England captain Joe Root feels West Indies paceman Shannon Gabriel "might regret" what he said during day three of the third Test.

England captain Joe Root led by example with an unbeaten century establishing a healthy lead over West Indies on day three of the third Test in St Lucia.

Root became the first England batsman to score a hundred in the series by posting 111 as the tourists built a 448-run advantage over the Windies at the Darren Sammy National Stadium on Monday.

The hosts started brilliantly with Keemo Paul removing Rory Burns (10) with the day's opening delivery, but he was forced off in the fourth over after sustaining a thigh injury in the field.

Keaton Jennings made a start before falling for 23 in bizarre fashion to leave serious question marks hanging over his future in the team ahead of the Ashes.

However, Root anchored England's innings by building a 107-run union with Jos Buttler (56) after Joe Denly (69) claimed his maiden Test fifty.

The skipper opted not to declare before the close, which he saw out alongside Ben Stokes (29 not out) with England at 325-4 and in a strong position to avoid a whitewash.

Burns and Jennings steered England through 10 overs on Sunday, but the former did not last a single ball more with a tame shot off Paul straight to Alzarri Joseph at square leg.

Paul was taken away on a stretcher after pulling up while chasing a cover drive from Denly and Shannon Gabriel (1-87) was left fuming when Shimron Hetmyer put the opener down on 12 at slip – although replays suggested the seamer had overstepped.

Joseph (1-63) followed Paul's lead by claiming a wicket with his opening delivery, though there was an element of luck in Jennings dragging onto leg stump via his thigh pad.

Denly brought up his fifty after lunch with the eighth of his 11 boundaries but his fine knock came to an end after a second wild cut in succession saw him edge Gabriel through to Shane Dowrich.

Buttler injected some urgency but soon settled and overturned a caught-behind decision from umpire Rod Tucker with a wise review before tea.

Root had his first fifty for eight innings off spinner Roston Chase (0-92) but Kemar Roach (1-31) made full use of the new ball by bowling Buttler with a pinpoint delivery.

The England captain punished a full toss from Joseph with a punch back down the ground to reach three figures and cap off a fine day for the tourists that puts a first win of the tour in their sights.

West Indies were dealt a blow in the opening session on day three of the third Test against England, as Keemo Paul was taken off on a stretcher with a thigh injury in St Lucia.

All-rounder Paul, who replaced suspended captain Jason Holder in the team, was chasing Joe Denly's cover drive in the fourth over of the day when he pulled up in pain.

The 20-year-old received attention behind the ropes before being carried around the boundary on a gurney.

A Windies statement read: "Keemo Paul has suffered a right quadricep strain and is unlikely to return to field before tea."

The Windies started the day trailing by 142 runs and Paul got them off to a brilliant start by removing Rory Burns with the opening delivery.

 

England paceman Mark Wood described his five-wicket haul against West Indies as better than taking the Ashes-winning scalp in 2015.

Playing his first Test since May 2018, Wood took 5-41 in St Lucia on Sunday to put England in a strong position in the third Test.

It marked his first five-wicket haul in Tests as the Windies were bowled out for 154, England finishing the day with a 142-run lead.

Wood took the wicket that sealed the Ashes against Australia in 2015, but he felt day two at the Darren Sammy National Cricket Stadium was even better.

"There have been dark days and plenty of self-doubt but I felt like I belonged," Wood told the BBC.

"I managed to take the Ashes-winning wicket but I think today trumped that.

"I have got to back it up now and that is a sign of a true fast bowler."

Wood believes his performance was proof he could deliver at Test level, as he features in the five-day format for the 13th time for England.

"There have been times where I wondered whether I would play for England in Test cricket again," he said.

"I am pleased I have shown people at least for one day that I can be a proper England cricketer."

Mark Wood shone on his international return with a first five-wicket Test haul as England removed West Indies for 154 before building up a 142-run lead at stumps.

With England having already lost the three-match series, Wood was recalled for his first Test appearance since May 2018 and made up for lost time with a devastating spell that included a pair of wickets in his first over.

