Tottenham have appointed former Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho as Mauricio Pochettino's replacement.

Mourinho, 'The Special One', arrives at Tottenham, who sacked Pochettino just five months after the club's remarkable run to the Champions League final.

Tottenham opted to make a change at the end of the international break, with Spurs languishing in 14th position in the Premier League after 12 rounds.

"I am excited to be joining a club with such a great heritage and such passionate supporters," Mourinho said in a statement, having been appointed head coach until the end of 2022-23.

"The quality in both the squad and the academy excites me. Working with these players is what has attracted me."

Mourinho was sacked by Premier League rivals United in December but the former Chelsea boss is back in management and London, where the Portuguese will be tasked with salvaging Tottenham's season.

The 56-year-old – a three-time Premier League winner during two spells in charge of London rivals Chelsea – saw his two-and-half-year tenure as United boss come to an end amid poor form and reports of dressing-room unrest.

Mourinho, who also won the treble with Inter in 2010 and led Real Madrid to LaLiga glory in 2011-12, most notably clashed with United star Paul Pogba prior to his Old Trafford exit.

The ex-Porto boss had been linked to Inter before Antonio Conte's appointment, while Mourinho was reportedly in the frame to move to Bayern Munich following Niko Kovac's sacking.

A Madrid comeback had also been touted amid Zinedine Zidane's initial struggles, but Mourinho will now prepare for Saturday's trip to West Ham.

Tottenham defender Ben Davies described the Premier League club's decision to sack manager Mauricio Pochettino as a "big shock".

Pochettino was sacked by Spurs on Tuesday after five and a half years at the helm, departing following a poor start to the 2019-20 season.

Champions League runners-up in June, Tottenham have won just three of their opening 12 Premier League games and are 14th in the table.

Davies, who has made just five league appearances for Spurs this season, said he was surprised.

"I didn't really know about it until after the game," he said after Wales' win over Hungary secured their spot at Euro 2020 on Tuesday.

"But it was a big shock. He's been amazing to work with for the last five years and it's a shame to see him go."

Davies played 90 minutes during Wales' victory against Hungary as they progressed from Group E.

Tottenham, meanwhile, are reportedly set to appoint Jose Mourinho as manager ahead of visiting West Ham on Saturday.

Tottenham have sacked Mauricio Pochettino, bringing an end to his five-year tenure in charge after a run of dismal results in the Premier League this season.

Three wins from 12 league matches have left Tottenham in 14th place, albeit only three points off fifth, while they also lost 7-2 to Bayern Munich in the Champions League last month.

Four successive top-four finishes and a Champions League final appearance will be Pochettino's lasting legacy and he also oversaw Tottenham's transition to a new, state-of-the-art stadium.

With the debate sure to continue over whether Spurs have made a harsh call, and plenty of speculation to come over who will replace him, two of our writers argue the case for and against Pochettino's sacking.

Tottenham have got it wrong - Tom Webber

Spurs defied expectations under the Argentinian and he underlined his status as an elite manager by leading them to the Champions League final last term.

While that game ended in defeat to Liverpool and left Pochettino without a trophy, their European run was combined with a fourth straight top-four finish, showing they had a leader capable of taking them to new heights.

However, their transfer business in the close season was a source of frustration for Pochettino, and he made no attempt to hide that.

While Tanguy Ndombele was a club-record signing from Lyon and Giovani Lo Celso provided another creative option in midfield, there were no other additions capable of immediately pushing the team forward.

Spurs let Kieran Trippier go and did not sign a replacement, leaving them exposed at right-back, while Danny Rose was seemingly retained against Pochettino's wishes.

By failing to give the 47-year-old the backing his work deserved, Spurs have now shot themselves in the foot twice and will only have themselves to blame if things go backwards from here.

Tottenham have got it right - Patric Ridge

Given what Pochettino has achieved during his time at Tottenham, the decision to cut ties seems a ruthless one when viewed in isolation, but that would not be taking into account what has been a dismal 2019 for Spurs on the domestic front.

