Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

Sir Richard Hadlee was a bowler of unparalleled skill. He moved the ball both ways, in the air and off the pitch and could hit any crack in a pitch from 17 yards with a consistency that was almost robotic.

Hadlee improved at everything he did. Initially he was not the best at the ODI game, but over time he would improve to the point where Only Joel Garner, Dennis Lillee and Michael Holding could boast better averages than he did.

At the 1983 World Cup, Hadlee’s last, the New Zealand paceman conceded just 2.88 runs per over in 13 matches.

In his first 34 ODIs Hadlee only took 38 wickets at an average of 27.89 and a woeful strike rate of 50.5.

But from January 1982 until the end of his career in 1990, the pacer bowled in 81 matches. Over that period he took 120 wickets at an average of 19.55 and with a strike rate of 35.5.

  

Career Statistics

Full name: Richard John Hadlee

Born: July 3, 1951 (age 68), St Albans, Christchurch, Canterbury

Major teams: New Zealand, Canterbury, Marylebone Cricket Club, New Zealand Invitation XI, Nottinghamshire, Tasmania

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

Height: 6 ft 1 in

 

ODI Career:   New Zealand (1973-1990)

Mat    Inns    Balls    Runs   Wkts   BBI     BBM      Ave    Econ   SR    4w     5w     10w

115    112       6182   3407    158    5/25      5/25     21.56   3.30   39.1    1       5         0

 

Career Highlights

  • Captured 158 wickets from 115 matches at an average of 21.56
  • Took five 5-wicket hauls in ODIs
  • 1st player to 1000 runs and 100 wickets in ODIs

Glenn McGrath’s final One-Day International was the final of the ICC Cricket World Cup in the Caribbean. Australia won that World Cup and McGrath was named its Man of the Tournament.

McGrath went out at the top, having claimed 381 scalps in 250 games at an average of 22.02.

His strike rate of 34 and his economy rate of 3.88 in a time made for batting puts him firmly as one of the greatest bowlers of all time. In Australia, that honour has always belonged to Dennis Lillee but today, McGrath joins that conversation, no doubt.

At that 2007 World Cup McGrath bagged 26 wickets, the moment made more spectacular because he had just returned from caring for his wife, who was battling cancer. She would succumb to her fight with cancer in 2008.

McGrath was adept at bowling that ‘nagging’ length where batsmen could not go forward or hop onto the backfoot. He would hit that spot for days if his body could manage to keep up. And batsmen had to be content with scoring from other bowlers or risk heading back to the pavilion for an early shower.

Playing against Namibia in 2003, the World Cup rookies had not yet understood that McGrath was a bowler best left alone for as long as possible and as often as possible. That naivety brought a World Cup record for McGrath, his 7-15 marking the best-ever figures at the tournament.

So on song was McGrath on that day in 2003 that at one point Australia had three slips and two gullies to the paceman’s bowling.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Glenn Donald McGrath

Born: February 9, 1970 (50), Dubbo, New South Wales

Major teams: Australia, Delhi Daredevils, ICC World XI, Middlesex, New South Wales, Worcestershire

Playing role: Bowler

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

Height: 1.95 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (1993-2007)

Mat    Inns    Balls       Runs     Wkts     BBI     BBM       Ave      Econ   SR       4w     5w     10w

250      248     12970    8391         381    7/15     7/15       22.02   3.88     34.0      9        7          0

 

Career Highlights

  • Claimed 381 wickets at an average of 22.02
  • Most wickets by an Australian in ODIs
  • Most wickets in CWC history (71)
  • Best average in CWC history with minimum 1000 balls (18.19)
  • 7 for 15 against Namibia in 2003 is best ever CWC figures
  • Took a wicket with last ball of Test, ODI & T20I careers

Control is one of the hallmarks of a good fast bowler. Add pace to that and you have the ingredients for a great fast bowler. Add pace to that and you have Australia’s, Brett Lee.

Brett Lee is tied with Glen McGrath for having taken the most wickets in ODIs by an Australian. But to prove the point about pace and control being the hallmarks of greatness, while it took McGrath 249 ODI matches to clock his 380 wickets, Lee did so in just 219 when he dismissed England’s Ian Bell at Lord’s.

