West Indies fast bowling legend Courtney Walsh has been appointed as interim assistant coach for the Windies Women’s team.

Walsh, the region’s all-time Test wicket-taker, will join Gus Logie who was recently announced as interim head coach.  The duo will be joined by former Guyana seamer Rayon Griffith.  The coaching triumvirate will replace the unit led by Henderson Springer.  

The 57-year-old former speedster recently served as bowling coach for the Bangladesh team.  Although his new appointment is expected to come with more sweeping responsibilities than his previous post, Walsh has revealed that his primary duties will involve working with the bowlers.

"My function is to focus a lot more on the bowlers and the cricket, in general, to get the ladies together," Walsh said.

"I’m just happy to be able to work with Gus - we haven’t had a chance to be on the same team since we were players and we just want the women to play the type of cricket we know they can play."

The team takes charge as the Windies Women prepare to host India Women in a three-match One Day International series.  Logie believes the program is already off to a positive start.

"We’ve had some of the best minds and coaches in the region working with the players," he said.

"Courtney and Rayon have been working really hard with the ladies at training and we are hoping to see the results on the field."

 

Bangladesh fast bowling coach Courtney Walsh expects his team to come back strongly as they take on West Indies in their fifth game of the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2019 in Taunton on Monday. 

West Indies fast bowling legend and Bangladesh bowling coach Courtney Walsh has warned the team’s seamers to be wary of difficult conditions in England.

The Asian country will be one of 10 teams that take the field when the tournament gets under way on May 30.  Unlike drier conditions on the subcontinent, a cloudier atmosphere with more moisture in the air can cause the cricket ball to swing.

The bowling great believes doing well in different conditions will come down to discipline and use of intelligence.

  “It will be a big challenge,” Walsh said.

“There are going to be some good cricket pitches, which are batting-friendly. We have to be intelligent and try to execute well. We have to read the conditions and the surfaces we play. Some places the ball might swing more than the others. We have to assess when we get there,” he added.

Bangladesh will bowl off the tournament against South Africa on June 2nd at the Oval in London.

“Most of the pitches will be docile and flat. We have to work on our variations and execution,” he said. “Everybody studies one another these days. So they know our strengths and weaknesses. Likewise, we also know theirs.”

 

 

Bangladesh bowling coach, former West Indies pacer, wants one of his charges handled with care ahead of the International Cricket Council’s Cricket World Cup in England just weeks away. 

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