West Indies wicketkeeper Shane Dowrich was replaced by Joshua Da Silva after taking a blow to the face on day three as England strengthened their grip on the decisive third Test.

Jason Holder (46) and Dowrich (47) ensured the Windies avoided the follow-on, but Stuart Broad (6-31) took all four wickets in the morning session to dismiss them for 197.

There was more pain for the tourists after England started their second innings with a lead of 162 at Old Trafford, Holder the first to be in pain after being struck on the thumb. 

The captain was able to continue, but Dowrich went off the field after a short delivery from Shannon Gabriel went through his gloves and appeared to hit him in the face.

Shai Hope initially took the gloves before the uncapped Da Silva, who will not be able to bat in the second innings, came on to take his place and soon missed a chance to stump Rory Burns.

England were 50 without loss in the afternoon session, leading by 222 runs as they bid to regain the Wisden Trophy, knowing rain is likely to wipe out day four.

West Indies captain, Jason Holder, has earned the ire of former fastbowler, Winston Benjamin, who has not liked the way he has treated paceman Alzarri Joseph.

According to Benjamin, Joseph has been underutilized by the skipper, making it difficult for him to develop a rhythm and perform at his best.

“It’s not because I’ve worked with this young man, but I think Alzarri has been handled poorly by the captain from day one, not just this series, and just look at how he is being used. Here it is that you have a youngster with raw talent and we don’t have a lot of bowlers with raw talent, but how do you get experience, isn’t it by doing what you have to do?” said Benjamin during an airing of the ‘Good Morning Jojo Sports Show’.

Benjamin also suggested Holder has an issue with Joseph and may not think he is as good as people are purporting.

“If you’re not happy with an individual and you think there is too much talk about this individual and don’t think he’s as good and you want to prove a point, then you give him short spells, bowl him with the old ball when things are tight and critical so he never has a break,” said Benjamin

Benjamin went on to point out that Holder has a responsibility that comes with being captain that, if not managed properly, could be harmful.

“The captain has the ability to make or break a bowler. The time that you give him the ball to bowl, the confidence that you place in him will determine the frame of mind and if you are going to give me two overs and take me off every minute, the first thing I am going to say is that you don’t have any confidence in me so my whole demeanour is now going to change,” said Benjamin.

Benjamin, the mentor of Joseph, was speaking after the first two Tests in the three-match #raisethebat Series currently ongoing in England.

In that first Test, Joseph bowled a total of 31 overs to end with match figures of 2-98, while in the second Test he bowled even less, accounting for 25.1 overs for a match-haul of 1-84. Joseph was dropped in favour of spinner Rahkeem Cornwall for the Third Test which heads into day three on Sunday.

According to Benjamin, there is a certain selfishness in the way Holder rotates his bowlers.

“Now, what I have observed with our captain is that he doesn’t bowl unless things are happening and once things are happening the ball belongs to him and he’s not relinquishing that but as soon as you hit a little rough patch, you go and work this ball for me and as soon as things start happening he comes back in and cleans up. I have seen those things, I’ve been part of those situations many times. I’ve gone through that myself,” he said.

What Joseph needs now, more than anything else, Benjamin went on to explain, is experience.

According to the former fast bowler, who took 61 wickets in 21 Tests for the West Indies, that experience can only be had if the captain allows it.

“You can’t learn experience; you learn skill, you develop skill, but experience is you participating in whatever it is in order to gain the experience.”

The West Indies and England are locked at a game apiece in their three-Test series with England dominating the third.

England, sent into bat scored 369 and after two days of cricket, have the West Indies in a spot of bother, six wickets down for 137.

 

West Indies pacer Kemar Roach is elated to join the ranks of bowlers from the region to have more than 200 wickets in Test cricket but wants more.

Roach earned his 200th scalp when he bowled Chris Woakes, ending day two of the final Test in the #raisethebat Series against England at Old Trafford with figures of 4-72 and in the process helping the West Indies bowl the hosts out for 369.