On the way to those 380 wickets at an average of 23.36, Lee had to suffer through numerous injury setbacks and quit Test cricket two years before he called time on his international career in a bid to extend his run in the shorter versions of the game.

In truth, Lee also wanted the freedom to bowl fast, knowing he had a maximum of 10 overs to get through. At his best, he would begin bowling the new ball and getting prodigious outswing. When the ball got a little older, Batsmen had to watch their toes as a man who could get up to 160 clicks, was now bowling rapid reverse swing.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Brett Lee

Born: November 8, 1976 (43), Wollongong, New South Wales

Major teams: Australia, Kings XI Punjab, Kolkata Knight Riders, New South Wales, Otago, Sydney Sixers, Wellington

Playing role: Bowler

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

Height: 1.87 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (2000-2012)

Mat    Inns    Balls     Runs          Wkts   BBI      BBM     Ave      Econ    SR      4w     5w     10

221      217    11185   8877             380    5/22    5/22      23.36   4.76     29.4     14        9       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Secured 380 wickets at 23.36
  • 8th on all-time ODI wicket-taking list
  • 5th fastest to 100 ODI wickets (55th match)
  • Part of Australia’s 2003 ICC CWC winning team

Curtly Ambrose was fast and standing at 6 ft 8 ins, he created steep bounce from just back of a length. Nobody, but nobody found it easy to deal with the pacer, even when much of the pace had gone close to the end of a 12-year career with the West Indies.

The difficulty with negotiating Ambrose’s awkward bounce meant the ODI game was suited to him since batsmen had to go looking for quick runs but against Sir Curtly, that may be to your peril. But Curtly, who didn’t depend much on swing, also had cutters off the pitch, both inward and outward.

The angle he bowled from lent itself naturally to the ball darting in and then holding its line after pitching, bringing the outside edge of the bat into play. However, you would be wrong to think this was always going to happen, as Sir Curtly was also notorious for getting the ball to jag back prodigiously from outside off stump. That would create many instances of batsmen dragging on, or just getting bowled. Then there was his yorker. An expert at delivering it, the ball coming from 10 feet up was notoriously difficult to negotiate.

Sir Curtly was also very accurate, and so often, when he would take wickets, they would be taken in bunches because new batsmen got no wayward deliveries or warm-ups they could leave alone until they get their eye in. Sir Curtly was interested in getting you to play.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Curtly Elconn Lynwall Ambrose

Born: September 21, 1963 (56), Swetes Village, Antigua

Major teams: West Indies, Leeward Islands, Northamptonshire, UWI Vice Chancellor's Celebrity XI, West Indies Masters

Playing role: Bowler

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

ODI Career: West Indies (1988-2000)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs    Wkts   BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ    SR       4w     5w     10w

176      175    9353    5429     225    5/17    5/17     24.12   3.48     41.5       6        4        0

 

Career Highlights

  • Captured 225 wickets at 24.12
  • Took four 5-wicket hauls in ODIs
  • 2nd most wickets by a West Indian in ODIs

Coming from great cricket stock through his Dad, Peter Pollock who bowled for South Africa through the 1960s and his uncle, Graeme Pollock, who many regard, despite him having few opportunities to prove it, as the finest left hander the game has seen, Shaun Pollock was almost expected to be a good cricketer.

He was.

Shaun could bat a bit but it was as a fast-medium bowler that he really excelled.

Partnering with Allan Donald, who was a few yards quicker, Pollock helped South Africa to become one of the most dangerous bowling and fielding unites in One-Day International cricket.

Pollock’s attributes were his doggedness and his willingness to do the hard yards that came with running in and putting the ball on a good spot outside off stump, not too close to the batsman for him to come onto the front foot and not so far back that he could afford to hang bat and wait either. The corridor of uncertainty was Pollock’s best friend.

But from that length, Pollock was able to create even more uncertainty with the fact he was able to move the ball in both directions.