In this calendar year, Tottenham have taken just 40 points from a possible 90 on offer in the Premier League, winning 11 matches, drawing a further seven and suffering 12 defeats.

Their poor form was, of course, masked by an incredible run to the Champions League final, but it is easy to forget Spurs were heading out in Amsterdam until Lucas Moura took matters into his own hands in a match that could easily have gone the other way.

Looking only at their league results this term, three wins from 14 league matches would be enough to get many managers in the top flight sacked. Why not Pochettino? 

While it is fair to say Tottenham did perhaps not back him as they should have done in the transfer market, the club did spend big. It is hard to imagine he did not have the final say on who was brought in.

Was a creative force such as Lo Celso, for example, strictly necessary when it was so obvious Tottenham lacked a quality right-back or alternatives up front – weaknesses that were exposed in humiliating fashion by Bayern last month?

The situation with Christian Eriksen has not helped, but again Pochettino must take his fair share of responsibility; looking back, any players dallying over signing fresh deals – see also Toby Alderweireld and Jan Vertonghen – have been ostracised during his time in north London. Is this the wisest approach when Tottenham have not had the squad depth to be able to cope with key players sitting idly by?

With the Premier League seemingly wide open – at least outside the top four – this season, Tottenham could not afford to delay any longer and, on the back of a five-match winless league run, they desperately need a fresh source of inspiration.

Former Tottenham striker Peter Crouch was "flabbergasted" by Spurs sacking Mauricio Pochettino, claiming other clubs would have rewarded him with a statue.

Pochettino and his coaching staff dismissed on Tuesday with Tottenham winless in their past five Premier League matches and sitting 14th.

But the former Southampton boss led Spurs to their first Champions League final in June, overseeing incredible victories against Manchester City and Ajax before missing out on the trophy to Liverpool.

Crouch, who came through Tottenham's academy and played for the club between 2009 and 2011, could not believe how quickly Pochettino's achievements had been forgotten.

"I'm flabbergasted by Tottenham's decision," ex-England star Crouch wrote in the Daily Mail.

"I know results have been poor and I understand why the top teams act when their potential to qualify for the following season's Champions League is in jeopardy, but it is ridiculous to think Pochettino has suddenly lost his spark.

"He led Tottenham into the Champions League final on June 1. Some clubs, who aren't accustomed to that stage, would build a statue for a manager who took them to the biggest game in club football.

"But all Pochettino has got is his marching orders. I fear it is a decision Tottenham will regret."

He added: "[Pochettino] was the best thing that had happened to them for 20 years. Good luck to them if they think they can find someone better."

Jose Mourinho is reportedly in line to replace Pochettino at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

Toby Alderweireld is sure Tottenham will appoint a "big" manager after the Premier League club elected to relieve Mauricio Pochettino of his post.

Just six months after reaching the Champions League final, Spurs sit 14th in the Premier League following a dismal start to the campaign, winning just three games.

Tottenham are just a win away from the top six, but are 11 points adrift of the Champions League places with 12 matches played.

Jose Mourinho has emerged as a front-runner to take over and Spurs defender Alderweireld – whose relationship with Pochettino was reportedly strained – is confident Tottenham will have a new manager in place quickly, and one with the credentials to take charge of a club aiming to compete on both the domestic and European fronts.

"Spurs are a big club, there will be a big manager for us. Hopefully we know quickly," Alderweireld told Sky Sports on Tuesday, after playing in Belgium's 6-1 Euro 2020 qualifying win over Cyprus.

"It is a difficult situation, I don't know really the right thing to say. It needs a couple of days to sink in.

"I'm 30, and it'll be the first time in my career there's been a change of manager [at my team] so it'll be strange for me. I can't say how it feels. We have to work hard and I think there will be a new manager quickly.

"We have to stay together, change things as quickly as possible together. The strength of our team is the work rate – that won't be changing."

While Alderweireld has been linked with a move away from Spurs in recent seasons, he is proud of what the team achieved under Pochettino.

