Stuart Broad hopes he silenced those who had written him off after taking his 500th Test wicket and being named man of the series in England's triumph over West Indies.

Broad finished with match figures of 10-67 after claiming the first and last wickets on the final day of the third Test at Old Trafford, where England won by 269 runs to regain the Wisden Trophy.

The England paceman trapped Kraigg Brathwaite lbw to become the seventh bowler to join the 500 club, a landmark James Anderson reached by dismissing the same batsman in 2017.

Broad took 4-36 on day five and Chris Woakes finished with magnificent figures of 5-50 to bowl the tourists out for only 129.

England great Broad was furious at being left out for England's defeat in the first Test at the Rose Bowl and responded by taking six wickets last week, before claiming 10 and scoring a quickfire half-century in the decider.

He told Test Match Special: "I was really down that week [in Southampton], but I've got some brilliant people around me to pick me up.

"I knew I was bowling well, I knew I was in good rhythm, so it was great to get an opportunity when we got here to have the chance to take some wickets."

Broad revealed he got the answers he was looking for when he spoke to head coach Chris Silverwood and national selector Ed Smith after being omitted for the opening Test and was fuelled to prove a point in Manchester.

"I had a really good chat with Silverwood and Ed Smith. To be honest it was always unrealistic to expect any seamer would play all six of these Test matches this summer with them being back-to-back and workloads," he said.

"I was just disappointed I wasn't chosen for that first game, but I sort of knew deep down I would get an opportunity.

"If I get challenged or I feel like there is a bit of a point to prove, I'm a competitive person anyway, but I came to Manchester with the bit between my teeth and it does feel really good to have been able to put some performances in.

"I think it's not as if the management staff are thinking that I couldn't do it anymore, because my record over the last 18 months particularly has been pretty strong, but it's always good to be on winning sides for England and to have contributed to winning Test matches.

"When you cross 30 it's easy to write you off, when you are 34 it's much easier to write you off, but I hope I've quietened the writers-off a little bit."

Stuart Broad took his 500th Test wicket and Chris Woakes also starred as England thrashed West Indies by 269 runs to regain the Wisden Trophy on the final day of the series at Old Trafford.

Broad started day five needing just one wicket to become the seventh player to reach the landmark and achieved the feat by removing Kraigg Brathwaite, the same batsman James Anderson dismissed to join the 500 club in 2017.

Pace great Broad, dropped for the first Test in Southampton, then took the series-clinching wicket to finish with 4-36 after the brilliant Woakes claimed 5-50 to bowl the tourists out for only 129.

Broad, who took match figures of 10-67 and smashed a half-century, and Woakes sat out a first match of the series that the Windies won at the Rose Bowl, but showed what England were missing in Manchester.

The Windies head home on Wednesday, still without a Test series win in England since 1988 after losing a contest to be renamed the Richards-Botham Trophy when they next do battle. 

Shai Hope and Brathwaite got the Windies off to an encouraging start after resuming on 10-2 following a day-four washout, but Broad ended a 39-run stand by trapping the opener bang in front to join the 500 club after a rain delay.

Broad remained in the thick of the action, running in from mid-off to catch Hope (31) and Sharmah Brooks edged behind (22) to become Woakes' second victim.

Rain ensured early lunch was taken with the Windies in deep trouble on 84-5 and Dom Bess - who did not bowl a ball in the match - ran Roston Chase out before another shower took the players off again.

Captain Jason Holder, Shane Dowrich - who took a nasty blow to the face while wicketkeeper - and Rahkeem Cornwall were snared lbw in a devastating spell from Woakes.

Broad fittingly finished it off, Jos Buttler taking an excellent catch down the leg side to dismiss Jermaine Blackwood and give England's man of the moment 10 wickets in a Test for the third time.

 

Broad goes from seething in Southampton to main man in Manchester

Broad was furious after being left out for the first match of the series and could only watch on as the Windies took a 1-0 lead in Southampton.

The paceman has let his performances do the talking in the remainder of the series, playing a major part in England's turnaround with bat and ball.

His dismissal of Brathwaite saw him become the fourth seamer - and the second-youngest bowler behind Muttiah Muralitharan - to claim 500 Test scalps and he put the icing on the cake by taking the last wicket with his first ball of a new spell.