Pollock has amost 393 ODI wickets at an average of 24.50. It is no wonder he makes a list of all-time great ODI players.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Shaun Maclean Pollock

Born: July 16, 1973 (46), Port Elizabeth, Cape Province

Major teams: South Africa, Africa XI, Dolphins, Durham, ICC World XI, KwaZulu-Natal, Mumbai Indians, Natal, Warwickshire

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

 

ODI Career: South Africa (1996-2008)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs          Wkts   BBI     BBM          Ave    Econ   SR          4w     5w     10w

303    297    15712          9631 393    6/35          6/35 24.50 3.67          39.9   12     5          0

 

Career Highlights

  • Secured 393 wickets at an average of 24.50
  • 6th most wickets in ODIs
  • Most ODI wickets at home (193)
  • Took five 5-wicket hauls in ODIs

Shane Bond could have been the greatest bowler New Zealand ever produced had he the body for it. Unfortunately, the fearsome quick spent much of his time in international cricket on the injury table, but when he was fit, he was a problem for opposition batsmen the world over.

And that was largely his problem. Bond, who had to have titanium wire fused to his spine and had to manage numerous other issues with his knees and feet, would not slow down and take any intensity out of his deliveries.

Bowling at 150 kph and upward can take its toll on the body. But for batsmen, it meant a ball fighting the friction of the air around it and swinging when it was three-quarters of the way to you. At that pace, there is not much adjusting that can be done.

Bond would help New Zealand to the semi-final of the World Cup in 2007 but even before that his 6-23 against Australia four years earlier in Hobart was a wonderful example of the devastation he could wreak.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Shane Edward Bond

Born: June 7, 1975 (44), Christchurch, Canterbury

Major teams: New Zealand, Canterbury, Delhi Giants, Hampshire, Kolkata Knight Riders, Warwickshire

Playing role: Bowler

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

ODI Career:   New Zealand (2002-2010)

Mat    Inns    Balls     Runs    Wkts    BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ     SR      4w     5w    10w

82         80     4295     3070      147    6/19    6/19      20.88   4.28      29.2     7        4       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Fastest New Zealander to reach the 100-wicket mark in ODIs
  • 3rd fastest ever to reach the 100-wicket mark in ODIs
  • Collected 147 wickets in 82 ODIs at an average of 20.88

If you are named to Australia’s greatest ever One-Day International team, then chances are, you’re one of the greatest ODI teams of all time. Australia are the team to have won the most ICC World Cups and undoubtedly have the most pedigree as an ODI team. Pacer Dennis Lillee played no small part in building that pedigree.

Lillee was considered a complete bowler. Initially, he bowled with frightening pace but a spinal stress fracture, which many thought would have ended his career, only managed to slow him.

Slower, Lillee was still incredibly dangerous. Now he had variations in pace, length and movement and he still was no slouch. Now, in addition to his standard outswinger, Lillee had introduced a change of pace, a yorker, leg and offcutters, a fast bouncer and a slow one to boot.

Those tools served him well in the ODI arena where he took 103 wickets in just 63 games at an average of 20.82.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Dennis Keith Lillee

Born: July 18, 1949 (age 70), Subiaco, Perth, Western Australia

Major teams: Australia, Northamptonshire, Tasmania, Western Australia

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

ODI Career: Australia (1972-1983)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs    Wkts   BBI     BBM    Ave     Econ   SR      4w     5w     10w

63         63     3593   2145     103    5/34     5/34    20.82   3.58    34.8     5       1         0

 

Career Highlights

  • First to take a 5-for in ODIs
  • First to take 50 and 100 wickets in ODIs
  • Named as a bowler in Australia's "greatest ever ODI team"

Imran Khan is the allrounder of choice for the SportsMax Ultimate XI One-Day International team, so says a panel of experts and the SportsMax Zone.

The two have combined to pick the current Prime Minister of Pakistan despite significant opposition from Fanalysts.

According to Fanalysts, Jacques Kallis, who finished behind Garfield Sobers in the run-up to the Ultimate XI Test team, is the best ODI allrounder by a long way.

Kallis’ statistics as shown in the Ultimate XI Profiles are impressive. With a 44.36 average with the bat, 17 centuries and 86 half-centuries, as well as 273 wickets at an average of 31.79 with the ball, it is not difficult to understand the fan’s choice.

Imran Khan, on the other hand, averages 33.41 with the bat and 182 wickets at an average of 26.61 with the ball.

The suggestion from the Zone and the panel is clearly they are going for a bowling allrounder with Khan versus the batting bent present in Kallis’ performances.

