Roger Federer's bid to win a record-equalling seventh Australian Open crown continues against Filip Krajinovic in the second round on Wednesday.

Federer trails Novak Djokovic's record haul of seven titles at Melbourne Park following last year's shock fourth-round exit.

The most successful men's player in history, 20-time grand slam champion Federer has not added to his major tally in two years.

However, the 38-year-old once again looms as a threat and we take a closer look at where the third seed is at ahead of a midweek encounter in Melbourne.

 

Form and results

Federer did not play a lead-up tournament but there were no signs of rust from the Swiss sensation in the opening round. The veteran produced a polished display against Steve Johnson, hitting 34 winners and 20 unforced errors on Monday.

R1: bt Johnson 6-3 6-2 6-2

Next up

Krajinovic awaits Federer after a gruelling opening to his campaign at Melbourne Park on Tuesday. The 27-year-old Serbian was on court for almost four hours as he outlasted Quentin Halys 7-6 (9-7) 7-6 (7-1) 3-6 4-6 7-5 on Court 22. He will not have much time to recover, with a daunting midweek showdown with an all-time great.

Draw

If, as expected, Federer sees off Krajinovic under the Rod Laver Arena lights, a third-round meeting with either John Millman or 31st seed Hubert Hurkacz is next. A clash with Grigor Dimitrov in the fourth round could also be on the horizon.

What he said

"When you win it's all good. Or even when you make a semis and beyond, you know you're in good shape, plus you're just coming off the off-season so you have the confidence. You have practice, you know, flowing through your body, too. The problem is sometimes when you play too many matches and you don't have that practice block, in a way you're just playing to win, just trying to weasel your way to the next victory and you forget how to properly play tennis. So I think the Australian Open, it's nice if you play well, but there is no drama as if it doesn't go well for the rest of the season. It's worse if later in the season success is not there and you're missing that block of practice and you can't rely on it anymore because it's too far back."

Rafael Nadal insists he is unfazed about potentially winning his 20th grand slam title at the Australian Open.

The world number one started his campaign in Melbourne with a 6-2 6-3 6-0 victory over Hugo Dellien on Tuesday.

After winning two grand slams last year, Nadal is just one away from joining Roger Federer on a men's record 20 major titles.

But the Spaniard is refusing to think about potentially reaching the tally ahead of a second-round match with Federico Delbonis or Joao Sousa.

"No. I think about Sousa or Delbonis. That's all. I think about my practice of tomorrow, try to follow up the level of tennis that I played in the third set. That should be my main goal today," Nadal told a news conference.

"I need to play at my highest level if I want to keep going in the tournament. If I am able to reach my highest level, that's the thing that I have to worry about. If I am able to play at my highest level, normally I am able to produce some good chances. If not, impossible.

"I don't care about 20 or 15 or 16. I just care about try to keep going, keep enjoying my tennis career. It's not like 20 is the number that I need to reach. If I reach 20, fantastic. If I reach 21, better. If I reach 19, super happy about all the things that I did in my tennis career.

"I am very satisfied about my tennis career because I give it all most of the time. That's the only thing that matters because, honestly, it's something I don't really think about.

"I don't think in the future achieving 21 grand slams, for example, I'm going to be happier than if I am 19 in 10 years. I won the US Open a few months ago, and I was super happy in that moment. But today I'm happier than if I didn't win the US Open? Probably not. That's the only thing that matters in this life.

"Of course, I want to do it the best way possible because that's what I am doing since the beginning of my life almost. But the only thing I can do is put all my efforts in trying to keep going the best way possible. The rest of the things, the future will see."

Rafael Nadal outclassed Hugo Dellien in a straight-sets win in the Australian Open first round on Tuesday.

The world number one proved too good for Dellien on a sunny Rod Laver Arena, winning 6-2 6-3 6-0 in two hours, two minutes.

Nadal's bid to join Roger Federer on 20 grand slam titles started with a comfortable victory, although he was forced to grind early.

In the end, the Spaniard's relentless consistency was too much for Bolivian world number 73 Dellien, with either Federico Delbonis or Joao Sousa awaiting Nadal in the second round.

Dellien tried to match it with Nadal from the baseline during a lengthy first set, but he made too many mistakes – 20 unforced errors – to seriously threaten.

A forehand winner gave Nadal a break and 2-0 lead and he took the opening five games before Dellien got on the board, but the Spaniard closed out a 52-minute first set.

Dellien stayed with Nadal until the sixth game of the second set, but the pair traded breaks before the latter struck again to take complete control of the encounter.

Nadal broke Dellien's resistance – and serve – to begin the third set on his way to a commanding victory.