 

Hope fails to live up to expectations

It was an all too familiar story for Hope on the last day of what has been a poor tour for a batsman who has not shown what he is capable of.

Hope played positively as he made his highest score of the series, hitting six boundaries before throwing his wicket away attempting to dispatch Woakes for a seventh.

The number three heads home without making a half-century three years after making a century in both innings at Headingley. He has not reached three figures in a Test since that famous win in Leeds.

 

Woakes makes his mark

Woakes was also omitted for the defeat at the Rose Bowl and has responded impressively. 

He took five wickets in the second Test and added another in the first innings this week before ending the series on a high note.

The all-rounder was on the money on the final day, rewarded for consistently bowling on a probing line and length with a fourth five-wicket Test haul.

Stuart Broad dismissed Kraigg Brathwaite on the final day of the third Test against West Indies to reach the milestone of 500 Test wickets. 

The seamer trapped opener Brathwaite lbw for 19 in the morning session to aid England's push for victory at Old Trafford, the hosts having been frustrated by bad weather on Monday as play was washed out.

Broad is the seventh bowler to make it to the notable landmark, doing so in his 140th appearance in the longest format of the game. 

The 34-year-old was surprisingly left out by the hosts for the opener in Southampton – a game West Indies won by four wickets – but marked his recall with match figures of 6-108 in the second Test in Manchester. 

He continued his impressive form with a six-wicket haul in the first innings of the series finale, putting his side in complete control having also contributed 62 with the bat.  

Only long-time new-ball partner James Anderson – who also dismissed Brathwaite to reach 500 in 2017 – has managed more wickets for England, while Broad has West Indies legend Courtney Walsh (519) in his sights. 

Glenn McGrath is the leading fast bowler with 563 wickets, but the top three on the prestigious list are all spinners. Anil Kumble managed 619, Shane Warne sits second with 708 and Muttiah Muralitharan is top of the pile by a distance, the Sri Lankan ending his career on exactly 800.

Wahab Riaz has been named in Pakistan's 20-man squad for the upcoming Test series against England.

The tourists have whittled down their 29-man touring party for the three-match campaign, which begins on August 5 at Old Trafford.

Riaz, 35, is in line for a first Test appearance since October 2018 following his decision last year to take an indefinite break from the format.

Azhar Ali will captain the group, with Babar Azam taking the role of his deputy.

The remaining nine players who flew to England last month will stay on, with many likely to feature during the T20I series which follows the Tests.

The squad in full:

Azhar Ali (captain), Babar Azam (vice-captain), Abid Ali, Asad Shafiq, Faheem Ashraf, Fawad Alam, Imam ul Haq, Imran Khan Snr, Kashif Bhatti, Mohammad Abbas, Mohammad Rizwan, Naseem Shah, Sarfaraz Ahmed, Shadab Khan, Shaheen Shah Afridi, Shan Masood, Sohail Khan, Usman Shinwari, Wahab Riaz, Yasir Shah.

Rain held up England's victory charge as no play was possible on day four of the Test series decider against West Indies at Old Trafford.

The Windies were due to resume on 10-2 after being set a highly improbable 399 to win, Stuart Broad having taken six wickets on Sunday to take his tally in the longest format to 499.

A bleak Monday in Manchester prevented a ball from being bowled, so Joe Root's side must hope they will have enough time to regain the Wisden Trophy on the final day.

Scattered showers are forecast for Tuesday, but the outlook is more positive than on a grim penultimate day.

Shai Hope and Kraigg Brathwaite were unbeaten at stumps on a one-sided third day after Broad removed John Campbell and nightwatchman Kemar Roach.

England paceman Broad finished with magnificent first-innings figures of 6-31 in the morning session after bludgeoning a rapid half-century on Saturday.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has officially launched the inaugural ICC Men's Cricket World Cup Super League, starting with England's one-day series against Ireland.

Introduced to help bring context to 50-over cricket at the highest level, the Super League will be used as a qualification system for the next ICC World Cup, scheduled for 2023 in India.

There will be 13 teams involved – the 12 full members, as well as the Netherlands – and the top seven in the final table will automatically secure their place at the global tournament, the ICC confirmed in a statement.