Roach was the best of the bowlers with his 25.4 overs going at 2.81. Shannon Gabriel ended with 5-77, Jason Holder, 1-83, and Roston Chase 2-36. Rahkeem Cornwall, in his English debut bowled 27 wicketless overs for 85 runs.

“It’s a great feeling. I’ve worked very hard to get to this stage,” said Roach.

Roach, who was at the peak of his powers in 2014, suffered a car accident a number of injuries on his way to recovery, leaving many to believe his career might have been over.

“I’ve been through a lot cricketing wise with my body and injury and stuff so, today it was very heartwarming to get to this significant milestone,” he said, thinking back to his ordeal.

With the worst of his injury woes behind him, Roach is now looking toward the future and seeing how far up the ladder of great West Indies fastbowlers he can climb.

Roach, with 201 wickets in his 59th Test, is ninth on the list of all-time highest wicket-takers from the West Indies. He is one wicket behind Andy Roberts and 34 behind Sir Garfield Sobers.

Ahead of those three are Courtney Walsh (519), Curtly Ambrose (405), Malcolm Marshall (376), Lance Gibbs (309), Joel Garner (259), and Michael Holding (249).

Roach is aware of all the names ahead of him and sees these milestones as important.

“I base my career on milestones actually, 100 wickets, 150 wickets, and obviously if you get to those stages it means you’re doing well so I push myself to the limit trying to get to as many milestones as I can in my career. That is a motivating factor for me,” he said.

“That is a motivating factor for me. This 200 was great for me to tick off but let’s see what 250 looks like, let’s see what 300 looks like.”

The West Indies reply to England’s 369 has not gone well, with the visitors struggling at 137-6. Holder, on 24, and Shane Dowrich on 10, are the not-out batsmen.

The West Indies and England are tied 1-1 in their three-Test series with the next three days set to decide who takes home the Wisden Trophy.

Stuart Broad said he wants to improve in the "frustrating" art of batting after carting West Indies bowlers all over Old Trafford on an excellent day for England.

Fast bowler Broad has been a batting enigma at international level, boasting a top score of 169 and now 13 half-centuries, but there have also been 35 ducks and abundant single-figure scores across his 205 innings.

His 62 on Saturday was bludgeoned from just 45 balls, allowing England to recover after collapsing from 262-4 to 280-8 in their first innings, the hosts eventually posting 369 all out.

West Indies were in trouble on 137-6 at stumps in response, with Broad and James Anderson both returning figures of 2-17, leading to talk of a possible follow-on.

Broad said England "had a great day", but he had an exceptional day.

"Batting is such a frustrating, weird thing," Broad told Sky Sports.

"If you'd told me this morning I'd get 10, I'd have been pretty happy to shake your hand and take it. You end up getting 60 and end up kicking the ground you've not got 70.

"It's the weirdest thing in the world. It's great to get 60, but I'm annoyed I hit a full toss straight down deep mid-wicket's throat now."

The 34-year-old revealed how former England head coach Peter Moores, now at Nottinghamshire, had provided several useful pointers towards Broad becoming a better batsman.

"He came to me in June and said about looking at how Shane Warne played, particularly in the 2005 Ashes when he scored some really useful runs," Broad said.

"It was quite unorthodox and opening up different parts of the field. I looked at that, did a bit research at how he went about it and decided that was quite a good way for me to go, to open up the off side as I look scoring through there. To try and keep my head out of falling over.

"It's really hard to tell in the nets – you need match practice at it – but I felt really comfortable today. The situation helped – it was not one of those to hang around for two hours and see where we went, it was one of those to try and take attack to the bowlers."

Broad succeeded where many colleagues failed on the second morning of the match, before a pace onslaught from England left West Indies in deep trouble.

Having the option to make the tourists follow on in the series decider would be a dream scenario for England, and West Indies will require 33 more runs to avoid that possible fate.

"That's definitely something we will be hunting for, especially with some weather around," Broad said.