"I am surprised," Alderweireld said.

"We came a long way together, with a lot of players, achieved big things, you can see from where we've come from before my time at Spurs, we achieved a lot of things together and I think he took the club to the next level."

Dele Alli was one of the first players to thank Mauricio Pochettino following Tottenham's decision to sack the Argentine coach, posting an emotional tribute on social media.

Spurs announced Pochettino's departure with the club sitting 14th in the Premier League and winless in five league matches, but the decision nevertheless sent shockwaves around European football.

Under Pochettino, Alli was handed his league debut for Tottenham in 2015-16, and the England midfielder went on to finish second in the Premier League under his guidance the following season.

Alli has made just four league starts for Spurs this season, scoring two goals, but he went on Twitter to reflect on the lessons learned under Pochettino's leadership following the news of his dismissal.

"I can't thank this man enough," Alli wrote.

"He's taught me so much and I'm so grateful for everything he's done for me."

Pochettino started Alli 28 times during the 2015-16 Premier League season and the playmaker has been a regular in his team ever since, when fit.

The club spoke of a "need to re-energise and look to deliver a positive season for our supporters" in the statement announcing Pochettino's departure, and Alli wished his former boss well.

"Good luck and hope to see you again my friend," Alli wrote.

The Tottenham Hotspur Supporters' Trust (THST) has thanked Mauricio Pochettino following his sacking, while questioning the timing of the decision.

Pochettino was dismissed from his role on Tuesday, leaving Spurs after more than five years in charge, during which he led the club in title challenges and a run to the 2018-19 Champions League final.

Poor results at the start of this season, with Tottenham 14th after 12 matches, resulted in chairman Daniel Levy making the controversial call.

But the THST is not convinced and is worried by the timing of Pochettino's departure just four days before a London derby away at West Ham.

A THST statement read: "We're shocked and saddened to hear our club has sacked Mauricio Pochettino and his coaching staff.

"During his time at Spurs, Poch gave us many of our best moments as supporters, made Tottenham Hotspur a force to be reckoned with again, and forged a strong link with the fans. We will never forget the joy he brought us.

"Of course, results in the league have been disappointing for some time. But many fans thought Poch had earned the right to turn it around in the first sustained period of poor form we've had during his time at the club.

"We now have to look forward and take stock. But there are questions that must be asked of the board.

"The club's statement makes it clear the board has decided to sack the manager and coaching staff. It is their decision.

"We question why this decision was taken at the end, rather than the beginning, of the international break. We question whether the timing of the decision leaves the club with much choice in who takes over.

"To take the decision it has, the board must have a clear plan for what and who comes next. It needs to tell this club's supporters what that plan is.

"And the board also needs to consider its own role in this.

"Is the manager solely accountable? How much has the board's line on wages and transfers contributed to player unrest and disaffection? How much did it contribute to the situation we now find ourselves in? And will it change to help support a new manager?

"We'd like to put on record our thanks to Mauricio Pochettino, Jesus Perez, Toni Jiminez and Miguel D'Agostino for the fantastic football and magical moments they have brought us over the last five years."

Early reports suggest Jose Mourinho is the leading target for Tottenham and would be interested in the role despite his links to rivals Chelsea.

Mauricio Pochettino arrived at Tottenham as the club's eighth full-time appointment since March 2001.

Juande Ramos secured silverware during his tenure, winning the League Cup in 2008, while Harry Redknapp qualified for the Champions League two years later.

Still, they were the good times. Club legend Glenn Hoddle came with great expectations that fell flat. Frenchman Jacques Santini did not last too long. Andre Villas-Boas failed to pan out. Tim Sherwood did make the gilet popular, but Spurs still decided to dispense with his services.

Then, in 2014, Pochettino turned up. The former Argentina international had shone at Southampton, quickly dispelling the doubters who felt Nigel Adkins had been harshly sacked.

