MS Dhoni, who made his ODI debut in December 2004 against Bangladesh and was run out without scoring, now holds the record for the most wins by an Indian captain in ODIs and T20Is, and most back-to-back wins by an Indian captain in ODIs.

He took over the ODI captaincy from Rahul Dravid in 2007 and led the team to its first-ever bilateral ODI series wins in Sri Lanka and New Zealand. In June 2013, when India defeated England in the final of the Champions Trophy in England, Dhoni became the first captain to win all three ICC limited-overs trophies (World Cup, Champions Trophy and the World Twenty20).

As an individual, Dhoni thrived in the Indian lower order scoring 10 ODI centuries and 73 50s. His presence made India a formidable opponent against all rivals because as long as he was at the crease India was in with a chance of victory.

In the third match of India’s bilateral series against Sri Lanka in 2005 at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Jaipur, Sri Lanka had set India a target of 299 after a Kumar Sangakkara century and, in reply, India lost Tendulkar early.

Dhoni was promoted to number-three to accelerate the scoring and ended the game with an unbeaten 183 off 145 balls, winning the game for India.

Wisden Almanack (2006) described the knock as ‘Uninhibited, yet anything but crude'. It was the highest individual score in ODI cricket in the second innings before it was broken by Australia’s Shane Watson seven years later.

 

Career Statistics

 

Full name: Mahendra Singh Dhoni

Born: July 7, 1981, Ranchi, Bihar (now Jharkhand)

Major teams: India, Air India Blue, Asia XI, Bihar, Bradman XI, Chennai Super Kings, East Zone, East Zone Under-19s, Help for Heroes XI, India A, Indian Board President's XI, International XI, Jharkhand, Rajasthan Cricket Association President's XI, Rest of India, Rising Pune Supergiants, Sehwag XI

Playing role: Wicketkeeper-batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: India (2004-Present)

Mat  Inns  NO  Runs   HS     Ave      SR      100s      50s    Ct       St

350   297    84  10773  183*  50.57    87.56     10       73      321     123

 

Career Highlights

  • Highest batting average among wicket-keepers (50.96)
  • In 2017, became the first Indian to hit 200 sixes in ODIs
  • ICC ODI Player of the Year (2008 & 2009)
  • Highest score by a wicket-keeper, 183 against Sri Lanka in 2005
  • 1st player to pass 10,000 runs in ODIs with an average of over 50
  • Most not outs (82) in ODIs
  • Most stumpings (120) by any wicket-keeper in ODIs

Sri Lankan bowler Shehan Madushanka has been banned from all formats of cricket after he was arrested for alleged possession of illegal drugs.

Madushanka, who took a hat-trick in his only ODI against Bangladesh in 2018, was suspended by Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) and faces an inquiry.

An SLC statement said: "Sri Lanka Cricket decided to suspend Shehan Madushanka from all forms of cricket, with immediate effect.

"The decision was taken following the player was arrested by the police and later sent on remand custody for alleged possession of illegal drugs.

"The decision to suspend will remain intact until a full inquiry is conducted by the SLC into the matter."

Madushanka also played in two Twenty20 internationals two years ago before being troubled by injuries.

Mitchell Starc thinks the ICC's recommendation to ban polishing the ball with saliva due to health concerns amid the coronavirus pandemic could lead to boring cricket.

The ICC chief executives' committee will vote on the proposal, which has been put forward to "mitigate the risks posed by the COVID-19 virus", in June.

It has been reported the ICC will not permit the use of an artificial substance to generate movement when the ball is in the air, though players can use sweat.

Australia paceman Starc understands the concerns but thinks bowlers should be offered an alternative to ensure batsmen to not get an advantage.

"I understand that completely and hear what they're saying in terms of a foreign substance, but whether that can be controlled by the umpires in terms of they have a portion of the wax and you can only use a small amount, I don't know, but there needs to be a maintaining of the even contest," Starc said in a video conference.

"I understand what they're saying with foreign substances and that it's black and white in terms of that, but it's an unusual time for the world and if they're going to remove saliva shining for a portion of time they need to think of something else for that portion of time as well.

"Whether it be the wickets being not as flat or at least considering this shining wax to a degree, there needs to be some thought on that, I think.

"I guess you use both those things [saliva and sweat] to shine the ball. I've probably been a bit more on the sweat side, just trying to not get my hands in my mouth too much.