Joe Root's team had earlier slumped to 277 all out - having started the day 231-4 - but Wood and Moeen Ali (4-36) tore through the Windies and earned England a 123-run first-innings lead.

Rory Burns and Keaton Jennings then saw England to the close with their 10 wickets intact as the tourists enjoyed a rare position of dominance on the second day.

Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes had both made half-centuries on Saturday but the former failed to add to his overnight 67 when bowled by Shannon Gabriel.

Stokes moved on to 79 - his best Test score since he was involved in an incident outside a Bristol nightclub in 2017 that resulted in a suspension - but when his mistimed hook off Kemar Roach was brilliantly taken by a diving Shane Dowrich, England unravelled.

They would add just 21 runs for the loss of their final five wickets, Roach accounting for Jonny Bairstow, Wood and James Anderson to finish with 4-48, while Moeen gave Alzarri Joseph his second wicket.

West Indies openers Kraigg Brathwaite and John Campbell had made 50 partnerships in three of their previous four innings in the series - with the other alliance unbroken at 17 in reaching a victory target - and once again they made a solid start.

Anderson eventually played a part in the first wicket, though as the fielder, flying around from cow corner after Brathwaite (12) had launched Moeen into the air.

Campbell (41) was pinned in front next ball and West Indies soon went from 57 without loss to 59-4, with Wood having an immediate impact.

His opening deliveries, some of which reached 90 miles per hour, troubled Shai Hope and so it was no surprise to see him slice to Burns at gully, the same fielder then hanging to another chance to send Roston Chase back for a golden duck.

Wood's extra pace was proving too much and he found Shimron Hetmyer's outside edge before tea, Root holding on at the second attempt at first slip.

Durham seamer Wood then had four wickets for the first time in a Test with his seventh ball of the third session, Darren Bravo picking out Root again in the cordon.

Keemo Paul (9) and Dowrich (38) managed to take the hosts into three figures, though the former would perish when stumped off Moeen.

Dowrich eventually fell lbw to Stuart Broad, who then took a brilliant one-handed catch from over his head after Joseph launched Moeen into the sky.

That left both Moeen and Wood on four wickets each, and it was the latter who would finish with five as he rattled Gabriel's stumps.

Burns (10) and Jennings (8) then negotiated  the final 10 overs of the day without much drama - though the former almost edged to first slip in the final over - to raise hopes of a consolation victory for England.

Ben Stokes was glad he had not been hasty to undress in the England changing room after he was called back to the middle on day one of the third Test against West Indies. 

Ben Stokes made the most of a remarkable second chance as his unbeaten 62 inspired England's fightback on day one of the third and final Test against West Indies in St Lucia on Saturday.

The all-rounder had reached 52 when he clubbed a return catch to Alzarri Joseph and was all the way back in the dressing room when replays revealed the bowler had over-stepped.

Stokes returned to the fray - switching places with Jonny Bairstow, who had been on his way out to the middle - and along with Jos Buttler (67 not out), guided the tourists to 231-4 at stumps at the Darren Sammy National Stadium.

That represented an impressive recovery from England, who, at 2-0 down in the series and having been put into bat, were toiling badly once again at 107-4 when captain Joe Root was dismissed in soft fashion for 15 shortly before tea.

But Stokes and Buttler came together for an unbroken fifth-wicket stand of 124 as two of England's traditionally aggressive batsmen, perhaps in light of recent criticism of the side's approach, reined in their natural game to guide their team to a strong position.

England recalled Keaton Jennings after he was dropped for the 10-wicket defeat in Antigua, but it was an unhappy return for the opener, who ought to have been out twice before he was removed for a painstaking eight from 43 balls.

West Indies opted not to review when he was trapped in front by Kemar Roach, whose anguish was increased two balls later when Roston Chase dropped a chance at slip.

But the introduction of Keemo Paul - replacing suspended captain Jason Holder - paid immediate dividends as Jennings drove loosely at his first delivery and nicked off.

