England all-rounder Ben Stokes has been nominated for the New Zealander of the Year award, less than a week after dashing the Black Caps' Cricket World Cup dreams.

Stokes was instrumental in England's thrilling triumph at Lord's on Sunday, scoring an unbeaten 84 to force a Super Over and then making eight off three balls in the additional six deliveries as Eoin Morgan's side won an all-time classic on boundary count.

In an incident-packed innings, Stokes was caught by Trent Boult in the deep during the penultimate over only for the fielder to step on the rope with the ball in hand, and in the final over England's number five dived and accidentally diverted Martin Guptill's throw to the boundary with his bat, resulting in another crucial six runs.

However, despite playing a pivotal role in beating the Black Caps, Stokes, who was born in Christchurch and moved to England at the age of 12, has still received votes for the New Zealander of the Year award.

"We also received nominations for England's hero Ben Stokes," chief judge Cameron Bennett said in quotes published on the New Zealand Herald's website.

"He might not have been playing for the Black Caps but, having been born in Christchurch, where his parents now live, and with Maori ancestry, there's clearly a few Kiwis about who think we can still claim him."

Black Caps captain Kane Williamson - voted player of the tournament at the World Cup - is also up for the award, along with Abdul Aziz, who chased away a gunman after 51 people were killed in a terror attack on two Christchurch mosques.

Jason Roy is set to make his Test debut for England against Ireland, putting him in line for an Ashes call-up next month.

Star batsman Roy is yet to feature in the longest format at international level but was vital to hosts England's Cricket World Cup triumph.

His form in that tournament has earned him a first shot at Test cricket, selected among 13 players to face Ireland in a four-day contest at Lord's with Olly Stone and Lewis Gregory the other uncapped men to earn a spot.

The trio are also included in a 16-man group for a pre-Ashes camp.

There is good news for England, too, with James Anderson's inclusion in the squad, the experienced bowler having recovered from a calf tear.

However, Jofra Archer, another waiting for a Test bow, and Mark Wood are both suffering with side strains.

Wood is set for four to six weeks out while Archer will have a period of rest and return from Barbados later this month, with national selector Ed Smith stating the latter will be out "for a while".

Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler - stars of the World Cup success - have also been granted leave until the pre-Ashes camp ahead of the August 1 opener.

The four-day clash with Ireland begins on July 24.

 

England squad in full for Ireland Test: Joe Root, Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes.

England squad in full for pre-Ashes camp: Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach, Joe Root, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

England director of cricket Ashley Giles is uninterested in claims they were erroneously given an extra run in their incredible World Cup final win over New Zealand.

The tournament hosts lifted the trophy for the first time courtesy of having struck more boundaries than the Black Caps after the scores were tied at the end of 50 overs and then a Super Over.

However, arguably the pivotal moment in a bewitching contest came with the fourth ball of England's final over as, after hitting a full toss to deep midwicket, Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected Martin Guptill's throw to the fence as he ran back for two.

England were awarded six runs to take them within three of victory, falling one short but eventually prevailing on boundaries after both teams scored 15 in the Super Over.

But MCC rule 19:8 states that additional runs to a boundary from an overthrow or wilful act of fielder can only be awarded if the two batsmen have crossed at the time of the throw.

Stokes and Adil Rashid had not crossed when Guptill released the ball, and five-time ICC umpire of the year Simon Taufel said England should have only been awarded five runs, describing the six as a "clear mistake" and an "error of judgment", though he conceded the difficulty of officiating such a freak turn of events in the heat of the moment.

That is of no concern to Giles, who when asked whether the extra run mattered to him replied: "Not really.

"You could argue the last ball that [Trent] Boult bowled was a full toss on leg stump and if Stokes' hadn't just been looking for two he probably would've banged it out of the ground anyway.

"We are world champions; we have got the trophy and we intend to keep it."

There was chaos at Lord's on Sunday as England won the Cricket World Cup, beating New Zealand in the final in scarcely believable fashion.