"But I agree completely with what Pat [Cummins] commented on last week: that contest with bat and ball, we don't want to lose that or get further away from that even contest, so there needs to be something in place to either keep that ball swinging.

"They've mentioned that it's only going to be there for a period of time and then once the world gets back to a relatively normal situation then saliva can come back into shining the ball.

"But if it's going to be a window of time there, maybe then instruct people to leave more grass on the wickets to have that contest or if they're going to take away a portion of maintaining the ball, there needs to be that even contest between bat and ball, otherwise people are going to stop watching, and kids aren't going to want to be bowlers.

"I think as we saw in Australia the last couple of years, there's some pretty flat wickets, and if that ball's going straight, it's a pretty boring contest.

"I think [ball manufacturers] Kookaburra have been developing a shining wax or something of the sort, so whether there's consideration of that, there needs to be some maintaining [of] that even contest.

"Generally, the spinners reckon that the wickets that seam a bit also spin, so maybe if you bring the bowlers back into the game, you'll tick all the boxes."

Desmond Haynes first made his name on the international scene with 148 at Antigua in a One-Day International against Australia.

Until recently, he held a number of ODI records, including most runs and most centuries.

The 148 against Australia remains the highest number of runs ever made by a batsman on debut in an ODI as well as the fastest century scored by an ODI debutant.

He played in the World Cup of 1979, won by the West Indies, and returned to the competition in 1983, 1987 and 1992.

In 25 World Cup matches, Haynes scored 854 runs at 37.13 with three fifties and one century.

Like most West Indian openers, Haynes was strong against pace and, after struggling against spin early in his career, developed into a strong player of slow bowling, exemplified by his knocks of 75 and 143 against Australia on an SCG dustbowl in 1989.

 

Career Statistics 

 

Name: Desmond Haynes

 

Born: February 15, 1956, Holders Hill, St James, Barbados

 

Major teams: West Indies, Scotland: Barbados, Middlesex, Western Province

 

Batting style: Right-hand bat

 

ODI Career: West Indies (1978-1994)

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100s        50s           

 

238          237        28           8648      152*      41.37     13707      63.09          17           57                         

 

Career Highlights

  • Scored the highest century ever by an ODI debutant (148)
  • He played 4 world cups for the West Indies between 1979 and 1992
  • He was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1991
  • Scored 8,648 runs at an average of 41.27

Relentless aggression, strong wrists and natural timing were the hallmarks of Tillakaratne Dilshan’s career.

The year 2009 was a watershed year in his career, and a huge factor was his move up the batting order to open the innings in all three forms of the game.

It was a move that proved his making, as he exploited attacking fields and amassed huge scores in all formats: he scored 11 international hundreds in the year.

He is the first cricketer in the history of the game to score hundreds in all formats as a captain.

He is the fourth Sri Lankan, and 11th player overall to score 10,000 ODI runs. Dilshan scored 1000 or more ODI runs in a calendar year four times and never failed to amass fewer than 800 runs in any calendar year between 2009 and 2015.

 

Career Statistics

Names: Tillakaratne Dilshan     

Born: October 14, 1976, Kalutara

Major teams: Sri Lanka, Asia XI, Basnahira South, Bloomfield Cricket and Athletic Club, Delhi Daredevils, Guyana Amazon Warriors, Kalutara Town Club, Karachi Kings, Northern Districts, Peshawar Zalmi, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club, Singha Sports Club, Surrey, Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm off-break

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

Career: Sri Lanka (1999-2016)         

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave     BF          SR        100s   50s   4s      6s     Ct       St

330     303      41     10290    161*  39.27   11933     86.23       22     47    1111   55     123      1

 

Career Highlights

  • 4th Sri Lankan, and 11th overall to score 10,000 ODI runs
  • Scored 1000 + ODI runs in a calendar year 4 times
  • Highest score for Sri Lanka without hitting a six (161*)
  • Most runs as an opener for Sri Lanka in a calendar year (1207)

Saeed Anwar almost never hit a ball in anger, though the 938 boundaries and 97 sixes he struck over the course of his 14-year career would suggest otherwise. But in Anwar, grace and timing were equal to great power. The batsman was capable of destroying most bowling attacks the world had to offer at the time and the margin of error was very small for anyone facing the Pakistani. Anwar’s 194 was once the highest ODI score ever achieved until Sachin Tendulkar put paid to the record. Anwar’s foot movements were the picture of efficiency, little shifts of weight giving him the leverage to punish anything slightly offline. His favourite shots meant cover fielders had a lot of work to do recovering balls from the boundary, but they could at least forget about cutting them off, so good was the placement Anwar showed throughout his career.