There were plenty of positive moments during his tenure, but also some difficult times. Following the news of his departure on Tuesday, Omnisport picks out a few of the highs and lows of Pochettino's reign.

 

LOW: THE ONLY WAY IS UP

"There is an abundance of top-class talent at the club and I am looking forward to starting work with the squad," Pochettino said following his appointment.

However, Tottenham's standing compared to the other big clubs was laid bare in the first month of the new boss' debut campaign. Liverpool were the visitors, with Spurs hoping for the chance to make something of a statement, but Brendan Rodgers' Reds blew them away with ease by winning 3-0.

It was Spurs' first loss under Pochettino and they went on to miss out on Champions League qualification by six points. 

 

LOW: THE BATTLE OF THE BRIDGE

There was no denying Tottenham's vast improvement between Pochettino's first few months and 2016, when they looked to challenge for a maiden Premier League title.

Crucially, though, when they needed to kick on with the finishing post in sight, the going became too tough. Spurs squandered a 2-0 lead at Chelsea in an ill-tempered London derby to come away with a 2-2 draw, therefore securing a famous success for Leicester City.

"It was a good lesson for us, we are the youngest squad in the league, we feel very proud and our supporters need to feel proud too, we have massive potential for the future," Pochettino said in the aftermath. Such was their collapse down the stretch, they eventually finished third, 11 points behind the Foxes they had been expected to catch.


HIGH: SAYING FAREWELL TO THE LANE IN STYLE

Having seemingly established themselves as top-four regulars, Spurs looked to further consolidate their new-found status by moving to an extravagant new stadium.

In Tottenham's final outing at the more modest White Hart Lane in May 2017, Spurs downed Manchester United 2-1 in front of a crowd enjoying both their team's success and also the chance to be inside the venue for one final time. A glamourous new era seemed to be on the horizon, with Pochettino steering the Spurs ship expertly.

The result made sure they went unbeaten at home for the first time in a league season since 1964-65 as they finished in second place. It was a wonderful way to say goodbye to their famous home.

 


HIGH: UNITED FALL AT OLD TRAFFORD

In August 2018, Pochettino was among the favourites to replace an under-fire Jose Mourinho at United.

Pochettino helped inflict more misery on the Red Devils with an emphatic 3-0 win at Old Trafford, a result that also pushed his claims for the job. Kane and a Lucas Moura double did the damage, making it United's worst start to a league season since 1992-93. 

Yet when Mourinho eventually left United before the turn of the year, Pochettino stayed put. Now a free agent, rumours of a move to the north-west will no doubt grow in the coming weeks and months.


HIGH: EURO VISION SECURES FINAL SPOT

After three games of their campaign in Group B, Tottenham appeared on course to slip out of the Champions League. By June, they were appearing in the final.

Pochettino engineered a remarkable turnaround just to make the knockout stages, where they stunned Manchester City in the quarter-finals thanks to a hotly disputed goal from Fernando Llorente in an eventful second leg at the Etihad Stadium.

There was more drama to come in the last four, with Spurs scoring three times in the second half in Amsterdam to stun Ajax. Lucas Moura was Tottenham's hero, completing his hat-trick in additional time to seal their progression on away goals. A jubilant Pochettino shed tears during wild celebrations with his players.


LOW: MISSED OPPORTUNITY IN MADRID

Admittedly appearing in a Champions League final hardly feels like a disappointment during the Pochettino era.

Still, there was an air of frustration at how they approached what proved to be a tepid contest in Madrid, with fans bemoaning an apparent lack of attacking intent as a half-fit Harry Kane struggled to make an impact.

Mohamed Salah's early penalty gave Spurs an uphill struggle and Divock Origi wrapped things up late on. Liverpool had barely made it out of second gear but kept their opponents quiet to prevail in an all-English final that will not live long in the memory. 


LOW: BAYERN BATTERING AMID HOME STRUGGLES

Pochettino had hinted he could leave his post prior to the Champions League showpiece, his future seemingly based on the club's progress in the off-season transfer window.