 

STATISTICAL BREAKDOWN
Rafael Nadal [1] bt Hugo Dellien 6-2 6-3 6-0

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Nadal – 38/21
Dellien – 15/34

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Nadal – 5/5
Dellien – 0/2

BREAK POINTS WON
Nadal – 8/18
Dellien – 2/5

FIRST SERVE PERCENTAGE
Nadal – 62
Dellien – 72

PERCENTAGE OF POINTS WON ON FIRST/SECOND SERVE
Nadal – 70/59
Dellien – 50/32

TOTAL POINTS
Nadal – 96
Dellien – 64

Novak Djokovic heads into the Australian Open second round on the back of dropping a rare set in his first outing in Melbourne.

The Serbian star, a record seven-time champion of the event, needed four sets to get through his opener.

Still, Djokovic remains on track ahead of facing wildcard Tatsuma Ito in the second round on Wednesday.

We take a closer look at the 16-time grand slam champion's form heading into the clash.

Form and results

Even Djokovic managed a first in his opening-round win. The 32-year-old dropped a set and won in the Australian Open first round for the first time in his career by getting past Jan-Lennard Struff in four. The last time he had dropped a set in his opener in Melbourne was in 2006, when he was beaten by Paul Goldstein. Djokovic may be better off for the test, having gone 6-0 in singles at the ATP Cup to begin his 2020.

R1: bt Struff 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 2-6 6-1

Next up

Due to rain, Ito's opener was pushed back to Tuesday, but the 31-year-old from Japan needed little time to brush past lucky loser Prajnesh Gunneswaran 6-4 6-2 7-5. Ito is the world number 146, but did manage a best ranking of 60 in 2012. However, he has played mostly on the Challenger Tour since 2013 and has never met Djokovic, who will be favoured to ease through.

Draw

If Djokovic gets past Ito as expected, he will face 30th seed Dan Evans or Japan's Yoshihito Nishioka in the third round. Diego Schwartzman (14th seed) and Dusan Lajovic (24th) are potential fourth-round opponents.

What he said

"It’s great to be back in this arena that has a very special place in my heart. This has been by far the most successful court in my career, I love coming back to Australia, the land of tennis. I want to thank everyone for staying until midnight and supporting both players."

Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic savoured his win over Jan-Lennard Struff, highlighting his grand slam success after difficult first-round matches.   

Djokovic - eyeing a record-extending eighth Australian Open title - kicked off his title defence with a hard-fought 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 2-6 6-1 victory against tenacious German Struff in Melbourne on Monday.

The 16-time slam champion looked set to close out a straight-sets win after surviving a tense first set, in which he committed 12 unforced errors, before Struff rallied to force a fourth on Rod Laver Arena.

Djokovic, though, was not to be denied a 900th ATP career victory and the Serb star told reporters: "I actually like tough first rounds in grand slams particularly.

"Historically I had lots of success in grand slams where I had tough opponents in the first round. Because it gets me going. 

"From the beginning I have to be alert, I have to be on a high level. I think I was."

Djokovic, who will face either Japanese wildcard Tatsuma Ito or lucky loser Prajnesh Gunneswaran in the second round, added: "Overall it was a really solid start, especially in the second and the fourth set I played on a higher level. [I] served pretty good, lots of aces, high percentage of first serves in.

"I felt kind of in control of the match. Even when I lost the third set I just felt like 'if I am on the right level, I have the upper hand'. I ended this match in a good fashion, in a right way and this is very positive."

Novak Djokovic vowed to "enjoy every moment" after reaching the second round of the Australian Open on an opening day that saw seeds Denis Shapovalov and Borna Coric crash out.

Djokovic started the defence of his title with a battling 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 2-6 6-1 victory over Jan-Lennard Struff at Melbourne Park on Monday.

Losing his serve three times while dropping the third set and having to edge a close tie-break in the opener meant Djokovic spent longer than he would have hoped on court, but he relished the two-hour-and-16-minute encounter.

Asked about winning his 900th Tour-level match, the second seed said: "I'm obviously very proud of all the achievements, but at the same time I try to remind myself how grateful I am to be playing this sport at a high level at this stage of my career. 

"I can't take things for granted, I'm trying to enjoy every moment. It's a New Year resolution, to enjoy more. It's easier said than done when you're on the court.

"Especially in my position, I'm expected to win all my matches, there's a lot of pressure and emotions involved. But I try to really enjoy it, the two and half hours spent on court were a lot of fun."


SHAPOVALOV AND CORIC FALL AT FIRST HURDLE

The biggest shock of the day saw number 13 seed Shapovalov fall to a four-set defeat against Hungarian world number 67 Marton Fucsovics.