   

Career Statistics

Full name: Saeed Anwar

Born: September 6, 1968, Karachi, Sind

Major teams: Pakistan, Agriculture Development Bank of Pakistan, Karachi, Lahore, United Bank Limited

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1989-2003)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave      BF          SR        100s     50s    4s          6s     

247     244      19     8824      194    39.21   10938     80.67     20          43     938        97

 

Career Highlights

  • Pakistan's leading century-maker in ODIs (20)
  • Broke VIV Richards 13-y-o ODI record score in amassing 194
  • Most runs for Pakistan (12,113)
  • Wisden Cricketer of the year in 1997

Regarded as one of the greatest opening batsmen of all time, South Africa’s Hashim Amla currently holds the record for being the fastest ever to 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000, 6000 and 7000 ODI runs. He also became the fastest cricketer to reach 10 ODI centuries.

His ODI history is a repository of records.

Having made his debut against Bangladesh in March 2008, Hamla quickly established himself as a class above the rest and by 2014, he had become the fastest cricketer to reach 15 ODI centuries, doing so in 86 innings.

That year he also became the fastest cricketer to reach 16 centuries, achieving the feat in his 94th ODI inning and fastest cricketer to 17 centuries in ODIs in his 98th innings.

On January 18, 2015, he became the fastest cricketer to score 18 centuries in ODIs in his 102nd innings. He was also the fastest to 20 ODI centuries.

Amla has scored ODI centuries against all Test-playing countries and is only the fourth person to do so.

 

Career Statistics

Name: Hashim Amla    

Born: March 31, 1983, Durban, Natal

Major teams: South Africa, Barbados Tridents, Cape Cobras, Derbyshire, Dolphins, Essex, Khulna Tigers, Kings XI Punjab, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa XI, Trinbago Knight Riders, World-XI

Playing role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

 

ODI Career: (2008-2019)

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS     Ave        BF           SR           100s        50s           4s           6s              

181         178          14          8113      159    49.46     9178        88.39          27           39           822          53  

 

Career Highlights

  • Fastest to 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000, 6000 and 7000 ODI runs
  • Fastest to 25 ODI centuries
  • 1st South African to score 25 centuries in ODIs
  • 4th cricketer to score 25 centuries in both Test and ODI cricket

Sourav Ganguly made his ODI debut for India in a six-wicket loss to the West Indies. Batting at number six Ganguly scored only three runs as India succumbed to the West Indies bowling for 191 in 48.3 overs.

Moved up and down the order as the needs demanded, Ganguly had some measure of success early on with scores of 46 against England in May 1996 and 59 against Australia in September that year. However, after being moved up the order permanently to open the batting along with Sachin Tendulkar, the pair formed one of the most destructive opening partnerships in history.

He scored his maiden ODI century in 1997, 113 against Sri Lanka. Later in the year, he won four consecutive man-of-the-match awards, in the Sahara Cup against Pakistan. During the third final of the Independence Cup at Dhaka in January 1998, India successfully chased down 315 off 48 overs, and Ganguly won the Man of the Match award.

During the 1999 World Cup in England at Taunton, Ganguly scored 183 from 158 balls and hit 17 fours and seven sixes. It was the second-highest score in World Cup history and the highest by an Indian in the tournament.

His partnership of 318 with Rahul Dravid is the highest overall score in a World Cup and is the second-highest in all ODI cricket.

By the time he played his last ODI against Pakistan in November 2007, Ganguly had scored more than 11,000 ODI runs that included 22 centuries and 72 50s to become one of India’s greatest ODI batsmen.