An incredible clash went all the way to a Super Over and a boundary count to decide the winner after the scores were tied, with Ben Stokes' heroic effort to get England back into the match absolutely vital.

Plenty has been said and written about Stokes, his bizarre accidental six and the Super Over, but a lot of the finer details of the match were lost amid the noise.

We take a look at five key factors in England's win that might have been missed.

 

MIXED REVIEWS FROM NEW ZEALAND OPENERS

It did not take long for this absorbing contest to spark intrigue as the New Zealand openers had contrasting fortunes with reviews. Henry Nicholls' decision to go upstairs was a good one as replays showed Chris Woakes' delivery, initially ruled lbw, was going over the top and the batsman went on to make 55. Martin Guptill's call when he was dismissed was less impressive.

Woakes beat him on the inside edge and Guptill unwisely asked to take another look, throwing away a review. There was then no option open to Ross Taylor, who would have escaped after being pinned by Mark Wood.

WILLIAMSON'S FAILURE MORE COSTLY THAN ROOT'S

Both Kane Williamson and Joe Root enjoyed outstanding World Cups and were fully deserving of their places in the official team of the tournament. But neither man truly fired at Lord's on Sunday, with Williamson gone for 30 from 53 balls and Root even more sluggish with seven off 30.

Tom Latham still performed admirably after the New Zealand captain went, reaching 47, yet they went 92 balls without a boundary at one stage and failed to truly kick on. Williamson ended the tournament with 50 fours but was badly missed in those middle overs - especially considering boundary count became the final tie-breaker.

SANTNER DUCKS FINAL BALL TO SET 242

This really was a match of fine margins, with both teams scoring the same number of runs in their regular innings and then again in the Super Over. Every tiny error could be perceived as costly and there was a bizarre moment as Mitchell Santner inexplicably limited New Zealand's scoring at 241-8.

Jofra Archer sent in a slower-ball bouncer to end the Black Caps innings and Santner, with nothing to lose, ducked out of the way. That decision eased England's chase by a tiny but decisive margin.

DE GRANDHOMME DESPERATELY UNFORTUNATE

He might not have been an obvious hero, but had New Zealand held on in the fast and furious finale, Colin de Grandhomme could have been considered the match-winner. England's target of 242 was relatively modest but they were strangled by De Grandhomme, who took 1-25, having dropped Jonny Bairstow in his first over.

His was the most economical 10-over spell in a World Cup final since 1992 when Derek Pringle claimed 3-22. Like Pringle, though, his efforts were ultimately in vain.

BLACK CAPS' SPORTSMANSHIP EVIDENT AGAIN

Three sixes off the final two overs of England's innings did the damage for New Zealand. But while much has been made of the ludicrous nature of the third, as Ben Stokes accidently nudged a throw to the boundary, Guptill deserves credit for his honesty following the maximum that kickstarted England's surge.

Stokes looked to have been denied at the fence by Trent Boult, but the left-armer stepped on the boundary before unloading for Guptill to take the catch. In a fine show of sportsmanship, for which New Zealand were lauded throughout the tournament, Guptill immediately signalled for six.

England should have been awarded five runs, not six, when Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected a throw to the boundary in Sunday's epic Cricket World Cup final.

An apologetic Stokes earned six runs when he accidently nudged the ball for four as he lunged to complete a second run in the final over of England's innings, helping the hosts to tie the match with New Zealand and reach a Super Over.

England subsequently won due to their superior boundary count, but Simon Taufel says the Lord's umpires made "a clear mistake".

The MCC laws state additional runs to the boundary can only be awarded if the two batsmen have crossed at the time of the throw.

Stokes and team-mate Adil Rashid had completed one run but had not crossed a second time when Martin Guptill launched the ball back towards the wicket, meaning five runs should have been given.

Rashid would also have been on strike rather than star man Stokes.

Five-time ICC Umpire of the Year Taufel, part of the MCC laws sub-committee, acknowledged the error but had sympathy for on-field officials Kumar Dharmasena and Marais Erasmus.

"[England] should have been awarded five runs, not six," Taufel told FOX Sports. "It's a clear mistake - it's an error of judgment.