"You don't want to read too much into the forecast, but if we got the chance to enforce the follow-on, it would be a serious consideration because we are desperate to win this series.

"If that gives us the best chance to do that, the bowlers will be fresh and ready to go."

Stuart Broad stepped into the all-rounder role as England took control of the third Test against West Indies.

Stuart Broad wrested the momentum of the deciding third test back in England’s favour Saturday by smashing a counterattacking 62 before the team was dismissed by the West Indies for 369 to bring up lunch on day two.

Resuming on 258-4, England lost a wicket in four consecutive overs to collapse to 280-8, with Ollie Pope falling first and failing to add to his overnight score of 91.

The collapse brought Broad to the middle and the left-hander hit the Windies’ bowlers to all parts of Old Trafford, reaching his half-century in 33 balls — putting him tied for third place in the all-time list of England’s fastest test fifties.

Broad’s 45-ball innings ended when he holed out in the deep off an ambitious swept volley, but by then he had frustrated the West Indies and put England back in charge of a series currently poised at 1-1.

His potentially game-changing ninth-wicket partnership with Dom Bess was worth 76 runs, with Broad hitting nine fours and a six.

Bess was left stranded on 18 after Anderson was the last man out for 11. England added 111 runs in the session.

Earlier, Pope was dropped at slip off Shannon Gabriel before the same paceman got one through the gate his very next over.

Chris Woakes (1) then slashed at a wide ball onto his stumps to give fast bowler Kemar Roach his 200th test wicket.

Jos Buttler, who resumed on 56, was out for 67 when he edged Gabriel to Jason Holder at second slip and the West Indies captain also pouched a catch to remove Jofra Archer (3) off the bowling of Roach.

Roach had team-best figures of 4-72.

The Windies, who won the first test in Southampton before losing the second match in Manchester, are looking to capture a test series in England for the first time since 1988.

While Rahkeem Cornwall went wicketless in his first outing of the #raisethebat Series at Old Trafford in Manchester on Friday, his vice-captain thinks the big off-break bowler had a good outing.

Cornwall ended the first day of the third Test, with the West Indies and England locked 1-1, with figures of 0-71 from 21 overs, while England were 258-4.

England’s batsmen, except for an lbw shout looked comfortable against Cornwall’s spin and when Ollie Pope, 91, and Jos Buttler, 56, started coming down the wicket, Cornwall struggled to keep them back in their crease.

Despite the struggles which saw Cornwall go at 3.38 runs per over, the most expensive of the West Indies bowlers, Brathwaite still believed it was a good outing.

“I thought Rahkeem was good. The pitch spun a bit and I thought he controlled the runs,” said Brathwaite.

Cornwall was involved in something spectacular though, a one-handed grab at slip that came from the slashing blade of Rory Burns, 57, off the bowling of Roston Chase.

Chase only bowled eight overs but had more luck than Cornwall, bagging 1-24.

But according to Brathwaite, there is enough there for Cornwall to be hopeful about.

“He didn’t go for too many runs, which was good. It was unfortunate that he didn’t get a wicket but I thought he was decent,” said the West Indies vice-captain.

The best of the West Indies bowlers was kemar Roach, who ended the day with 2-56, while Shannon Gabriel, 0-47, and Jason Holder, 0-45, were not as penetrative as in previous Tests.

West Indies vice-captain Kraigg Brathwaite has backed wicketkeeper-batsman Shane Dowrich to bounce back after a forgettable day behind the stumps.

The 28-year-old gloveman often failed to get things right to start the decisive Test, with a day characterised by fumbles and being wrong-footed.  The Windies managed some control, bar a late run from England, but Dowrich never really look at ease behind the wicket. 

In defense of his teammate, however, Brathwaite was adamant that things were not as easy as they looked and was confident the player would be much improved for the second day.

“He had a tough day but he’s a strong guy so I know he’ll be looking to bounce back,” Brathwaite told members of the media, via a Zoom Press Conference, in assessing the players performance.