All sides will play four series at home and away, with each consisting of three matches.

"The league will bring relevance and context to ODI cricket over the next three years, as qualification for the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2023 is at stake," Geoff Allardice, ICC general manager for cricket operations, said.

"The Super League gives cricket fans around the world even more reasons to watch as the drama of league cricket unfolds.

"The decision last week to move the World Cup back to late 2023 gives us more time to schedule any games lost due to COVID-19 and preserve the integrity of the qualification process, meaning it will be decided on the field of play, which is important."

Reigning world champions England will kick things off this week when they start their series against Ireland, the first of three matches between the teams taking place at the Rose Bowl on Thursday.

"We're looking forward to playing cricket again and to the ICC Men's World Cup Super League," England white-ball captain Eoin Morgan said.

"Given the situation, it will be quite different to the last time we played at home, when we lifted the World Cup at Lord's, but it's nice to be starting our journey for the next edition of the tournament. 

"I'm sure cricket fans all over the world will be excited to see white-ball cricket resume and we're looking forward to the challenge."

West Indies coach Phil Simmons has insisted he has no regrets regarding the line-up fielded for the final Test match, against England, disagreeing sharply with views that suggested refreshing the bowling line-up.

The West Indies bowlers have increasingly found wickets hard to come by the longer the Test series has gone on.  In the first Test, which the Caribbean team won by four wickets, the West Indies dismissed England for 204 and 313.  In the second Test, the team conceded 469 for 9 declared and 129 for 3 declared in the second innings, Stokes, in particular, took liberties with the bowling attack, smashing 176 in the first innings and then 78 in the second.

So far in the third and final Test, England has made 369 and then gone on to make 226 for 2 declared in the second innings.  In his first match back from injury, fast bowler Shannon Gabriel has looked a little less than his best, since the first Test, where he claimed 4 for 62 and 5 for 75.  Simmons insisted, however, that the players were all fully fit and the best available under the circumstances.

“Fitness is one of the first things we take into consideration and everyone on the park was fit,” Simmons told members of the media, following the end of the third day’s play.

“I think that it was one of the things we took into consideration.  The fast bowlers especially have done a lot of work but I didn’t see any of them faltering in this game.”

 

The magnificent Stuart Broad took his tally of Test wickets to 499 as England dominated West Indies on day three at Old Trafford to close in on a series victory.

Broad smashed a half-century before taking striking twice with the ball on day two and the paceman was the star of the show again in Manchester on Sunday. 

Jason Holder (46) and Shane Dowrich (37) ensured the tourists avoided the follow-on, but Broad (6-31) took four wickets in quick time before lunch to bowl them out for 197 - giving England a first-innings lead of 172 runs.

Rory Burns (90), Dom Sibley (56) and Joe Root (68 not out) piled on the runs before the declaration came at 226-2, setting the tourists - who lost Dowrich to a facial injury - a mammoth 399 to win.

Broad (2-8) then reduced the Windies to 10-2 at stumps and they look set to lose the Wisden Trophy unless the rain forecast to wipe out day four also rescues them on Tuesday.

Holder had a life when he was brilliantly caught by Ollie Pope after the Windies resumed on 137-6, but Chris Woakes over-stepped.

That did not prove to be costly, though, as Broad ended a 68-run stand in his first over of the day by trapping the captain bang in front and soon wrapped up the innings in a brilliant burst.

There was more pain for the Windies in the field after lunch, Holder struck on the thumb and wicketkeeper Dowrich took a blow to the face trying to gather a Shannon Gabriel short ball, Joshua Da Silva replacing him.

Da Silva missed a chance to stump Burns for 12 off Roston Chase and England's openers took the score on to 86-0 at tea, scoring more freely after a slow start.

Sibley raised the tempo after the break and was the first to 50 before he fell lbw to Holder to end an opening stand of 114, with Burns also raising his bat following a disdainful sweep for four off Rahkeem Cornwall.

Burns should have gone leg before to Cornwall on 75 and looked destined for a century before Chase sent him on his way, prompting Root to declare after making a swashbuckling half-century.