Paul struck again soon after lunch, Rory Burns falling plumb lbw for 29 to a ball that was crashing into the middle of middle - the Windies needing a review to overturn umpire Kumar Dharmasena's not-out call. 

Joe Denly (20) fell in the next over, pinned by Shannon Gabriel, and England were in strife when Root wafted at a wide ball from Joseph and nicked behind.

Stokes survived an lbw shout on umpire's call early in his innings before he and Buttler set about mounting a recovery, bringing up their respective fifties from 84 and 94 deliveries.

Between those milestones, it looked as though their union had been ended by Joseph's superb catch in his follow-through, only for Stokes to be called back to the middle - a welcome rub of the green for an England side that has been a distant second-best in this series.

Joe Root has told England's players to view the third Test with West Indies as an opportunity to stake their claims for inclusion in the upcoming home Ashes series against Australia.

England have already lost the three-match series after falling to heavy defeats in Barbados and Antigua, with Root's men looking to avoid a whitewash when the third and final Test begins on Saturday.

Ben Foakes has been dropped from the 12-man squad for the game in St Lucia and opener Keaton Jennings could earn a recall having been left out in Antigua after scoring just 17 and 14 in the opening game of the series.

All-rounder Sam Curran, another who has had a poor series, and seamer Mark Wood could also get chances to impress and Root is keen for his men to look at the bigger picture.

"There is plenty to play for in this game especially off the back of our two previous performances," Root told The Guardian.

"There is an Ashes around the corner and it is an opportunity for those guys to show how good they are and put their hand up and put in some proper performances."

It is nearly a year since Wood appeared in a five-day game for England but Ben Stokes' heel problem could pave the way for a recall.

Injuries have plagued Wood throughout his career yet Root is hopeful he can seize his opportunity should he be given one.

"He looks in great rhythm," the England captain added.

"He is bowling with good pace and he has developed his game as well. That is exactly what you want from guys when they have been left out in the past, to come back better players.

"I certainly feel that is the case with Mark. He has not taken the wickets he would have liked when he has had previous opportunities.

"But looking at him now, he couldn't be in a better place to go on and do something really good."

Kraigg Brathwaite will be happy to seek the advice of suspended captain Jason Holder when he leads West Indies against England in the third and final Test.

Holder was banned for one game due to a slow over rate during the 10-wicket success in the second Test in Antigua - a result which secured the Windies' series victory.

Brathwaite is the man to step up in the skipper's absence but the opening batsman expects Holder to remain an influential presence within the home dressing room in St Lucia.

"Of course, he's the leader of the group. His voice will be crucial for us," Brathwaite told reporters ahead of the Test starting on Saturday.

"He'll still be there, we are a family and we'll support each and every one. It'll be the same, obviously I'm captain for this game but he'll be around."

And Brathwaite is all too aware that the Windies can ill-afford to be slow in bowling their overs.

"We have to do that, we can't keep being behind and losing our captain so it's something we have a plan for and we can't let it happen again.

"I wouldn't say it's [just] Shan [fast bowler Shannon Gabriel], as a team all the fielders can get around faster, we have to improve on it."

Asked what sort of statement a 3-0 scoreline would send around the world, Brathwaite replied: "[That] West Indies cricket is strong.

"We're aiming for consistency. We won the series and we're aiming to win the third [Test], we need to be consistent - that's one of the main things for us."

Facing up to hostile spells of fast bowling, being flayed to all parts of the ground and suffering damaging batting collapses - England's tour of the West Indies has been like stepping into a time machine. 

After a series draw in 1974, England endured a dismal run in the Caribbean, managing just three Test wins in their next five tours as West Indies dominated. 

This current Windies crop is a far cry from the star-studded line-up of that era, but they have been mightily impressive. As for England, their pre-series status as favourites arguably makes this dismal defeat all the more deflating, particularly in an Ashes year.