"In the heat of what was going on, they thought there was a good chance the batsmen had crossed at the instant of the throw. Obviously TV replays showed otherwise.

"The difficulty you have here is you've got to watch batsmen completing runs, then change focus and watch for the ball being picked up, and watch for the release [of the throw].

"You also have to watch where the batsmen are at that exact moment.

"[But] it's unfair on England, New Zealand and the umpires involved to say it decided the outcome."

The dust is still settling on a truly remarkable Cricket World Cup final at Lord's, where England edged New Zealand in enthralling fashion.

The hosts could only muster the same amount of runs as the Black Caps and actually produced fewer wickets, yet Eoin Morgan's men still scraped home on the boundary countback after a dramatic Super Over.

Statistics counted in England's favour on Sunday and they predictably led the way in a number of metrics as we look back on the tournament as a whole.

Using Opta data, we highlight the most outstanding figures from an incredible few weeks.

 

6 - Victory at Lord's on Sunday saw England claim their first World Cup title, becoming the sixth different team to win the competition.

12 - Meanwhile, New Zealand, beaten in such agonising fashion, are the team to have appeared at the most tournaments without getting their hands on the trophy.

22 - Ben Stokes saw a couple of bizarre sixes fall his way in the final, but team-mate and captain Morgan hit the most maximums at the 2019 finals.

4 - Four players this year passed the 1000-run mark for their World Cup careers. Virat Kohli (1,030), Shakib al Hasan (1,146) and the retiring Chris Gayle (1,186) were joined by Ross Taylor (1,002) on Sunday.

4.15 - Of the 48 players to bowl at least 40 overs, Colin de Grandhomme boasted the best economy rate. It was an outstanding 2.50 in the final.

648 - Rohit Sharma recorded the most runs at the 2019 tournament - the third most at a single World Cup - while no player in history can match his five centuries at a single edition.

27 - Mitchell Starc was also a record-breaker, with his wicket tally never bettered at a World Cup. After tying Trent Boult in 2015, he was on top of the pile again.

371 - Jofra Archer's inability to slow New Zealand in the Super Over almost cost England, but he contributed more dot balls than another bowler at the tournament. Boult, his Super Over rival, was second (351).

0 - His work with the bat in the final - intentional and otherwise - made Stokes the hero, yet he was also the only man to bowl at least 30 overs at the World Cup and not be hit for a six.

13 - England had a whole host of heroes throughout the tournament and Test captain Joe Root made more catches as a non-wicketkeeper than any player in the history of the World Cup.

21 - Including the men in the gloves, Tom Latham got 21 fielding dismissals - matching Adam Gilchrist's 2003 record.

Jofra Archer has revealed the encouragement he was offered by Ben Stokes before Sunday's dramatic Cricket World Cup final Super Over.

Stokes' heroic effort with the bat - making an unbeaten 84 - saw England dramatically take New Zealand to an additional six balls, where the Durham all-rounder starred again to set the Black Caps a target of 16 to win.

With more experienced options snubbed, England then turned to new boy Archer to deliver the over that would make or break their entire tournament.

But Archer was not alone in the moments leading up to a potentially career-defining spell, with Stokes at his side to give advice.

Stokes had seen the World Twenty20 final slip away from England in 2016 as he conceded four consecutive sixes to West Indies' Carlos Brathwaite, making him well-placed to speak to Archer.

The Barbados-born star later disclosed those crucial words of advice as he recovered from a first-ball wide to limit New Zealand to an agonising 15.

"Stokesy came over and told me, win or lose, today will not define me as a player," Archer said. "He told me everyone believes in me and Rooty [Joe Root] also came over and gave me some inspirational words.

"Stokesy told me that, even if we lost, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but in saying that I'm really pleased we won.

"He probably went through the same feeling when he bowled the last over [in 2016] and that is why he came over to me.

"He just told me that there would be a World T20 next year and we'd have more chances to win in the future, so it helped."

Stokes discussed the decision to hand Archer the ball in good humour, saying: "I definitely wasn't going to bowl it after last time.