 

Career Statistics

Name: Sourav Ganguly

Born: July 8, 1972, Calcutta (now Kolkata), Bengal

Major teams: India, Asia XI, Bengal, East Zone, Glamorgan, India Under-19s, Kolkata Knight Riders, Lancashire, Marylebone Cricket Club, Northamptonshire, Pune Warriors

Playing role: Batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Height: 5 ft 11 in

 

ODI Career: India (1992-2007)

Mat        Inns       NO         Runs      HS     Ave        BF           SR           100s        50s           4s           6s              

311         300        23          11363    183     41.02     15416      73.70          22          72             1122      190 

 

Career Highlights

  • 2nd fastest batsman to reach 9,000 ODI runs
  • 8th highest run-scorer in ODI history and 2nd among Indians
  • Only cricketer to win 4 consecutive man-of-the-match awards in ODIs
  • One of five to have 10,000 runs, 100 wickets & 100 catches in ODIs
  • 1st player to score 3 centuries in the history of ICC Champions Trophy
  • Highest score by an Indian batsman at the World Cup (183)

Rohit Sharma’s career started slowly. He was clearly a talented player but never found that consistency all great players possess. Over the last few years though, that part of his game has come on in leaps and bounds and India can count on him to contribute significantly to most of their totals. That consistency came when he moved to the opening position in 2012. Since then, ‘hitman’, has shown a particular penchant for scoring double hundreds. In fact, as an ODI opener, facing the first delivery, he averages 56, while as the man at the non-striker’s end when the first ball is bowled to India, he averages 64.84, both higher than his career average of 49.27. Sharma is for want of a less common phrase, easy on the eye, and uses timing and classic intent to get his runs, however, he has plenty of power too. Sharma has scored almost half the number of total double hundreds the ODI game has seen in its history, his 209, 264, and 208 not out, equivalent to three of the seven scored to date. The West Indies’ Chris Gayle, India’s Virender Sehwag and Sachin Tendulkar, along with New Zealand’s Martin Guptill, are the only other players to score ODI double hundreds, each of them doing so once.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Rohit Gurunath Sharma

Born: April 30, 1987, Bansod, Nagpur, Maharashtra

Major teams: India, Air India, Deccan Chargers, India A, India Blue, India Green, India Red, India Under-19s, Indian Board President's XI, Indian Oil Corporation XI, Mumbai, Mumbai Cricket Association President's XI, Mumbai Cricket Association XI, Mumbai Indians, Mumbai Under-19s, Rest of India, West Zone

Playing role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

 

ODI Career: India (2007-present)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave      BF          SR           100s      50s         4s        6s     

224      217    32      9115      264    49.27   10250     88.92           29       43           817      244

 

Career Highlights

  • World record holder for highest score in an ODI (264)
  • Only cricketer to score more than one ODI double hundred
  • ICC ODI player of the year 2019
  • Scored most runs in ICC World Cup 2019

When I told my friend I was dedicating this blog to footballers like him, right off the bat he knew what I meant. Fat footballers.

Generally, fat means sluggish, lazy, slow and unskilled. Well, he’s no stranger to hearing these stereotypes. And he’s no stranger to overcoming them either.

For about 11 years his weight overshadowed small wins like going to four finals, receiving two medals and playing for Ardenne Prep, Jamaica College, Greater Portmore, Naggo Head and Duhaney Park.

“There was this one time when I went to a match and the opposing coach explained to his players that the right side of the field is the weaker side because there is a big fat boy on there— and there’s no way that this big fat boy can contain any of the players.”

Sportsmen and women are seen as the best physical specimens because they perform feats many of us can only dream of. Being overweight pokes holes into that ideal with the reaction from fans and even those inside sports like coaches and managers being to misjudge a player’s value and ability.

“I played numerous positions— forward, midfielder, defender. I enjoyed the defending position most. I engaged in tackles and used my brain to contain quick and skilful players. We had to set up different walls to contain corner and free kicks. It was like guiding a ship!”

Despite possessing obvious ability, my friend’s body-shaming continued unabated. Body shaming is criticizing or drawing attention to someone’s shape, size or appearance.

Teammates, players’ parents— it came from all directions. The taunting was overbearing. “Some of the people who body-shamed me were parents, coaches, players, teammates and friends. When I was in prep school, a player’s parent expressed that she doesn’t understand why her son is sitting on the bench when there is a fat boy on the field. She wondered what I had over her son.”

“Another example is in high school, a coach was giving out letters for summer training. He said to me that he doesn’t allow fat players on his team and the only way I’d get a letter was if I did something about my weight.

“I asked him if he did anything about it (his weight). He explained that he has always been on the chubbier side. He’s naturally big and so is his family. He then started to tell me how diets and portion control never work for him.