Fucsovics won 7-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-1 7-6 (7-3) in three hours and 13 minutes as the highly-rated Canadian crashed out.

Shapovalov lost his temper with the umpire when he was giving a code violation for racket abuse despite it not being damaged.

"I think that's a terrible call from the [umpire]," Shapovalov said. "The rule [according to] what I know is that if I break my racket, yeah you can code me, but you can't code me for slamming it.

"I'm not doing anything and it didn't impact anyone and the racket was still intact. He gave me a warning because I did it two or three times and I think that's not the way it works."

Number 25 seed Coric was eliminated in straight sets by Sam Querrey. 

The American won 6-3 6-4 6-4 as a dreadful run for Coric, which has seen him win only one of his last 10 matches, went on.
 

FEDERER AND TSITSIPAS COAST THROUGH

Roger Federer progressed in comfortable fashion, the third seed seeing off Steve Johnson 6-3 6-2 6-2 in only 81 minutes.

Johnson only forced one break-point opportunity in the match against the 20-time grand slam and did not convert it.

Sixth seed Stefanos Tsitsipas, the ATP Finals champion and a semi-finalist in Melbourne last year, got off to a smooth start, defeating Salvatore Caruso 6-0 6-2 6-3.

 

RAIN LEAVES MATCHES UNFINISHED

Inclement weather left a host of Monday's other first-round matches incomplete, with Reilly Opelka closing in on an upset against Fabio Fognini when play was suspended at 6-3 7-6 (7-3) 1-0.

Rising star Jannik Sinner has a 2-0 lead over Max Purcell with the third set level at 4-4, while Roberto Bautista Agut was a set up against Feliciano Lopez.

Milos Raonic is one game away from a first-round win, his match against Lorenzo Giustino all-but over with the Canadian 6-2 6-1 5-2 to the good.

Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic started his title defence with a 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 2-6 6-1 victory over Jan-Lennard Struff on Monday. 

Djokovic survived a scare on Rod Laver Arena, but the 16-time grand slam champion eventually moved into the second round at Melbourne Park.

Eyeing a record-extending eighth Australian Open title, second seed Djokovic will face either Tatsuma Ito or Prajnesh Gunneswaran for a spot in the third round.

World number 37 Struff presented a tricky opening test for Djokovic, especially with Craig O'Shannessy - the Serbian star's former chief strategist - now in his corner. 

Struff, who had never beaten Djokovic, Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal, was not overawed, displaying aggression from the baseline and net.

Despite blinking first as Djokovic broke for a 4-2 lead and consolidated for a 5-2 advantage, Struff was unperturbed and reeled off three consecutive games, despite saving a set point along the way, to level the match and then force a tie-break.

Djokovic, however, managed to hold off the tenacious German in a tense and taxing breaker, using a wide serve to close it out at the second time of asking.

Struff was clearly feeling the effects when he quickly fell 2-0 behind at the start of the second, and Djokovic never relinquished the advantage before he broke again for a two-sets-to-love lead.

It seemed routine for Djokovic but he suffered an uncharacteristic stumble in the third as Struff's chances of a huge upset returned.

The pair traded breaks before the Djokovic serve went AWOL, allowing Struff to move 4-2 up before Djokovic served two double faults at 2-5, 30-30 to hand Struff a lifeline.

Normality was swiftly resumed in the fourth, however, Djokovic breaking in the opening game and again for a 4-1 lead before closing it out on the Struff serve to seal his 900th Tour level win.

 

STATISTICAL BREAKDOWN
Novak Djokovic [2] bt Jan-Lennard Struff 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 2-6 6-1

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Djokovic – 44/28
Struff – 39/34

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Djokovic – 14/3
Struff – 13/7

BREAK POINTS WON
Djokovic – 64%
Struff – 80%

FIRST SERVE PERCENTAGE
Djokovic – 65
Struff – 56

PERCENTAGE OF POINTS WON ON FIRST/SECOND SERVE
Djokovic – 77/50
Struff – 65/41

TOTAL POINTS
Djokovic – 113
Struff – 91

Roger Federer hopes to set up his Australian Open campaign in the first three rounds after making an impressive start on Monday.

Despite not playing a lead-up tournament, the Swiss great looked in fine form in a 6-3 6-2 6-2 victory over Steve Johnson on Rod Laver Arena.

Federer, a 20-time grand slam champion, said the early rounds would be key after opting against competitive matches ahead of the year's first major.

"I just haven't played proper matches in many, many weeks, and a lot of guys, probably 95 per cent of the guys, are coming here with matches. I'm not one of those guys," he told a news conference.