"Jofra Archer, I backed him all the way, the talent he's got is incredible and he's showed up on the world stage and shown how good he is."

Eoin Morgan hailed Ben Stokes as "superhuman" after he inspired England to Cricket World Cup glory in an astonishing final against New Zealand at Lord's.

Stokes rescued the hosts with a mature innings of 84 not out, putting on 110 for the fifth wicket with Jos Buttler (59), as England reached 241 all out to force a Super Over after the Black Caps had posted 241-8.

All-rounder Stokes then struck eight of England's 15 runs in the Super Over and was rewarded when New Zealand matched England's tally, but were beaten having scored fewer boundaries.

England were crowned champions in the most dramatic fashion, Martin Guptill run out by a combination of Jason Roy and Buttler when going for a second run off the last ball of Jofra Archer's extra over.

Stokes was left shell-shocked after Carlos Brathwaite took him apart in the last over to win the 2016 World Twenty20 title in India, while just 11 months ago he was cleared of affray following an incident in Bristol.

The New Zealand-born 28-year-old was the hero on Sunday, and skipper Morgan saluted the former vice-captain, who scored over 400 runs in a glorious tournament.

Morgan said: "To come through it is extraordinary. He's almost superhuman. He has really carried the team and our batting line-up.

"I know Jos and his partnership was extraordinary, but to bat with the lower order the way he did I thought was incredible.

"The atmosphere, the emotion that was going through the whole game, he managed to deal with that in an extremely experienced manner. And obviously everybody watching at home will hopefully try and be the next Ben Stokes."

Morgan added: "I have said this a number of times about Ben, I think a lot of careers would have been ended after what happened in Kolkata. Ben on numerous occasions has stood up individually and in a unit for us.

"He leads the way in training, in any team meetings we have, and he's an incredible cricketer. And today he's had a huge day out and obviously we are thankful for that."

A furious Ben Stokes kicked his bat up in the air before whipping off his helmet and rocking his head back with his eyes shut as he trudged back to the famous Lord's pavilion.

The England all-rounder was in a complete state of disbelief at what had just happened and so was everyone else fortunate enough to witness the greatest Cricket World Cup final of all time.

Stokes had made a magnificent, mature 84 not out but was left crestfallen when Mark Wood was run out going for a second run to win it off the last ball.

That kept New Zealand's hopes of being crowned world champions for the first time alive under blue London skies on a glorious Sunday evening.

The brilliant Stokes was consoled by Wood as headed back towards the Long Room at the home of cricket, but the New Zealand-born former England vice-captain would have another shot at redemption.

Stokes and Jos Buttler (59) had rescued the hosts - who were 86-4 on a slow track chasing a seemingly modest 242 to end their long wait for a maiden World Cup triumph - as their fifth-wicket stand of 110 made it very much game on with the tension palpable.

That only increased when England needed 15 off what anxious fans, perched on the edge of their seats throughout an absorbing contest, presumed was the last over.

Stokes launched Trent Boult over the ropes and had six more from the next delivery when Martin Guptill's bullet throw from the deep struck his bat and ran away to the fence when he lunged desperately to get home coming back for a second.

Just three needed to win off two balls, surely England had one hand on the trophy? The buzz around the ground grew louder than ever, but Adil Rashid and Wood were run out as New Zealand's astonishing fielding ensured the scores were tied, with Boult breathing a sigh of relief having stepped on the rope attempting to catch Stokes in the penultimate over.

Bewildered spectators from various parts of the world were off their seats wondering what happens next as a shell-shocked, exhausted Stokes - who passed 400 runs for the tournament - went down on his haunches like a weary boxer who had just come through 12 rounds.

A Super Over was the answer, so Stokes kept his pads on and pulled himself off the ropes for another chance to be England's hero.

The 28-year-old duly struck eight of the 15 runs he and Buttler took off Boult as they played with freedom after knuckling down with great application earlier in the day.