While new faces arrived, their form in the early stages of the 2019-20 campaign has been poor - and that is putting it kindly. In the Premier League, Spurs have picked up just 14 points, their lowest tally after 12 games of a campaign since 2008-09. There was also a 7-2 home loss to Bayern Munich in Europe, the embarrassment exacerbated by an Arsenal academy product – Serge Gnabry – scoring four times for the visitors.

A 1-1 draw with Sheffield United turned out to be Pochettino's final game in charge. There is still time for Spurs to turn things around, of course, but it will have to be with a new man at the helm.

Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham reign has ended after a miserable start to the 2019-20 season.

The former Southampton manager turned Spurs from Premier League also-rans into title challengers and leaves just six months on from a Champions League final appearance.

However, poor results have Tottenham in the bottom half of the table this term, while they were humbled 7-2 by Bayern Munich in Europe, and chairman Daniel Levy has decided to act.

With the help of Opta data, we study the numbers behind a stint that will still see Pochettino remembered fondly as one of Spurs' greatest coaches in recent times.


293 - Pochettino departs the club fourth on their all-time list for matches as manager, trailing Bill Nicholson (832), Peter McWilliam (505) and Keith Burkinshaw (431).

54.3 - Only Andre Villas-Boas (55 per cent) has a better win rate in competitive games, counting those to have managed at least 50 matches.

202 - Pochettino oversaw more Premier League games than any other Tottenham boss to date.

382 - Spurs earned the fourth-most points in the top flight during this spell, with only Manchester City (446), Liverpool (404) and Chelsea (398) registering better tallies.

1.89 - Pochettino's points-per-game record in the Premier League is second to predecessor Tim Sherwood (1.91). He had led the way coming into the 2019-20 season.

169 - Pochettino reached 100 Premier League wins in just 169 matches. Only Jose Mourinho at Chelsea (142) and Alex Ferguson at Manchester United (162) have reached the landmark faster with a single club.

4 - In Pochettino's five full seasons at Tottenham, they finished in the top four on four occasions. In the prior 22 Premier League seasons, they had only done so twice.

8 - Last season saw Spurs become the eighth English club to reach the final of the European Cup / Champions League.

2 - Tottenham lost both of their major finals under Pochettino, suffering defeat in the 2014-15 EFL Cup decider as well as last term's Champions League final loss to Liverpool.

36 - Despite reaching the final last season, Spurs have conceded more Champions League goals since the start of the 2017-18 campaign than any other team.

18 - Tottenham's domestic form has been a concern throughout 2019. They have lost 18 times in all competitions in this calendar year, more than any other Premier League club. Their worst calendar years in terms of games lost were 1994 and 1997 (23).

Tottenham are on the hunt for a new manager after sacking Mauricio Pochettino.

With Spurs 14th in the Premier League and winless in their past five domestic matches, the club made the decision to relieve Pochettino and his coaching staff of their duties on Tuesday.

The decision brought an end to a five-and-a-half-year tenure that promised so much but delivered nothing in the way of silverware.

Spurs fans will expect a high-profile appointment to replace Pochettino and get the best out of a group of players that have been inconsistent this season.

In a statement announcing Pochettino's departure, chairman Daniel Levy said: "We have a talented squad. We need to re-energise and look to deliver a positive season for our supporters."

Here are the managers expected to be in contention for the task.

 

Jose Mourinho

It is coming up for a year since Jose Mourinho departed Manchester United, where the man who won the Premier League with Chelsea three times lifted the EFL Cup and Europa League before making way for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.

He has since taken to punditry and his appearances have shown a marked softening in the dour demeanour that characterised his turbulent spell at Old Trafford.

Spurs might be the beneficiaries of Mourinho's new sunny disposition should they give him the task of clearing the storm clouds over Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

Massimiliano Allegri

Having led Juventus to five consecutive Serie A titles, Allegri – who has reportedly been learning English – is a man whose domestic record is difficult to argue with.