Two heavy losses have preceded the start of the third and final Test in St Lucia on Saturday, meaning the visitors are playing solely for pride while West Indies - without suspended captain Jason Holder due to slow over-rates - are seeking a first series sweep of England since 1986.


THE SERIES SO FAR

It is difficult to decide which was the more resounding victory for the home side. The first Test in Barbados saw England routed for 77 in the first innings and the Windies made a mockery of that total in their second innings, Holder hitting an unbeaten 202 in an unbroken seventh-wicket stand worth 295 with Shane Dowrich (116 not out). 

After going on to win the opener by a mammoth 381 runs, West Indies were similarly ruthless in the second Test in Antigua, bowling their opponents out for 187 and 132. That left a paltry victory target of 14, brought up without loss in just 13 deliveries thanks to a John Campbell six over midwicket.

TEAM NEWS

With Holder absent, Kraigg Brathwaite will lead the side for the fifth time but this will be the first occasion he has done so on home soil. The Windies added all-rounder Keemo Paul to their squad and it remains to be seen if right-arm quick Oshane Thomas will be given a Test debut. 

For England, Ben Stokes (heel) will be assessed and should he make it, Sam Curran appears likely to make way for Mark Wood. Wicketkeeper Ben Foakes has been dropped and Keaton Jennings returns, meaning Jonny Bairstow will take the gloves and could drop back down from number three.

THEY SAID WHAT?

"This series win is a great achievement for us." - Windies paceman Shannon Gabriel. "Thinking back about last year when we lost 2-0 in Bangladesh, we were all hurting. Thankfully, we stuck together and we came out and showcased our talents. This series win has been great and I'm really pleased to be part of it. We have great confidence and we are definitely looking to make it 3-0. We're not just going for the win, we're also playing for the people of the Caribbean and we are also playing for points to move up the Test rankings."

"We've learnt a lot of lessons over the first two games, we could have done things slightly differently." - England skipper Joe Root, speaking to BBC Sport. "We had great success in Sri Lanka and it's not quite materialised here, whether that's down to selection or how poorly we've played in parts, you have to see it for what it is. We've got to make sure we give a very good account of ourselves and the guys given that opportunity take that responsibility and put in a really big performance for their country."

OPTA FACTS

- England will be out to avoid losing three Test matches on the bounce against Windies for the first time since March 1994.
- The Windies have a chance to record a third Test win in a single series against England for the first time since 1998; victory in this game will mark the first time since 1986 that they've won every Test in a series against England (5-0).
- The Windies have been involved in six Test matches at the Darren Sammy National Cricket Stadium in St Lucia, four of which have ended in draws (W1, L1), including their last Test here in June 2018 against Sri Lanka.
- Joe Root has failed to score a fifty in his last six innings, and failure to do so in both knocks in St Lucia will make this the longest stretch of his career.
- Shannon Gabriel has taken 17 Test wickets at the Darren Sammy National Cricket Stadium, five more than anybody else. His Test-best haul of 13-121 came at this venue last year against Sri Lanka.

England have dropped Ben Foakes for the third Test against West Indies, while Ben Stokes' fitness will be assessed, as Keaton Jennings is set to earn a recall.

Jason Holder's suspension for a slow over-rate has been labelled "punitive" by Cricket West Indies president David Cameron.

West Indies captain Holder guided his team to a superb Test series win over England with a match to spare, having secured a 10-wicket hammering in the second game in Antigua.

However, he will not play in the series finale against Joe Root's men in St Lucia, which starts on Saturday, having been sanctioned by the ICC.

The Windies were two overs short of their over-rate target, which led to Holder receiving a one-match ban and a 40 per cent fine of his match fee.

But Cameron believes the punishment handed to Holder, who was found guilty of a minor over-rate offence during the Barbados Test against Sri Lanka last year, sends out the wrong message.

"We will, of course, abide by the ICC ruling, but we have to wonder if such punitive action at a pivotal stage of the series is good for cricket," Cameron said. 

"What a shame if the series is remembered not for the sparkling play of the reinvigorated West Indies players but for a crippling decision made by a rule that ought to be modified.

