekend, winning the rarely run 300-metre hurdles at the American Track League meeting at Life University in Marietta, Georgia.

With her 10.98/21.98 sprint double at the Back to the Track: Clermont meeting in Florida, Shaunae Miller-Uibo was the toast of the track and field world last weekend.

President of the Cayman Islands Athletics Association (CIAA) Lance Barnes is hoping to settle matters concerning money owed to a number of Caribbean athletics federations that sent athletes to the 2019 Carfita Games by next month.

It’s been a week. Seven days or more than 10, 080 minutes since Michael Norman of the USA dropped a personal best of 9.86s at the AP Ranch High-Performance Invitational in Fort Worth, Texas.

It was an amazing performance by Norman, especially considering that he is a quarter-miler. It is even more amazing when you realize that Norman last ran a 100m in April 16, 2016, four years and three months ago.

Now, these observations are not to cast any doubts about the legitimacy of Norman’s time. In fact, I celebrate it. I like seeing new talent emerge; new exciting talent like Norman who many believe could be the man to break the 43-second barrier in the 400m.

I made the observation because over the past week I was waiting for one Carl Lewis to say whether he believes the time is suspicious because Norman’s previous best was 0.41 seconds slower than the time he ran in Texas last week Monday.

About 12 years ago, another talented sprinter that goes by the name of Usain Bolt secured the first of eight Olympic gold medals when he won the blue-ribbon sprint in Beijing in an astounding 9.69s. Lewis was quick to try to discredit Bolt’s achievement.

“…For someone to run 10.03 one year and 9.69 the next, if you don’t question that in a sport that has the reputation it has right now, you’re a fool. Period,” Lewis told Sports Illustrated magazine in 2008.

Back when Bolt dropped his 9.69 world record during the Beijing, Olympics, he had managed to shave 0.34 seconds off his previous personal best. If my memory serves me, he clocked 10.03 at GC Foster and then a couple of weeks later, he lowered his personal best to 9.76s at the Jamaica Invitational at the National Stadium in May that year.

He would run a 9.94 in Trinidad before heading to New York where he lowered his PB to 9.72, a new world record. He then shaved a further 0.03s off while winning in Beijing.

Like Norman, Bolt was a 200/400m man before he attempted the 100m. Before Bolt had transitioned from the junior ranks, he had run a World U20 200m record of 19.93 that still stands today. That was 2004. Since that time, Bolt had season-best times of 19.99 in 2005, 19.88 in 2006, and 19.75 in 2007;  time that indicated that by the time 2008 rolled around, Bolt was already capable of breaking 10 seconds.

Norman ran 19.70 in July 2019, while defeating Noah Lyles in an epic battle at the Diamond League meeting in Rome, 43.45 to open in 2019 as well as 43.61 while winning the NCAA Division 1 title for USC in 2018. Like with Bolt, the times suggest that Norman was already capable of breaking 10 seconds over the 100m.

So, to me, when Norman shaved a whopping 0.41 seconds off his previous best when he ran that 100m in Texas last week, it really wasn’t a surprise. However, we are still waiting to hear something from Lewis whether or not we are all fools not to suspect the young American.

That to me is where Lewis’ ignorance and hypocrisy are exposed.

To people like Lewis, the factors that lead to Bolt’s fast times were never taken into consideration. In his mind, someone like Bolt from a Third World country like Jamaica could not possibly run as fast without some kind of pharmaceutical assistance.

His silence now since Norman’s amazing run lays bare his true motivations when he spoke with Sports Illustrated 12 years ago.

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