Then it was the turn of Jofra Archer, who was charged with the task of racing in for England, the hopes of a nation he only qualified to play for a matter of months ago on his shoulders.

The Barbados-born quick started with a wide, then had his head bowed after Jimmy Neesham dispatched him into the crowd with a huge blow.

Five runs from three balls for Kane Williamson's men to make history. Just as it seemed there could surely not be another twist, it came down to two required off the last delivery.

Kiwis sat with their head in their hands as Archer steamed in and bowled to Guptill, who clipped the paceman to Jason Roy on the midwicket boundary and darted to the non-striker's end.

Roy whipped in the throw as Guptill frantically ran back for a second, yet with the World Cup within the opener's grasp, Buttler whipped off the bails and one of the great sporting venues erupted.

While there were puzzled looks from cricket-lovers who had travelled from various parts of the globe, the England players sprinted off into the outfield in front of the grand old pavilion knowing they had conquered the world.

Victory by virtue of having struck more boundaries than the Black Caps, who suffered the most painful loss four years after being thumped by Australia in the final.

New Zealand fans had been up in anticipation of celebrating their finest hour, but instead sat in a state of shock as Stokes clutched a bottle of champagne after picking up the man of the match award.

Stokes had been left out of the squad for the previous World Cup and suffered the anguish of being taken apart by West Indies all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite in the last over of the 2016 World Twenty20 final, costing England glory.

Eleven months after he was cleared of affray following a brawl in Bristol, Christchurch-born Stokes was a national hero, having shattered the dreams of his country of birth.

As 'Heroes' was played over the sound system with England fans dancing and singing, it was mission accomplished for Eoin Morgan's men.

In 2015 they returned home from the tournament in Australia and New Zealand in shame after failing to make it out of the group stage, but now they were on top of the world on home soil.

Trevor Bayliss, Andrew Strauss and Morgan played huge parts in totally transforming England from ODI failures to the best in the world, but nobody could have scripted the manner in which they attained glory, in the most dramatic of fashions.

The closing stages of England's remarkable Cricket World Cup final victory over New Zealand provided drama by the bucketload, with the hosts eventually prevailing following a Super Over at Lord's.

After New Zealand had posted 241-8, the final overs of England's chase could hardly have been more thrilling, and it turned out that was just the start.

We look back on how the drama unfolded as an astonishing final was won by the narrowest of margins, England prevailing due to the fact they scored more boundaries than the Black Caps.

 

STOKES SURVIVES MAJOR SCARE

Ben Stokes underpinned England's pursuit of 242, but the hosts were in big trouble after Jos Buttler's dismissal for 59 ended a fifth-wicket stand of 110.

When Liam Plunkett holed out to long-off in the 49th over, England needed 22 runs off nine deliveries.

Stokes then picked out Trent Boult on the long-on boundary from Jimmy Neesham's next ball, but the fielder could not avoid stepping over the rope while he still had the ball in his hands, meaning a crucial six runs were added to the home total.

 

IF YOU THOUGHT THAT SIX WAS UNUSUAL

A target of 15 from the final over became much tougher when Stokes failed to score from successive Boult deliveries.

England's key man thumped a maximum over midwicket to keep the chase alive, but no one could have possibly imagined what was to happen next.

As he came back for a tight second run to midwicket, Stokes dived and inadvertently deflected the ball - thrown in by Martin Guptill - to the boundary. The end result was one of the most unusual sixes you are ever likely to see and suddenly England needed just three from two deliveries.

 

NO WINNER AFTER 100 OVERS

To his credit, Boult responded superbly, and a fine yorker limited Stokes to a single from the penultimate delivery, with Adil Rashid run out at the non-striker's end as he chased a second that was never there to keep his partner on strike.

Stokes then played the final ball somewhat cautiously and could again only manage one, with Mark Wood also run out to ensure a Super Over was needed to split the teams.

 

YET MORE MOMENTUM SWINGS IN ONE-OVER SHOOTOUT

After such a gripping contest, it was no surprise to see even more twists and turns in the eliminator.