In fact, Fanalysts do not even have Khan as a serious contender for a place in the Ultimate XI, with Bangladesh’s Shakib Al Hasan, Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi, Australia’s Shane Watson, and England’s Andrew Flintoff, garnering more picks than the famed former Pakistan skipper.

The zone and the panel have continued to play a three-legged race with their voting, so far agreeing on every segment of the XI.

So far, the team of the panel reads Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as openers; Virat Kohli, Viv Richards, and AB de Villiers as batsmen 3-5, Mahendra Singh Dhoni as the wicketkeeper, and Imran Khan as the allrounder.

Fanalysts have, to date, come up with a slightly different team. They too, have gone with Sharma and Tendulkar at the top, but have decided on Lara to join Kohli and de Villiers in the middle order. The Fanalysts are in agreement with Dhoni as the overwhelming favourite for the wicketkeeping position but have chosen Kallis as their all-rounder.

This evening, the panel and Zone will be picking their bowlers so tune into SportsMax at 4:30pm Eastern Standard Time or 5:30pm in the Eastern Caribbean. You can watch SportsMax on the SportsMax app, download it from the App Store or from Google Play.

Remember, Fanalyst votes count for 40% of the overall vote for places in the Ultimate XI. Just go to the SportsMax.tv home page and click on the banner or click on this link.

By the time Dwayne Bravo had scored his first One-Day International ton in 2006, his credentials as a bonified allrounder with real talent and skill had already been understood world over.

His batting has always suggested there was more there but it was his bowling that showed an incomparable depth. He has left many batsman swinging for the fences with full slower deliveries that inexplicably drop from the sky leaving them half-way through a shot and nowhere near the pitch of the ball.

Bravo’s statistics as an international cricketer, though, have been watered down by, injuries, controversy, and the lure of T20 Leagues with deep pockets.

This has meant intermittent international cricket for Bravo, and possibly a place among the great allrounders of the game from the region.

That said, Bravo is still playing and on the cusp of producing figures any allrounder would be proud of.

With a best of 6-43, Bravo has taken 199 wickets in ODI cricket at an average of 29.51 and with a strike rate of 32.7. He only averages 25 with the bat and has two centuries and 10 half-centuries to his name.

If there is anywhere his game has not lived up to its true potential, it is there with the bat. In the field, Bravo is also a lightning rod for brilliant moments. He is fast over the outfield and athletic. He is also a safe pair of hands anywhere on the field and will run you out if you take a chance to him.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Dwayne John Bravo

Born: October 7, 1983, Santa Cruz, Trinidad

Major teams: West Indies, Carib Beer XI, Chennai Super Kings, Chittagong Kings, Comilla Victorians, Dhaka Dynamites, DJ Bravo's XI, Dolphins, Essex, Gujarat Lions, ICC World XI, Kent, Lahore Qalandars, Maratha Arabians, Melbourne Renegades, Melbourne Stars, Middlesex, Mumbai Indians, Paarl Rocks, Peshawar Zalmi, Quetta Gladiators, RR Sarwan's XI, SC Joseph's XI, Shell Cricket Academy Invitation XI, Surrey, Sydney Sixers, Trinbago Knight Riders, Trinidad & Tobago, Trinidad & Tobago Red Steel, Trinidad & Tobago XI, University of West Indies Vice Chancellor's XI, UWI Vice Chancellor's Celebrity XI, UWI Vice Chancellor's XI, Victoria, West Indies A, West Indies Board President's XI, West Indies Board XI, Winnipeg Hawks

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

 

ODI Career (batting): West Indies (2004-2014)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave       BF       SR      100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct

164     141      24     2968      112*   25.36     3606   82.30      2       10      240     58      73      

 

ODI Career (bowling): West Indies (2004-2014)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs          Wkts   BBI     BBM          Ave    Econ   SR          4w     5w     10w

164    150    6511 5874          199    6/43 6/43          29.51 5.41   32.7          6       1       0

 

 

Career Highlights

  • In 164 ODI’s, he scored 2,968 runs at an average of 25.36
  • Picked up 199 wickets at an average of 29.52
  • 1 of 3 players to have 1000 runs and 50 wickets in each format of the game

Lance Klusener’s swing-for-the-fences approach to batting has fooled many into underscoring his technical ability with the bat, while his military medium pace makes many forget that at one time, the big South African once had enough purchase on his deliveries to either bowl you fullish deliveries or have you fending off bouncers.