“To put him out of his misery, I asked if there was an upside to the misconceptions others had of him. I’ve definitely changed some minds. It was the beginning of the football season when all my teammates were talking about who was going to be captain. My coach didn’t announce the captain until minutes before the match. While spectators waited outside the dressing room for us, my coach turned to me and gave me the captain’s armband and told me that I’ll be leading the team for the rest of the season.

“I didn’t put on my armband before walking out of the dressing room but I led my team out. Usually, the captain leads the team to the game. I could hear spectators asking if I was the captain or not. As I approached the field I asked my fellow teammate to put the armband around my left arm to show the spectators, the rest of the team and the opposing team who was the actual captain.

“The coach saw me play the year before and knew I was capable.”

I wanted our discussion to end on a happy note. Still, I asked him if body shaming affected him in any way. He said ‘no.’

I wasn’t convinced because he remembered the remarks to a ‘t’; as if they were freshly said. I figured they lingered.

I didn’t bother to tell him that part because I’d rather tell you guys this:

Please be kinder to players who look like my friend. In no way is body shaming okay.

Rahkeem Cornwall debuted for the West Indies on August 30, 2019, against India.

Cornwall does not look like the average cricketer, lean and powerful, light on his or her feet, yet, in just his second match, against Afghanistan in Lucknow, he was the region’s best bowler, grabbing 7-75 and 3-46.

He also showed in the CPL that he is a dangerous batsman when he gets going and can take a game away from a team with his batting and bowling. At the first-class level, Cornwall has already taken over 300 wickets in just 62 games.

From Jimbo’s example, maybe there’s something to be said about staying your judgements.

Please share your thoughts on Twitter (@SportsMax_Carib) or in the comments section on Facebook (@SportsMax). Don’t forget to use #IAmNotAFan. Until next time!

West Indies bowler Shannon Gabriel is hopeful of returning from injury in time to be selected for a planned Test tour of England.

The Windies and England are attempting to organise a three-match series - to be held behind closed doors - for July, with games pencilled in for July 8, July 16 and July 24, according to Johnny Grave, the Cricket West Indies (CWI) chief executive.

Grave also confirmed a 25-man squad, including 10 reserves, will travel to the United Kingdom in the week commencing June 8.

Gabriel has not featured in the longest format since September 2019, having struggled with an ankle injury which subsequently required surgery in November last year.

Now, the paceman is focusing on stepping up his rehabilitation with the aim of returning to the fold for the series.

"It's a good feeling always to represent West Indies. It's good to be back out on the park," he told i955FM.

"The plan is right now to try to make it to the tour to England - hopefully that comes off. I'm just trying my best to stay positive and I hope everything goes well.

"It has been a long journey since November when I did the surgery on my ankle. Everything is going well, it has been a long process in terms of getting back to running and bowling and stuff like that.

"I am trying my best to be as fit as possible so I'm really working hard in terms of my fitness and managing my weight, trying not to get too heavy to put too much strain on my ankle. So I know once I put in the hard work everything will be okay in the end. I just want to stay positive.

"There has been no high-intensity work, I'm just taking my body back into it easy, taking it one day at a time and not trying to push too hard but it's still long while before the first Test in England and by that time I'm sure I'll be fit and ready."

With cricket having been suspended since March due to the coronavirus pandemic, Gabriel does not expect it to be an easy transition for many players to return, especially with physical-distancing measures introduced by the ICC.

"It's going to take a lot. It's going to be mentally taxing on the brain but you have to stay positive. Keep your mind fresh," Gabriel said.

"I know they [England] are going to be coming at us all guns [blazing] at us, but I know the guys

"Plus plenty of the guys haven't been playing any cricket, so it is going to take us a while to get back there. On the positive side, you're still getting the opportunity to play cricket and represent your country so that in itself should be enough motivation."

In 1993 the West Indies went into the fifth and final Test of a series against Australia at Perth tied at 1-1 and a number of brilliant performances made the game a one-sided affair, giving the visitors a not-so-close 2-1 victory.

A decision on whether the West Indies will go ahead with their three-Test tour of England could be made by Thursday this week, CWI CEO Johnny Grave has said.

Dean Elgar would be open to taking the South Africa Test captaincy and believes his experience should stand him in good stead for the role.

Over three months after Faf du Plessis stepped down as skipper, there has been no confirmation of a successor.