The first manager in Europe's top five leagues to win four consecutive doubles, Allegri was a trophy machine in Turin, but he has yet to be tested outside Italian football.

Carlo Ancelotti

Under pressure at Napoli, where he has failed to win any of his past five games in all competitions, Ancelotti might jump at the chance to return to the Premier League.

The 60-year-old guided Chelsea to a domestic double in 2009-10, becoming the first Italian manager to win the Premier League, and since then he has lifted the Ligue 1 title with Paris Saint-Germain, the Champions League with Real Madrid, and the Bundesliga with Bayern Munich.

If Tottenham want pedigree, Ancelotti has it in spades.

Eddie Howe

Bournemouth have been quietly shaping up for a top-half finish in the Premier League table this season, and Howe did his reputation no harm by beating United at the Vitality Stadium on November 2.

The 41-year-old is a former Bournemouth player and loyal servant as manager for seven years, so he would not leave the club on a whim, but the offer of a long-term project at a club the size of Tottenham might be the right sort of opportunity.

Rafael Benitez

Former Chelsea and Liverpool boss Benitez has the sort of record in the Premier League and Europe that might appease Tottenham fans, should Levy try to pry the Spaniard away from Chinese Super League club Dalian Yifang.

Levy will want a manager who can turn Spurs' fortunes around quickly and Benitez reached 100 wins with Liverpool in 181 Premier League games – though Pochettino reached the milestone in 169 matches in north London.

Julian Nagelsmann

Since making a name for himself by steering Hoffenheim clear of relegation in 2015-16 and up to fourth by the end of the following campaign, Nagelsmann has continued to win admirers across Europe through the attractive, attacking football played by his RB Leipzig team.

At the age of just 32, Nagelsmann is one of the hottest managerial prospects in the game and Leipzig are second in the Germany's top flight. Any Spurs fans who saw the way they beat Mainz 8-0 this month may well hope he is given serious thought.

Mauricio Pochettino has been sacked by Tottenham after their frustrating start to the Premier League season, though the Argentinian will seemingly have no shortage of potential suitors.

Pochettino led Spurs to four successive top-four finishes in the league and also oversaw a memorable charge to the Champions League final last season.

Tottenham went down 2-0 to Liverpool in Madrid, however, and with 12 games played in the top flight this term, they sit 14th, having won just three times. They also suffered a humiliating 7-2 home defeat to Bayern Munich in the Champions League last month.

Despite Spurs opting to make a change, Pochettino is still widely regarded as one of the most sought-after coaches in Europe.

We look at the teams most likely to come calling for his services.

MANCHESTER UNITED

After sacking Jose Mourinho in December 2018, Manchester United were heavily linked with Pochettino, but instead appointed Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.

However, since Solskjaer - who was initially handed an interim role at Old Trafford - took permanent charge in March, United's form has been inconsistent to say the least.

The Red Devils have managed just six Premier League victories since Solskjaer was named as their full-time boss and they sit just two points above Spurs in the table.

With a squad still in the midst of an apparent overhaul, United may well now rekindle their interest. Given Pochettino's Premier League experience, Solskjaer could feel the pressure should results not pick up.

REAL MADRID

Real Madrid have also been consistently touted to hold a major interest in Pochettino, with Los Blancos having endured a difficult season in 2018-19 after Zinedine Zidane elected to leave on the back of winning a third straight Champions League.

Zidane returned to the Santiago Bernabeu in March, of course, after a miserable stint from Julen Lopetegui and underwhelming performances under Santiago Solari.

Without Cristiano Ronaldo to call on, Zidane has not had quite the impact as he had during his first spell in charge, though Madrid do sit level on points with LaLiag leaders Barcelona.

Madrid would be able to offer the riches and resources Tottenham never could for Pochettino, but will they oust a club legend to bring him in?

BAYERN MUNICH

Bundesliga champions Bayern were ruthless in their decision to axe Niko Kovac earlier in November and are now on the hunt for a permanent replacement.