Stokes and Buttler were chosen to lead the England charge and both batsmen hit boundaries off Trent Boult to help Eoin Morgan's men to a healthy total of 15.

That score looked set to be surpassed when Jofra Archer started with a wide and was then taken for 12 in four balls - including a monstrous six over midwicket - by Neesham.

Yet the next delivery brought only a single, putting Martin Guptill on strike for the deciding ball with New Zealand needing two.

 

ARCHER AND ROY COMBINE TO SEAL GLORY

In arguably the most dramatic scenes Lord's has ever played host to, Guptill swiped Archer's final ball towards the deep midwicket boundary, where Jason Roy was lurking.

Roy had been guilty of a fumble earlier in the over, but on this occasion, he was not found wanting.

An accurate throw from the deep enabled wicketkeeper Buttler to break the stumps with Guptill well short of his ground and England duly celebrated an incredible victory by virtue of their superior boundary count, with the scores tied once again.

 

Joe Root felt it was "written in the stars" for Ben Stokes to be England's Cricket World Cup saviour as the hosts edged an epic final against New Zealand by virtue of a superior boundary count.

Stokes' excellent 84 not out saw England equal the Black Caps' 241 at Lord's on Sunday, while there was still no separating the sides after the match went to a Super Over.

Alongside Jos Buttler, Stokes managed 15 for his team from the additional six balls and when Martin Guptill was run out coming back for a second off the final delivery of New Zealand's over, the home side triumphed having struck more fours and sixes.

It was redemption for man-of-the-match Stokes, who was smashed for four successive maximums by West Indies' Carlos Brathwaite in the last over of the World Twenty20 final three years ago.

"Unbelievable. Wow. Hard to sum it up. What a day, what a tournament," Root said.

"Everyone has done what's been asked of them, we've come through difficult periods, held it together and performed under pressure.

"It was written in the stars for Ben, he's been through such a tough time, I'm so happy for him, I couldn't be more proud and pleased for him in particular."

England captain Eoin Morgan, meanwhile, was thrilled to see four years of planning come to fruition after his side were dumped out in the group stage in 2015 – an elimination that prompted a complete overhaul of the team's white-ball philosophy.

"There wasn't a lot in that game - commiserations to Kane [Williamson] and his team, the way they play their cricket is really worth aspiring to and the example they lead is hugely commendable," Morgan said.

"It's been a four-year journey, we've developed a lot particularly in the last two years, we find it hard on wickets like that, like all good teams do. Sport's tough at times but to get over the line today means the world.

"I was being cooled down by Liam Plunkett, which isn't a good sign.

"The guys in the middle kept us cool, they're very experienced, the best in the world, it's calming at times, there's not a lot between the teams, so we're delighted to lift the trophy today."

Ben Stokes said he doubts "there will ever be a better game in cricket history" than the remarkable contest that saw England pip New Zealand to Cricket World Cup glory.

An extraordinary final at Lord's was eventually decided following a Super Over, with the tournament hosts sealing victory courtesy of their higher boundary count in regulation play.

Eoin Morgan's side initially matched the Black Caps' total of 241 in 50 overs as Stokes contributed an invaluable 84 not out, before both sides scored 15 runs in the subsequent one-over shoot-out, Martin Guptill’s run out handing England victory.

"I'm lost for words to be honest, all the hard work to get us where we are today, this is what we aspire to be and we managed to come here and do it," said Stokes, who also batted alongside Jos Buttler in the Super Over before Jofra Archer just about saw England home with the ball.

"I don't think there'll ever be a better game in cricket history than that."

England's triumph owed much to a remarkable piece of good fortune towards the end of their chase, which saw Stokes - who had smashed Trent Boult's previous delivery for a maximum - claim six more as he dived to complete a second run and inadvertently deflected the ball to the boundary.

"I apologised to Kane [Williamson, New Zealand's captain] countless times about that, it's not exactly how you want to do that," added Stokes. "I said to Kane I'll be apologising for that for the rest of my life.

"It's written in the stars when that kind of stuff happens."