"Now I have one. Best of five, too, which is even better. I think for me really the first three rounds are key to get going, to get used to the pressure, stay calm, when to save break point or 30-30 points or whatever it may be or just to stay calm if you're down a set and a break or whatever it might be.

"This is sort of the unknown that can be a little bit scary at times. But today there was none of that because I broke early each set and was able to get on a roll, play freely after that. And also felt I had margin.

"Anything I was doing I felt like I had the game under control. That might not be the case in the next round, so I just think I have to be careful.

"Round by round, point for point mentality. I know other guys that are playing extremely well right now so I think it's just important to stay very calm about things right now."

Federer produced a polished display against Johnson, hitting 34 winners and 20 unforced errors.

And, asked about the court speed, Federer said it was similar to last year at Melbourne Park.

"I think balls play fast when they are new, a ball change for a couple of games, depending on who you play, how long the rallies are right then," he said.

"But I'd say two to four games it can play faster. But the balls fluff up extremely quickly here when you do get into long rallies. And I feel night sessions or indoor or on a cool day like what we will see in the next week, actually play quite slow. It is what it is, you know.

"But I think it depends on how you play maybe also and how you manage your game and what kind of opponent you have, for all sort of playing styles, I guess."

Roger Federer produced a polished display in a first-round thrashing of Steve Johnson at the Australian Open on Monday.

The Swiss great opted against playing a lead-up tournament, but showed no signs of rustiness in a 6-3 6-2 6-2 victory over Johnson at Rod Laver Arena.

Federer, a 20-time grand slam champion, was in control throughout, with not even a first-set rain delay able to halt a strong performance.

A six-time winner in Melbourne, Federer had won his previous two meetings with Johnson in straight sets, and he made it three in a row.

Federer took early control against Johnson, racing out to a 3-0 lead before rain delayed play after the fifth game.

But, the brief pause did little to slow Federer, especially under the Rod Laver Arena roof.

He took the first set and grabbed a 4-0 lead in the second, another break to begin the third seeing him on his way to a convincing victory.

Federer will face either Filip Krajinovic or qualifier Quentin Halys in the second round.

Rafael Nadal's bid to join Roger Federer on 20 grand slam titles begins against Hugo Dellien at the Australian Open on Tuesday.

Spanish star Nadal won two majors last year, taking his tally to 19 after clinching the US Open crown.

But despite making four finals since 2012, Nadal has failed to add to his one crown in Melbourne, where he was successful in 2009.

We take a closer look at where the 33-year-old is at as he prepares to begin his Australian Open campaign.

 

Form and results

Nadal prepared for the year's first grand slam by playing at the ATP Cup, where he appeared in decent form. He posted wins over Pablo Cuevas, Nikoloz Basilashvili, Yoshihito Nishioka and Alex de Minaur, but was also beaten twice, going down to David Goffin and Novak Djokovic as Spain finished as runners-up.

First up

He will face Dellien for the first time when the duo meet in Melbourne. The Bolivian enjoyed a good 2019, although the majority of his success came on the Challenger Tour. Dellien held a 12-16 win-loss record at ATP Tour level, while he was destroyed 6-0 6-1 by Michael Mmoh in qualifying in Auckland to begin 2020. Nadal has lost just once in the first round at the Australian Open – in 2016 – but it is hard to see a repeat upset.

Draw

Nadal will face either Federico Delbonis or Joao Sousa if he gets past Dellien as expected. In the third round, fellow Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta may await.

What he said

"It's true that I went through some tough situations during all my career, but I was able to always, with probably the positive attitude and with the right people around, that they were a key, I was able to find a way to keep going. It's something that's difficult to imagine for me because for my style of game, as a lot of people said my career should be little bit shorter. But here we are. Happy for that. Even for me is a big surprise to be where I am at my age. So happy for everything. Just enjoying the situation."

Novak Djokovic has already shown fine form this year ahead of facing Jan-Lennard Struff at the Australian Open on Monday.

A record seven-time champion in Melbourne, the Serbian will take some stopping once again at the year's first grand slam.

Djokovic was strong during the back end of last year, aside from his ATP Finals failure, and has started 2020 impressively.

We take a closer look at where the 16-time major champion is at ahead of his opener.

 

Form and results

Djokovic led Serbia to ATP Cup success to begin the year, and he did so in style. The 32-year-old recorded singles wins over Rafael Nadal and Daniil Medvedev during that run, while also beating Denis Shapovalov, Gael Monfils, Kevin Anderson and Christian Garin. If anyone was doubting he would be hard to beat in Australia, those questions were quickly answered.