“I’m looking for him to improve, it has to be up from here.  We just have to keep supporting him.  Obviously, the ball was swinging quite late so it wasn’t easy but tomorrow he will be better,” he added.

Dowrich has also had a difficult time with the bat for the series, with the exception of a solid 61 in the first innings of the first Test.  The player was dismissed, without scoring, in both innings of the second Test, which England won by 113 runs.

West Indies vice-captain Kraigg Brathwaite points to the second morning of the third and decisive Test against England as being crucial after a partnership between Ollie Pope and Jos Buttler wrested their early advantage on Friday at Old Trafford.

England are in a good position, having ended the day on 258-4, a far cry from the 122-4 they were in when Buttler came to the crease.

Before that, Kemar Roach had removed second-Test century-maker, Dom Sibley, for a duck, trapping him leg before wicket in the first over of the day.

Then came the run out of Joe Root for 17, Roston Chase clipping the bales.

Ben Stokes and opener Rory Burns tried to fashion a recovery before the latter was pushed back with some short deliveries before being bowled by Roach for 20.

The West Indies were looking good with England at 92-3, and when Burns was caught brilliantly at slip by Rahkeem Cornwall off the bowling of Roston Chase for 57, the West Indies were in great shape with two new batsmen and England teetering at 122-4.

But that’s where it ended as Pope, 91, and Buttler, 56, saw out the day in relative comfort, their partnership now worth 136.  

“I thought we started very well. Obviously Buttler and Pope had a good partnership, they batted well and so we know we have some hard work come tomorrow,” said Brathwaite in a press conference following stumps.

While Pope and Buttler have rescued England from a precarious position, Brathwaite does not believe the game has gotten away from the West Indies and tomorrow brings a fresh opportunity.

“We had a plan and obviously to bowl first but it’s been a pretty even day and obviously good from the two at the crease but I think tomorrow we have to start well and look to limit them to as few as possible,” said Brathwaite.

While tomorrow’s morning session is important, Brathwaite says the West Indies won’t panic and will stick to their plans and be patient.

“We have to start well and by that I mean we don’t have to rush wickets. I think if we build pressure by bowling a lot of dot balls and no boundary balls, that will create pressure to bring wickets. We don’t have to rush it in the morning session, I believe once we keep it tight, the tightness will bring wickets,” he said.

Ollie Pope believes a maiden century in England against West Indies will quell any doubts about his ability to play Test cricket.

Pope is nine short of three figures after the first day of the deciding Test at Old Trafford having steadied the ship alongside Jos Buttler (56 not out) in an unbroken 136-run partnership for the fifth wicket.

England will resume on Saturday on 258-4 with Pope seeking a second Test century in his 10th match, and his first on English soil.

The 22-year-old had scored 97 combined in his previous seven Tests against India and West Indies, and feels judgements on him in the longest format have been reached prematurely.

"It would be a massive achievement for myself," Pope said of making a century.

"So far, I think I've played four Test matches before this in England. I haven't scored the runs that I would like.

"People talk a little bit and I've seen some comments but it's not a massive sample size to take it from. I've played all my first-class cricket in England.

"I don't look into that stuff too much but to get over the line would be a nice feeling. Those nine runs, hopefully they will come at some point."

Pope was particularly pleased to return to his Old Trafford hotel room not having to ruminate on a failure with the bat.

Both teams have remained in the bubble throughout the series in Southampton and Manchester, meaning there has been nowhere for Pope to hide after difficult days out in the middle.

"It's a really nice feeling this evening," Pope, who had scored 43 in his four previous innings in the series, added.

"I've missed out in those first two games. We've not been able to get away.

"You are brought back to your hotel after you've got out in the last two overs of the day and you're looking at over the cricket ground, there's no real escape from it.

"You can't go out for dinner, can't go for a coffee, see your family, it isn't easy.

"You can naturally think about your batting, think about your failures a little bit more than normal. To get a few runs today, it is a nice feeling."

Ollie Pope and Jos Buttler made unbeaten half-centuries to give England the edge on day one of the decisive third Test against West Indies at Old Trafford.