Broad returned to centre stage in the final 20 minutes of a dream day for England, John Campbell nicking the man of the moment's third ball to Root in the slips and nightwatchman Kemar Roach edging behind.

 

Broad shoulders the responsibility

Broad stepped up with the bat when England needed him on Saturday, blasting 62 off just 45 balls before taking a couple of wickets.

The paceman removed Holder with his third ball on Sunday, then went on to add another three wickets in as many overs to end the Windies innings to claim an 18th five-wicket Test haul.

Broad said he was "angry, frustrated and gutted" to be left out of for the first Test and the 34-year-old has taken that fury out on the tourists in Manchester, with another two wickets late in the day putting him on the brink of a huge landmark.

 

Dowrich down in the mouth

Windies keeper Dowrich has struggled with the gloves this week and poor handling saw him take a painful blow after lunch.

He failed to take a short ball from Gabriel that swung after passing Burns and appeared to be struck at the side of his mouth.

Dowrich was unable to continue and the uncapped Da Silva, who will not be able to bat, padded up to take his place after a brief stint behind the stumps for Shai Hope.

 

Root cuts loose after openers make Windies toil

Root fell in the 20s twice on his return in the second Test, but he got in on the act as a tired West Indies attack suffered.

The captain clattered Cornwall over mid-off for six as he went into one-day mode, facing just 56 balls for his highly entertaining 68 not out and the only slight disappointment for England was that Burns failed to reach three figures.

West Indies wicketkeeper Shane Dowrich was replaced by Joshua Da Silva after taking a blow to the face on day three as England strengthened their grip on the decisive third Test.

Jason Holder (46) and Dowrich (47) ensured the Windies avoided the follow-on, but Stuart Broad (6-31) took all four wickets in the morning session to dismiss them for 197.

There was more pain for the tourists after England started their second innings with a lead of 162 at Old Trafford, Holder the first to be in pain after being struck on the thumb. 

The captain was able to continue, but Dowrich went off the field after a short delivery from Shannon Gabriel went through his gloves and appeared to hit him in the face.

Shai Hope initially took the gloves before the uncapped Da Silva, who will not be able to bat in the second innings, came on to take his place and soon missed a chance to stump Rory Burns.

England were 50 without loss in the afternoon session, leading by 222 runs as they bid to regain the Wisden Trophy, knowing rain is likely to wipe out day four.

West Indies captain, Jason Holder, has earned the ire of former fastbowler, Winston Benjamin, who has not liked the way he has treated paceman Alzarri Joseph.

According to Benjamin, Joseph has been underutilized by the skipper, making it difficult for him to develop a rhythm and perform at his best.

“It’s not because I’ve worked with this young man, but I think Alzarri has been handled poorly by the captain from day one, not just this series, and just look at how he is being used. Here it is that you have a youngster with raw talent and we don’t have a lot of bowlers with raw talent, but how do you get experience, isn’t it by doing what you have to do?” said Benjamin during an airing of the ‘Good Morning Jojo Sports Show’.

Benjamin also suggested Holder has an issue with Joseph and may not think he is as good as people are purporting.

“If you’re not happy with an individual and you think there is too much talk about this individual and don’t think he’s as good and you want to prove a point, then you give him short spells, bowl him with the old ball when things are tight and critical so he never has a break,” said Benjamin

Benjamin went on to point out that Holder has a responsibility that comes with being captain that, if not managed properly, could be harmful.

“The captain has the ability to make or break a bowler. The time that you give him the ball to bowl, the confidence that you place in him will determine the frame of mind and if you are going to give me two overs and take me off every minute, the first thing I am going to say is that you don’t have any confidence in me so my whole demeanour is now going to change,” said Benjamin.

Benjamin, the mentor of Joseph, was speaking after the first two Tests in the three-match #raisethebat Series currently ongoing in England.

In that first Test, Joseph bowled a total of 31 overs to end with match figures of 2-98, while in the second Test he bowled even less, accounting for 25.1 overs for a match-haul of 1-84. Joseph was dropped in favour of spinner Rahkeem Cornwall for the Third Test which heads into day three on Sunday.

According to Benjamin, there is a certain selfishness in the way Holder rotates his bowlers.