With the drop in his pace, Klusener, who was a number-11 batsman, to begin with, adapted well, his average of 41.10 suggesting he could bat more than a bit.

He would score two centuries and 19 half-centuries in his 171-match ODI career. But even with his diminished pace, Klusener was a handful with the ball as well, taking 192 scalps in his career at an average of 29.95. On six occasion he had four wickets or more in a match, suggesting he had the ability to singlehandedly generate a favourable result for South Africa.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Lance Klusener

Born: September 4, 1971, Durban, Natal

Major teams: South Africa, Dolphins, Kolkata Tigers, KwaZulu-Natal, Middlesex, Mountaineers, Natal, Natal Country Districts, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rest of the World XI

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

 

ODI Career (batting): South Africa (1996-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave      BF        SR       100s     50s    4s      6s   

171      137     50      3576      103*   41.10    3977     89.91       2      19      293    76   

 

ODI Career (bowling): South Africa (1996-2004)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs    Wkts   BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ   SR      4w     5w    10w

171      164     7336   5751     192    6/49    6/49     29.95   4.70    38.2      1       6       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Scored 3,576 runs at an overage of 41.10
  • Player of the 1999 World Cup tournament
  • Picked up 192 wickets at an average of 29.95
  • He picked up six 5 wicket hauls in ODIs

At no time has Jacques Kallis’ ability as an allrounder and the importance he had in the South African side of the late 1990s and early 2000s been more obvious than was the case when he faced the West Indies in the Wills International Cup.

The competition, which later became known as the ICC Champions Trophy, featured Kallis in the semi-final singlehandedly dismissing the West Indies, first slamming 113 from 100 deliveries before bagging 5-30 with the ball to boot them from the tournament.

He would perform feats of that nature for years to come, and at the World Cup in the Caribbean was South Africa’s leading scorer, notching 485 of them.

But his ODI career, as was the case when he played Test cricket, started slowly. It took two years before he scored his first international ton in the format, scoring 111 against New Zealand at the WACA.

While his strike rate of 72.89 could be higher, it could also be said that Kallis understood that his South Africa needed him to bat that way if they were to do well. His 11,579 runs perhaps tells a better story about Kallis’ importance to South Africa. Add that to his 273 wickets from 283 innings with the ball, and you have the stuff of legends.   

 

Career Statistics

ODI Career (batting): South Africa (1996-2014)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS     Ave      BF          SR       100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct         

328       314    53     11579     139    44.36    15885     72.89     17      86       911    137    131   

 

ODI Career (bowling): South Africa (1996-2014)

Mat    Inns    Balls       Runs      Wkts    BBI     BBM     Ave    Econ   SR       4w     5w     10w

328      283    10750     8680       273      5/30    5/30     31.79   4.84   39.3       2        2         0

 

Career highlights

  • Only player over 10,000 runs and 250 wickets in both ODIs and Tests
  • Involved in 50 century partnerships in his ODI career
  • 2nd player to have 10,000 runs and 250 wickets in ODIs
  • Has received 32 Man of the Match awards in ODIs

There was not much dissension when a panel of experts selected India’s Mahendra Singh Dhoni to be the man they put forward as the Ultimate ODI XI wicketkeeper.

Dhoni got the better of players like Australia’s Adam Gilchrist, the Ultimate XI Test wicketkeeper, and Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara.

The clincher, for both the panel and the Zone, is Dhoni’s ability, not with the gloves, but to figure out what course of action to take in a run chase and largely come out on the winning side.

It was revealed on the SportsMax Zone yesterday that Dhoni has had successful run chases with him at the crease for India 96% of the time. Chances are if Dhoni is at the crease, India will win.

That was more important to the panel than the tremendous glovework of South Africa’s Mark Boucher, or the pinch-hitting ability of Adam Gilchrist. Those two are considered the greatest wicketkeepers of all time. However, the panel believes Dhoni is the greatest wicketkeeper-batsman the ODI game has ever seen.

More important than the panel and the Zone, are the Fanalysts, so says the weighting around the votes.

Fanalysts have 40% of the vote for who gets into SportsMax’s Ultimate XI, with the panel and the Zone, enjoying 30% each.