Former West Indies opener Wavell Hinds is the new president of the 141-year-old Kensington Cricket Club. Hinds, the president and CEO of the West Indies Players Association was the sole nominee for the post as outgoing president Dave Cameron did not seek re-election.

Hinds was subsequently approved unanimously during the cricket club’s annual general meeting and election exercise at the clubhouse on Thursday, July 23.

Hinds, in his brief remarks following his elevation, urged the members of the club to “protect the assets of the newly upgraded facility.” He also wanted to the club to “continue with its development programs from under 15 all the way to senior”, adding that the club must maintain its core values of integrity, respect and rich in spirit, talent and love.

Hinds also invited with the support of the membership gathered, to appoint Cameron, President Emeritus, which allows him to be a part of the new executive.

Cameron served in the role of president since 2001 and has been a member of the club for just about four decades. In his remarks, he thanked the community, membership and the partners of the club for their support. He succeeded the late Vincent Wong and Noel Silvera.

Cameron is firm in his belief that Kensington can be transformed into a “modern-day sporting organization with a great business partnership aimed at creating world-class players.”

Meanwhile, Hins’ executive that will include  Radcliffe Daley – 1st Vice President;  David Bernard Jr – 2nd Vice President;  Carole Beckford – Secretary;  Guatam Kumaraswamy – Treasurer;   Wayne Lewis – Assistant Secretary;  Marlon Kennedy – Assistant Treasurer;  and Brian Blair – Club Captain.

 Lorna Litchmore, Raymond Smith, Delbert Gayle, Jamie Hay and Ryan Francis will serve as executive members.

During the last three years, the club won three major trophies and are the defending Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) T20 champions. In the incomplete, senior cup competition, the team played four matches this season that was cut short because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

England lost Dom Sibley in the first over and captain Joe Root near the end of the morning and are now 131-4 at Tea on the first day of the deciding Test against the West Indies at Old Trafford on Friday.

It was an encouraging start for the tourists, especially with England being one specialist batsman light for the match after choosing to select four fast bowlers as well as a spinner. That meant star allrounder Ben Stokes moved up the order to No. 4.

Stokes was already in the middle by lunch, but brilliant bowling from Kemar Roach just after had him bowled for 20.

After the Windies won the toss under overcast skies, Kemar Roach trapped Sibley lbw off the sixth ball of the innings from a ball that didn't deviate. Sibley, a century-maker in the second Test won by England, didn't get off the mark this time after playing across the delivery and was so plumb he didn't bother reviewing.

Root played circumspectly for his 17 off 59 balls and was looking set when he tried to pinch a single after Burns steered recalled spinner Rahkeem Cornwall down to third man. Roston Chase threw to the wicketkeeper's end and clipped the outside of the stump, one bail popping up with Root short of the crease.

West Indies paceman Shannon Gabriel started for the third straight match this series and spent some time off the field with an apparent hamstring strain after pulling up during his fourth over. He returned, though, to the relief of captain Jason Holder and was back bowling before lunch.

The not out batsmen are Ollie Pope on 24, and Jos Buttler on three.

The series is tied at 1-1 and the Windies, who won the first test in Southampton, are looking to capture a test series in England for the first time since 1988.

England recalled pacemen Jofra Archer and James Anderson in place of Sam Curran and top-order batsman Zak Crawley, leading to that restructuring of the batting order.

Stokes is struggling for full fitness and is unlikely to bowl, so will be a specialist batsman for this Test.

The West Indies made one change, bringing in Cornwall for Alzarri Joseph.

Joe Root recalled Jofra Archer and James Anderson to an England team a batsman light due to Ben Stokes' injury concerns.

England face West Indies in the third and final Test at Old Trafford on Friday needing to win to regain the Wisden Trophy.

As for the second match, Root has altered his attack, although Mark Wood again misses out.

Archer - unable to play last time out after breaching biosecurity protocols - and Anderson are back, meaning Sam Curran makes way.