“Now, what I have observed with our captain is that he doesn’t bowl unless things are happening and once things are happening the ball belongs to him and he’s not relinquishing that but as soon as you hit a little rough patch, you go and work this ball for me and as soon as things start happening he comes back in and cleans up. I have seen those things, I’ve been part of those situations many times. I’ve gone through that myself,” he said.

What Joseph needs now, more than anything else, Benjamin went on to explain, is experience.

According to the former fast bowler, who took 61 wickets in 21 Tests for the West Indies, that experience can only be had if the captain allows it.

“You can’t learn experience; you learn skill, you develop skill, but experience is you participating in whatever it is in order to gain the experience.”

The West Indies and England are locked at a game apiece in their three-Test series with England dominating the third.

England, sent into bat scored 369 and after two days of cricket, have the West Indies in a spot of bother, six wickets down for 137.

 

West Indies pacer Kemar Roach is elated to join the ranks of bowlers from the region to have more than 200 wickets in Test cricket but wants more.

Roach earned his 200th scalp when he bowled Chris Woakes, ending day two of the final Test in the #raisethebat Series against England at Old Trafford with figures of 4-72 and in the process helping the West Indies bowl the hosts out for 369.

Roach was the best of the bowlers with his 25.4 overs going at 2.81. Shannon Gabriel ended with 5-77, Jason Holder, 1-83, and Roston Chase 2-36. Rahkeem Cornwall, in his English debut bowled 27 wicketless overs for 85 runs.

“It’s a great feeling. I’ve worked very hard to get to this stage,” said Roach.

Roach, who was at the peak of his powers in 2014, suffered a car accident a number of injuries on his way to recovery, leaving many to believe his career might have been over.

“I’ve been through a lot cricketing wise with my body and injury and stuff so, today it was very heartwarming to get to this significant milestone,” he said, thinking back to his ordeal.

With the worst of his injury woes behind him, Roach is now looking toward the future and seeing how far up the ladder of great West Indies fastbowlers he can climb.

Roach, with 201 wickets in his 59th Test, is ninth on the list of all-time highest wicket-takers from the West Indies. He is one wicket behind Andy Roberts and 34 behind Sir Garfield Sobers.

Ahead of those three are Courtney Walsh (519), Curtly Ambrose (405), Malcolm Marshall (376), Lance Gibbs (309), Joel Garner (259), and Michael Holding (249).

Roach is aware of all the names ahead of him and sees these milestones as important.

“I base my career on milestones actually, 100 wickets, 150 wickets, and obviously if you get to those stages it means you’re doing well so I push myself to the limit trying to get to as many milestones as I can in my career. That is a motivating factor for me,” he said.

“That is a motivating factor for me. This 200 was great for me to tick off but let’s see what 250 looks like, let’s see what 300 looks like.”

The West Indies reply to England’s 369 has not gone well, with the visitors struggling at 137-6. Holder, on 24, and Shane Dowrich on 10, are the not-out batsmen.

The West Indies and England are tied 1-1 in their three-Test series with the next three days set to decide who takes home the Wisden Trophy.

Stuart Broad said he wants to improve in the "frustrating" art of batting after carting West Indies bowlers all over Old Trafford on an excellent day for England.

Fast bowler Broad has been a batting enigma at international level, boasting a top score of 169 and now 13 half-centuries, but there have also been 35 ducks and abundant single-figure scores across his 205 innings.

His 62 on Saturday was bludgeoned from just 45 balls, allowing England to recover after collapsing from 262-4 to 280-8 in their first innings, the hosts eventually posting 369 all out.

West Indies were in trouble on 137-6 at stumps in response, with Broad and James Anderson both returning figures of 2-17, leading to talk of a possible follow-on.

Broad said England "had a great day", but he had an exceptional day.

"Batting is such a frustrating, weird thing," Broad told Sky Sports.

"If you'd told me this morning I'd get 10, I'd have been pretty happy to shake your hand and take it. You end up getting 60 and end up kicking the ground you've not got 70.

"It's the weirdest thing in the world. It's great to get 60, but I'm annoyed I hit a full toss straight down deep mid-wicket's throat now."

The 34-year-old revealed how former England head coach Peter Moores, now at Nottinghamshire, had provided several useful pointers towards Broad becoming a better batsman.