With that 40% of the votes, the Fanalysts have chosen to agree with the Zone and the panel for the most part. Yesterday was no exception.

In fact, Dhoni’s 46.29% to Kumar Sangakkara’s 17.14% of the votes represents the biggest margin of victory since the Ultimate XI began two months ago.

With that pick, the Fanalysts team so far includes Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as openers, Virat Kohli, Brian Lara, and AB de Villiers as the middle order, and Dhoni as the wicketkeeper.

The Zone and panel, however, have gone with Viv Richards in the place of Lara.

This evening, the panel and Zone will be voting on the Ultimate ODI team’s allrounder, with Fanalysts already seeming to decide on Jacques Kallis.

Ian Healy’s hard work and will to succeed, complemented by an undying loyalty to his teammates made him the pulse of the Australian team from October 14, 1988, when he began his ODI career, until May 25, 1997 when he played in his last one.

Healy was an aggressive runner between the wickets when he batted and despite not having all the big shots, was more than a handful for many a bowler who expected to be rid of the Australian innings soon after he came to the crease.

His quality as a wicketkeeper was always good, bearing in mind the penchant Australia had for finding real quicks for international duty. But that quality was never more on display as he kept wicket to the big-turning Shane Warne. In fact, his very nasal, “bowling Warnie,” became a signature sound, not just in Australian cricket, but the world around. Many young boys can be recalled mimicking ‘well bowled Warnie’ even though there was never another Warne at the other end. The partnerships between himself and Glen McGrath, Jason Gillespie, and Warne yielded many a wicket, the man named to Australia’s team of the 20th century claiming 233 scalps.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Ian Andrew Healy

Born: April 30, 1964, Spring Hill, Brisbane, Queensland

Major teams: Australia, Queensland

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Australia (1988-1997)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave     BF      SR      100s    50s   4s    6s      Ct          St

168      120     36      1764    56     21.00   2104   83.84      0        4    77     5       194         39

 

Career Highlights

  • 7th most dismissals in ODIs (233)
  • Completed 194 catches and 39 stumpings
  • Scored 1764 runs at an average of 21.00

Peter Jeffrey Dujon was as stylish with the bat as he was with the gloves. Many have called his efforts behind the stumps when the West Indies bowled a four-pronged pace attack of magnificent stature, one of the most spectacular sights of the 1980s.

Not usually required to score heavily for the West Indies from his place in the lower order, Duj never scored an ODI century but had six half-centuries, inclusive of 82 not out. Playing at a time when the scoring rate in ODIs was little better than Test cricket, Dujon’s strike rate of 67.51 was not slow, even if his average of 23.15 was a little low for a batsman of his quality. From behind the stumps he managed 204 dismissals, 21 of those stumpings.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Peter Jeffrey Leroy Dujon

Born: May 28, 1956, Kingston, Jamaica

Major teams: West Indies, Jamaica

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: West Indies (1981 – 1991)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave      BF      SR      100s    50s   Ct      St

169     120      36     1945      82*    23.15   2881   67.51      0       6      183    21

 

Career Highlights

  • 11th most dismissals in ODIs (204)
  • Had 183 catches and 21 stumpings in 169 ODIs
  • Scored 1,945 runs in ODIs at an average of 23.15
  • scored six half-centuries in ODIs

“Shabash shabash!” were common sounds coming through stump mics around the world whenever Pakistan were playing. That was because Moin Khan was Pakistan’s wicketkeeper, urging his bowler along with a hearty ‘well done!’. Moin was the pulse of the Pakistan team throughout the 1990s and his influence made them a competitive unit. Batting with the lower order Moin never managed an ODI century but his 12 fifties, including 72 in his final year of international cricket, always seemed to come when Pakistan needed it most. As a wicketkeeper, Moin was sharp enough to snaffle up 287 victims in his 219 ODI games.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Mohammad Moin Khan

Born: September 23, 1971, Rawalpindi, Punjab

Major teams: Pakistan, Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1990-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave      BF        SR      100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct     St

219     183      41     3266     72*    23.00    4017    81.30       0       12     218    61     214    73

 

Career Highlights

  • 5th most dismissals in ODIs (287)
  • 214 catches and 73 stumpings in 219 ODIs
  • Scored 3,266 runs in ODIs at an average of 23.00
  • 12 ODI half-centuries
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