Stokes was famously on the receiving end of late drama when England lost the 2016 World Twenty20 final to West Indies, the all-rounder taken for four successive sixes by Carlos Brathwaite in a last over that began with 19 needed for victory.

"I definitely wasn't going to bowl it [the Super Over] after last time," joked Stokes, who went on to hail Archer's nerve at the death.

"Jofra Archer, I backed him all the way, the talent he's got is incredible and he's showed up on the world stage and shown how good he is."

Ben Stokes and Jofra Archer were the heroes as England finally claimed their maiden Cricket World Cup title in the most remarkable fashion imaginable, defeating New Zealand courtesy of a higher boundary count following a Super Over at Lord's.

In truly extraordinary scenes, the two teams in Sunday's final could not be separated in 100 overs of regulation play - England posting 241 all out in reply to their opponents' 241-8 - and then managed 15 runs apiece in the one-over shootout that followed.

The final act saw Martin Guptill needing to hit two runs off Archer, the Barbados-born paceman who only qualified for England in March, but the Black Caps opener was run out coming back for a second from the final delivery, unable to beat Jason Roy's accurate throw from deep midwicket.

England, who hit 24 boundaries in their 50 overs compared to New Zealand's 16, were therefore able to celebrate a first final victory at the fourth attempt, with Stokes having played a key role in both their initial run chase and the Super Over to exorcise the demons of his last-over misery at the hands of Carlos Brathwaite in the 2016 World Twenty20 final showpiece against West Indies.

 

The 2019 Cricket World Cup final between New Zealand and England sensationally went down to a Super Over after a remarkable conclusion to the hosts' run-chase at Lord's.

Chasing 242 for victory, England required 15 from the final over and three off the last two balls after two sixes from Ben Stokes, the second courtesy of an extraordinary turn of events that saw the batsman dive to make a second run and inadvertently divert the ball over the rope for four more.

The drama was not over there, however, as Adil Rashid and Mark Wood were each run out at the non-striker's end to ensure Stokes (84 not out off 98 balls) could only pinch singles from each of Trent Boult's final deliveries.

That meant England finished on 241 all out, matching New Zealand's total of 241-8. As a result, a one-over shootout was required to decide which team would win their first World Cup final.

 

England all-rounder Ben Stokes looms as the match-winner in Sunday's Cricket World Cup final against New Zealand, according to former Australia spinner Brad Hogg.

Hogg helped Australia to World Cup glory in 2003 and 2007 and is expecting tournament hosts England to lift one-day international cricket's biggest prize for the first time.

Stokes has hit 381 runs at 54.42 during the World Cup and has also chipped in with seven wickets for an England side who booked their place in the Lord's decider with an eight-wicket thrashing of Australia on Thursday.

"I favour England right now," Hogg told Omnisport.

"They've been dominating international cricket in the one-day scene over the past two years, but the way they handled that pressure situation against Australia - that was a huge moment for them. I thought they were going to buckle under pressure.

"For England, the middle order, I still think is vulnerable. But they've got Ben Stokes down there. With the bat and ball, he handles the pressure situations and he is the key for England for me."

Hogg is insistent the decider will be close - and decided by the impact all-rounders can have with the bat.

That is despite the fact England openers Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow have posted four 100-plus partnerships for the first wicket in seven attempts at the tournament.

"I don't think the English openers are going to have that success again in the final," he added.

"The game will be won by the all-rounders, so [Jimmy] Neesham, [Colin] de Grandhomme versus Ben Stokes and [England wicket-keeper Jos] Buttler."

Hogg also warned against complacency for England. Eoin Morgan's side enter the final on the back of successive wins against India, New Zealand and Australia, form that has them big favourites to win the World Cup.

"New Zealand aren't the Easybeats," he said. "They stand up, they fight. I think the key player for NZ is [Matt] Henry. Can he continue the momentum that he had against the Indians in the semi-final with a beautiful opening spell?

"They had Tim Southee there as opening bowler for a long time but he hasn't been in form. Henry's taken that spot and he's holding the fort at the moment. He is the key for NZ to continue handling that pressure."

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