"He came to me in June and said about looking at how Shane Warne played, particularly in the 2005 Ashes when he scored some really useful runs," Broad said.

"It was quite unorthodox and opening up different parts of the field. I looked at that, did a bit research at how he went about it and decided that was quite a good way for me to go, to open up the off side as I look scoring through there. To try and keep my head out of falling over.

"It's really hard to tell in the nets – you need match practice at it – but I felt really comfortable today. The situation helped – it was not one of those to hang around for two hours and see where we went, it was one of those to try and take attack to the bowlers."

Broad succeeded where many colleagues failed on the second morning of the match, before a pace onslaught from England left West Indies in deep trouble.

Having the option to make the tourists follow on in the series decider would be a dream scenario for England, and West Indies will require 33 more runs to avoid that possible fate.

"That's definitely something we will be hunting for, especially with some weather around," Broad said.

"You don't want to read too much into the forecast, but if we got the chance to enforce the follow-on, it would be a serious consideration because we are desperate to win this series.

"If that gives us the best chance to do that, the bowlers will be fresh and ready to go."

Stuart Broad stepped into the all-rounder role as England took control of the third Test against West Indies.

Stuart Broad wrested the momentum of the deciding third test back in England’s favour Saturday by smashing a counterattacking 62 before the team was dismissed by the West Indies for 369 to bring up lunch on day two.

Resuming on 258-4, England lost a wicket in four consecutive overs to collapse to 280-8, with Ollie Pope falling first and failing to add to his overnight score of 91.

The collapse brought Broad to the middle and the left-hander hit the Windies’ bowlers to all parts of Old Trafford, reaching his half-century in 33 balls — putting him tied for third place in the all-time list of England’s fastest test fifties.

Broad’s 45-ball innings ended when he holed out in the deep off an ambitious swept volley, but by then he had frustrated the West Indies and put England back in charge of a series currently poised at 1-1.

His potentially game-changing ninth-wicket partnership with Dom Bess was worth 76 runs, with Broad hitting nine fours and a six.

Bess was left stranded on 18 after Anderson was the last man out for 11. England added 111 runs in the session.

Earlier, Pope was dropped at slip off Shannon Gabriel before the same paceman got one through the gate his very next over.

Chris Woakes (1) then slashed at a wide ball onto his stumps to give fast bowler Kemar Roach his 200th test wicket.

Jos Buttler, who resumed on 56, was out for 67 when he edged Gabriel to Jason Holder at second slip and the West Indies captain also pouched a catch to remove Jofra Archer (3) off the bowling of Roach.

Roach had team-best figures of 4-72.

The Windies, who won the first test in Southampton before losing the second match in Manchester, are looking to capture a test series in England for the first time since 1988.

While Rahkeem Cornwall went wicketless in his first outing of the #raisethebat Series at Old Trafford in Manchester on Friday, his vice-captain thinks the big off-break bowler had a good outing.

Cornwall ended the first day of the third Test, with the West Indies and England locked 1-1, with figures of 0-71 from 21 overs, while England were 258-4.

England’s batsmen, except for an lbw shout looked comfortable against Cornwall’s spin and when Ollie Pope, 91, and Jos Buttler, 56, started coming down the wicket, Cornwall struggled to keep them back in their crease.

Despite the struggles which saw Cornwall go at 3.38 runs per over, the most expensive of the West Indies bowlers, Brathwaite still believed it was a good outing.

“I thought Rahkeem was good. The pitch spun a bit and I thought he controlled the runs,” said Brathwaite.

Cornwall was involved in something spectacular though, a one-handed grab at slip that came from the slashing blade of Rory Burns, 57, off the bowling of Roston Chase.

Chase only bowled eight overs but had more luck than Cornwall, bagging 1-24.

But according to Brathwaite, there is enough there for Cornwall to be hopeful about.

“He didn’t go for too many runs, which was good. It was unfortunate that he didn’t get a wicket but I thought he was decent,” said the West Indies vice-captain.

The best of the West Indies bowlers was kemar Roach, who ended the day with 2-56, while Shannon Gabriel, 0-47, and Jason Holder, 0-45, were not as penetrative as in previous Tests.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.