"Jason now has the opportunity to benefit from resting his body over the period of the next Test and be well prepared for the upcoming ODI series against England which begins on February 20."

Holder has made 229 runs in the series thus far, including an unbeaten double century in the first Test, while the all-rounder has also taken seven wickets.

Viv Richards believes England have been "outgunned" and surprised by the quality of West Indies during their Test series.

The Windies have already sealed a series win over England heading into the third Test, which begins on Sunday.

England have had no answers, making scores of 77, 246, 187 and 132 in two heavy defeats in the series so far.

Richards feels some of the tourists' batsmen have been exposed, surprised by how good the Windies have been.

"You have to look at it in the cold light of day, England have been outgunned. I don't think they expected it. I don't think they ­expected West Indies to be this competitive," the great told The Mirror.

"They have played the better cricket and have been in great form, and it has ­really hurt ­England. The West Indies are bowling at a pace that, whoever you are in world cricket as a batter, you won't like it. England haven't coped at all with it.

"There are some real chinks in that England batting order, and they have been exposed by the pace bowlers.

"They were able to get stuck into the [Jonny] Bairstows and the [Joe] Roots earlier than they would have liked and that can play havoc in the minds of some individuals."

Bairstow has been England's leading run-scorer in the series, managing just 108 at an average of 27.

West Indies will be without Jason Holder for the third and final Test against England after their captain was handed a one-match ban by the International Cricket Council (ICC).

Holder's side recorded a crushing 10-wicket victory in the second Test to wrap up the series, but the skipper has been punished for a slow over-rate in Antigua.

The Windies were two overs short of their target, so Holder will play no part when they attempt to pull off a whitewash in St Lucia and the all-rounder has also been fined 40 per cent of his match fee.

Holder's team-mates were docked 20 per cent of their match fees by the ICC.

The captain was also found guilty of a minor over-rate offence during the Barbados Test against Sri Lanka last year.

Holder has played a huge part in the Windies' triumph over England, making a first Test double century at the Kensington Oval to claim the man of the match award and also impressing with the ball, while leading the side so impressively.

Vice-captain Kraigg Brathwaite is expected to lead the team in Holder's absence, having done so in two Tests against Bangladesh last year while the 27-year-old was injured.

The final Test of the series gets under way on Saturday.

Joe Root implored his England team-mates to take individual responsibility for their abysmal second-Test showing against West Indies.

The Windies claimed the series by moving 2-0 up with just one game to play after a 10-wicket battering of Root's men inside three days on Saturday.

Having made just 187 in the first innings, England collapsed from 35-0 to 132 all out in the second and captain Root acknowledged the experienced players in the team fell significantly short in Antigua.

"Scoring under 200 in both innings isn't going to win you many games of cricket, so we've got to go away, learn from it and come back stronger for it," Root said.

"We just haven't scored enough runs. When experienced players aren't making scores over 50 it makes it very difficult for the rest of the guys around them.

"I think we have got to be better at what we do, or maybe do things slightly differently. The choice comes down to the individual. I can't bat for 11 guys, neither can [head coach] Trevor [Bayliss] or [batting coach] Ramps [Mark Ramprakash].

"There were a couple of disappointing dismissals that guys will have to look at individually, so we go about things maybe slightly differently in future.

"The responsibility is down to the individual, but we will stick together and work on it as a group and try and come back with a really strong response in the next Test."

Bayliss lamented the poor showing with the bat, while praising the Windies' bowling performance, but is confident England can play themselves into form ahead of a home Ashes series with Australia this year.

"It was very poor - the batting followed on from the first game and we just didn't bat very well at all," said Bayliss, who saw England hammered by 381 runs in the first Test.

"It was a difficult wicket to bat on, but we have to find a way and we haven't done that in these two Tests and they did bowl extremely well.

"In Sri Lanka, the bounce of the ball went our way. In this series, it hasn't gone our way, but we have to be better than that.

"There's a lot of cricket to be played between now and the Ashes."

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