Interim coach Hansi Flick has won both of his matches in temporary charge - 2-0 against Olympiacos and 4-0 over Borussia Dortmund - but Bayern might be tempted by the opportunity to appoint a coach with the pedigree of Pochettino.

Like Madrid, Bayern could offer Pochettino plenty of money to spend in the transfer market, though there would also be the added expectation of silverware not only on the domestic front, but also in Europe.

BARCELONA

Citing his loyalty to Espanyol, Pochettino has previously claimed he would not wish to coach Barca - not to mention Lionel Messi. However, should the Catalan giants come calling, it may be difficult for Pochettino to turn down the opportunity to take the helm at Camp Nou.

Ernesto Valverde appeared to be on the brink of losing his job following last season's Champions League capitulation and defeat in the Copa del Rey final.

With Barca stuttering in both LaLiga and the Champions League so far this term, Valverde - who does not seem to be too popular with the club's fanbase - could well be on borrowed time now Pochettino is available.

ARGENTINA

Pochettino may wish to remain in club management for a while longer before moving into international coaching, but the draw of leading his nation towards the 2022 World Cup may be enough to tempt the 47-year-old.

Lionel Scaloni is currently in charge of the Argentina national team, taking the side to a third-place finish in this year's Copa America, though performances have remained inconsistent, with too great a reliance on Messi.

With the Barca forward surely set to feature in his final World Cup – should he play at all – in Qatar, Pochettino may relish the chance to take his country back to the pinnacle of international football.

Harry Redknapp slammed Tottenham's players for "massively under-achieving" and turning in "relegation form" to leave Mauricio Pochettino out of a job.

Spurs sacked highly rated manager Pochettino on Tuesday after a poor start to the season that leaves last season's Champions League finalists languishing in 14th place in the Premier League.

Ex-Tottenham boss Redknapp believes chairman Daniel Levy could not countenance missing out on a place in Europe's elite competition having recently moved to a new stadium, with poor domestic form in 2019 forcing his hand.

"I'm surprised but looking at the form, it's been relegation form over the past 24 or 25 games," Redknapp told Sky Sports News.

"That's where they've been from the end of last season into this year.

"Tottenham not making Champions League this year would be a disaster in Daniel's eyes. With the money they've spent on the stadium and the training ground."

Pochettino's players have failed to match the standards Tottenham set for the majority of his five-year tenure this time around and Redknapp told them they should reflect on the fact they cost their manager his job.

"I think they've got a fantastic squad of players. They've got internationals all over the place – Harry Kane, Dele Alli, Lucas Moura, Son [Heung-min]," he said.

"They're massively under-achieving at the minute. They [the board] have had a look and thought we aren’t going anywhere

"They've pulled the panic button and decided to make the change.

"The players have got him the sack, they've not performed well enough. If they all loved him so much, perhaps they should have done a little bit better for him."

Redknapp tipped bookmaker's favourite Jose Mourinho or Napoli head coach Carlo Ancelotti to succeed Pochettino – claiming Levy will already be in touch with his chosen candidate if his own experience at White Hart Lane is anything to go by.

"They'll have someone in mind, they'll have spoken to somebody. I know how they work.

"Jose Mourinho, Ancelotti, someone of that ilk. They tried to get Ancelotti when they sacked me. I knew they spoke to him while I was still at the club. They'll have spoken to somebody."

"They probably like Brendan Rodgers but they won’t get Brendan. They spoke to Brendan when they got rid of me."

Although he proclaimed himself a fan of Pochettino, Redknapp was only willing to deem his well-regarded Tottenham tenure as a qualified success.

"They've had one Champions League final. If you look back at the run, it [luck] went their way a little bit," he said. "They've not won a trophy with an incredible squad of players, full of internationals and with possibly the best number nine in the world. They haven't won anything.

"Eventually, Daniel and [Spurs owner] Joe Lewis are going to go 'hang on' especially this year when it looks like they aren't going to make the Champions League. These are ruthless business men, they're very, very clever men."