But with Stokes managing an injury, number three Zak Crawley has also dropped out to get the extra bowler in, seeing the rest of the order shift up.

That batting order was swiftly tested after Windies captain Jason Holder won the toss and, as in the previous match, opted to bowl first.

"We've balanced the side out as best we can and I actually feel like we've got a very good, well balanced team. I'm not worried about that at all," Root said, before quickly finding himself in the middle when Kemar Roach dismissed Dom Sibley lbw for a duck in the first over.

Of Archer's return, the captain added: "Jofra's ready to play. Over the last couple of days, he's got his smile back and bowled with real pace in the nets.

"He knows he's got the full support of the dressing room and the guys around him. We're really looking forward to him getting back out there and showing everyone how talented he is."

On the possibilty of Stokes bowling, Root said: "We'll have to see how things go. We can monitor that as the game progresses. But we have to make sure we look after him as best as possible."

Stokes - now the ICC's top-ranked all-rounder - revealed he had "been better" and was still unsure of the nature of the injury.

He said: "It's going to be a day by day thing. I was a little bit worried I wouldn't be able to offer everything I could with the ball, especially in the first innings."

The Windies have also made a change, meanwhile, bringing in spinner Rahkeem Cornwall for Alzarri Joseph in a match they need only to draw to retain the trophy.

Rain is forecast on four days in Manchester.

Talented all-rounder Rahkeem Cornwall should shed the excess pounds if he wishes to realize his full potential as a member of a successful West Indies unit.

Now, hold on to your collective horses. Before I get accused of being unfair or picking on the player, or any of the other excuses those willing to bury their heads in the proverbial sand may concoct, as is truly typical of the modern victimhood culture, I must make clear that I have tremendous belief in Cornwall’s potential and ability. 

Regionally, he has routinely performed at a very high level.  He has proven his ability to take wickets for the A-team and had a splendid Test debut for the West Indies against India.  In the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) Cornwall has flayed many opposition bowling attacks.  There should be no doubt that if he continues to work at his game, he can become a quality all-rounder and a dependable weapon for West Indies.  For the sport of cricket, his considerable weight, which in all likelihood kept him from being selected sooner, is an obstacle he must overcome.

The aim of the majority of professional athletes is often to maximize their physical capability.  Surely Cornwall is functional, but anyone who can honestly claim they believe the athlete is performing at his peak needs to take a long hard look in the mirror and consider whether they really mean him any good.  He is good now, but at his best, he could be great. We should therefore never hinder personal improvement by stifling objective analysis. 

While the team’s coach Phil Simmons recently claimed the player’s, weight was not an issue, one does not have to go far to think of instances where it could be.  What about instances in the game where quick singles are required?  His inability to do so is clearly a tactic that can and has been used against the player to the detriment of both himself and the team.  Anyone who has watched the CPL will have seen teams decide that it is the best way to attack the destructive batsman. 

In a memorable 2017 CPL encounter between the St Lucia Stars and Barbados Trident, current One Day International (ODI) captain Kieron Pollard was incensed at the player’s decision to quit after making a blistering 78 from 44.  Cornwall seemed gassed after being earlier hit by a Pollard delivery, but his opponent clearly believed that being in poor physical shape played a factor in his not being able to go on and make a 100.

Why would anyone be encouraged to work on weaknesses in their game and not have prime physical fitness on the list? 

It would be an interesting explanation as to why so little progress has been made after Cricket West Indies promised to put the all-rounder on a special programme, which included a dietician, over three years ago. 

Additionally, with the team’s renewed focus on fitness, which saw them implement the famed Yoyo Fitness Endurance programme that has a minimum score of 40, it would be interesting to discover why Cornwall has been given a pass when other players have been dropped for not making the fitness grade. If the player cannot lose weight due to a medical exemption, one wonders how it cannot be a risk to play competitive cricket.

At 27 years old the player should be at or close to his physical peak, it is surely an indictment to not encourage him to put in the work required to get to the very top of his game.

 

Page 6 of 108
© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.