Quinton de Kock took over as white-ball captain, but South Africa director of cricket Graeme Smith stated that he would not lead his country in the longest format.

Aiden Markram has expressed his desire to take charge of the Test side and his opening partner Elgar suggested he would not turn down the chance to replace Du Plessis.

Elgar, who turns 33 next month, said in an interview released by Cricket South Africa on Monday: "I have done the captaincy thing in the past and I have done it from school level and provincial level‚ and now in a few professional franchise teams‚ and I have extremely enjoyed it.

"If I was asked to do the captaincy‚ definitely I will think hard and long about it because it would mean a lot to me."

The left-hander, who has twice stepped up to captain the Test side, thinks both his leadership experience and playing alongside influential characters can only be a positive.

He added: "I think my learning has definitely been quite vast in that regard because of the personnel that I have had before me in the change room.

"It has definitely been an eye-opener for me‚ a great learning curve‚ which I am extremely grateful for.

"As a person you never stop growing really. There is still a lot of growth coming and hopefully what I have learned I can pass it on to the younger guys."

Real Madrid have two reasons to remember May 24 fondly, while cricketer Nasser Hussain is also unlikely to ever forget the date.

Madrid have lifted the Champions League trophy twice on this day in sporting history, beating familiar opponents on both occasions.

As for Hussain, the former England batsman bowed out with a final innings that was perfectly scripted (well, except for his involvement in an untimely run out).

Take a look back at the major moments to occur through the years.

 

2000 - Madrid prevail in all-Spain final 

Madrid and Valencia made Champions League history in Paris, as two clubs from the same country met in the final of Europe's premier club competition for the first time.

Valencia had reached the showpiece at the expense of Barcelona, including thrashing their LaLiga rivals 4-1 in the first leg of the semi-final on their way to a 5-3 aggregate triumph (the same scoreline by which they had knocked out Lazio in the previous round).

However, Vicente del Bosque's Madrid ran out comfortable winners on French soil, Fernando Morientes, Steve McManaman and Raul with the goals in a resounding 3-0 triumph.

2000 - Pistons legend Thomas rewarded 

A two-time NBA champion and 12-time All-Star, Isiah Thomas was honoured for his achievements with a place in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

The point guard was selected by the Detroit Pistons with the second pick in the 1981 draft and went on to spend his entire playing career with the franchise, who retired his No.11 jersey.

Thomas played in 979 regular season games and was the focal point of the Detroit teams that won titles in 1989 and 1990, while the Pistons also had a heated rivalry with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls in the early 1990s.

Bob McAdoo, a two-time champion himself who was a prolific scorer in a 21-year playing career, was also voted in alongside Thomas.

2004 - Hussain signs out in style

In what would prove to be his final innings, Hussain scored an unbeaten hundred to help England beat New Zealand at Lord's.

The Black Caps had left the hosts needing a tough target of 282 in the final innings of the series opener - and they had England wobbling early at 35-2 following the dismissals of Marcus Trescothick and Mark Butcher.

Debutant Andrew Strauss combined with Hussain to put on a century stand before the former was run out following a mix-up with his senior batting partner, denying the left-hander - playing on his home ground - the possibility of scoring a century in both innings, as he departed for 83.

Hussain, however, made amends for his role in Strauss' dismissal by going on to reach three figures in a seven-wicket triumph. Three days later, he announced his retirement, swiftly moving from the field of play to the commentary box to start a career in the media.

2014 - Madrid derby sees Real clinch 'La Decima'

A 10th European title finally arrived for Madrid, though not without a dramatic late intervention from Sergio Ramos. Having not won the Champions League since 2002, they appeared set to fall at the final hurdle when they trailed city rivals Atletico 1-0 going into added time in Lisbon.

Diego Godin's first-half header had the newly crowned LaLiga champions on the brink of glory, but Ramos popped up to meet a Luka Modric corner and nod in a last-gasp equaliser.

Carlo Ancelotti's side went on to dominate in extra time, goals from Gareth Bale, Marcelo and Cristiano Ronaldo, who scored from the penalty spot, sealing a 4-1 triumph.

To rub salt in the wounds for Atletico, boss Diego Simeone was sent off before the final whistle having ran onto the pitch to confront Raphael Varane following an incident in the aftermath to Ronaldo's goal.

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