Redknapp then alluded to Pochettino being a one-time target for Manchester United and added: "He was reasonably successful, I like him. I think he's great

"I think he'll get a big club, there's no doubt about that. I know his advisers spoke to another club in the Premier League, it looked like it was a done deal. He'll be in a big job very shortly."

Former Tottenham and England striker Gary Lineker says the club will not find a better manager than Mauricio Pochettino, after the Argentinian was relieved of his duties.

Spurs confirmed the departure of Pochettino, along with his coaching staff Jesus Perez, Miguel D'Agostino and Antoni Jimenez, in a club statement on Tuesday.

The news comes after Tottenham made a dismal start to the 2019-20 season, winning just three of their first 12 Premier League games and suffering a humiliating 7-2 home defeat to Bayern Munich in the Champions League.

Yet although he was unable to win a trophy during his five-and-a-half-year stint in north London, Pochettino's standing remained high after he guided Spurs to four successive top-four finishes and last season's Champions League final, which they lost to Liverpool.

In a tweet, Lineker wrote: "Mauricio Pochettino has been sacked by @SpursOfficial. He helped the club to punch massively above their weight for years. Good luck with finding a better replacement....ain't gonna happen."

Spurs' next game is at West Ham on Saturday. They are 14th in the Premier League, 11 points adrift of the final Champions League qualification place.

Mauricio Pochettino has been sacked as manager of Tottenham, the Premier League club have confirmed.

Pochettino lifted to new heights after taking charge in 2014, leading them to a second-place finish in the Premier League in 2016-17.

That was the second of four consecutive top-four finishes, meaning Spurs became a regular Champions League fixture on his watch and were beaten finalists in Europe's top competition last season, losing 2-0 to Liverpool in Madrid.

However, a run that featured incredibly dramatic quarter-final and semi-final triumphs over Manchester City and Ajax respectively served to distract from dwindling domestic form that has not picked up this term.

A laboured 1-1 draw against Sheffield United before the international break left Spurs 14th in the table, with three wins and 14 points from 12 top-flight matches.

"We were extremely reluctant to make this change and it is not a decision the board has taken lightly, nor in haste," said Tottenham chairman Daniel Levy in a statement that confirmed coaches Jesus Perez, Miguel D'Agostino and Antoni Jimenez would also leave the club.

"Regrettably domestic results at the end of last season and beginning of this season have been extremely disappointing.

"It falls to the board to make the difficult decisions - this one made more so given the many memorable moments we have had with Mauricio and his coaching staff - but we do so in the club's best interests.

"Mauricio and his coaching staff will always be part of our history. I have the utmost admiration for the manner in which he dealt with the difficult times away from a home ground whilst we built the new stadium and for the warmth and positivity he brought to us.

"I should like to thank him and his coaching staff for all they have contributed. They will always be welcome here.

"We have a talented squad. We need to re-energise and look to deliver a positive season for our supporters."

Pochettino's success at Spurs came despite long periods of inactivity in the transfer market and more than a season-and-a-half as tenants at Wembley for home games as their new stadium was built.

Uncertainty over the future of some key first-team stars has lingered over their poor form this season, which arguably reached its lowest point when Bayern Munich subjected them to a 7-2 Champions League defeat at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

Christian Eriksen, Toby Alderweireld and Jan Vertonghen are all out of contract in June 2020 and, despite belatedly getting high-quality additions in the form of Giovani Lo Celso and club-record signing Tanguy Ndombele, Pochettino was seemingly unable to wring any further excellence from a core squad that has been around for the majority of his tenure.

The struggles are of recent months are unlikely to affect Pochettino's stock in the game, with Real Madrid, Manchester United and Bayern having all been touted as his next possible destinations.

Ex-Chelsea and Manchester United boss Jose Mourinho is the early favourite to succeed Pochettino with bookmakers, who also consider Rafael Benitez, Carlo Ancelotti, Eddie Howe, Julian Nagelsmann and Massimiliano Allegri to be in the running.

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