Awaiting him in the first round is Struff, who would appear one of the trickier tasks given the German is ranked 37th in the world. Struff enjoyed a strong 2019 that included reaching semi-finals in Auckland and Stuttgart and the last eight in Barcelona and Basel, while he stunned Alexander Zverev at Indian Wells. However, Djokovic has enjoyed two straight-sets wins over Struff in their previous two meetings, including a 6-3 6-2 6-2 victory at the French Open last year.

Draw

Djokovic should encounter few early problems. Wildcard Tatsuma Ito or lucky loser Prajnesh Gunneswaran await if he gets past Struff, while 30th seed Dan Evans could be his third-round opponent.

What he said

"Milestones are definitely a motivation, I think. At the same time they make me proud of what I have achieved in my career. They give even more significance to why I'm competing in professional tennis still. But at the same time, there's some other higher goals that I have kind of as a driving force I think more than any other milestone. But they all are important."

Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic said a changing of the guard is "inevitable" as the next generation of tennis players close the gap on the "Big Three".

Djokovic (16), Roger Federer (20) and Rafael Nadal (19) have dominated the ATP Tour circuit, combining for 55 grand slam titles and numerous other trophies.

While Djokovic, Federer and Nadal continue to lead the way and set the standard despite their advancing years, the world number two knows the younger generation will soon have their day.

As seven-time Australian Open champion Djokovic prepares for Monday's opener against Jan-Lennard Struff in Melbourne, the Serb star told reporters: "They're coming closer and closer. It's obvious.

"[Daniil] Medvedev had a great fight with Rafa in the last Grand Slam in US Open of last season. [Stefanos] Tsitsipas played semis here last year. Dominic Thiem twice finals in French Open. They're very, very close. They're literally one set away. On a given day, in the very near future, I think that can happen. It's going to happen. It's inevitable.

"What they're missing? I don't think they are missing too much, to be honest. I think they possess very powerful games that require a lot of skills, and they have those skills. They have put in the hours and dedicated themselves on and off the court. I think a lot of those next generation players working very hard, being very professional. That's a good sign because that's one of the precursors.

"But at the same time to win a slam and also to kind of be consistently on the top level for many years, it takes I think a player to gain that mental and emotional maturity and experience to understand his own strengths, to kind of fight his own fears, to really be able to maintain that level for a long time. Rafa, Roger, and I, obviously because of the past 10,15 years, we know what we need to do mentally also in this particular situation. That gives us probably a little bit of an edge.

"Everything has to kind of intertwine and everything has to be, I guess, in balance. When I say 'everything' I mean mental, physical, emotional. Then of course you need to have luck on that day and for the stars to align to win a Grand Slam trophy. They're very close. I don't think that's miles, miles away maybe as it was some years ago. I think they are definitely hungry. They are challenging. They're knocking on the door."

Djokovic heads into his title defence on the back of a memorable but gruelling ATP Cup campaign in Australia as Serbia triumphed.

On his preparations, the second seed added: "I did not have such an intensive couple of weeks the year before the Australian Open for many years. I did have participation in Doha tournament, Hopman Cup before, everything.

"It was a lot of physical and emotional energy being spent in the ATP Cup… We as a team won the title, which was definitely one of the highlights of my career. It was phenomenal couple of weeks and great lead up to Australian Open. But it did take a lot out of me. I did adjust my training sessions towards that, so I had a little bit more of recuperation rather than just stepping on accelerator a little bit more."

The 108th edition of the Australian Open begins on Monday as the world's best tennis players battle it out at the first grand slam of 2020.

Novak Djokovic and Naomi Osaka will return to defend the titles they won last year, adding to the event's storied history.

The pair will face stiff competition from stacked fields in the men's and women's draw as a host of players seek glory in Melbourne.

To whet your appetite for the forthcoming feast of tennis, here is a selection of the best Opta facts related to the Australian Open.

 

- The last three years have seen the 12 women's grand slam tournaments being won by 10 different players; only Simona Halep and Osaka have won twice in that span.

- Djokovic won his seventh Australian Open title in 2019, the most of any male player in the history of the tournament. He has won the event every time he has reached the semi-finals.

- Of the last 14 editions of the Australian Open, 12 have been won by either Djokovic (7) or Roger Federer (5) – Rafael Nadal (2009) and Stan Wawrinka (2014) are the only other winners in that period.

- Victoria Azarenka (2012, 2013), Serena Williams (2009, 2010) and Jennifer Capriati (2001, 2002) are the only women to have won successive titles at the Australian Open since 2000.

- Federer won his sixth Australian Open title in 2018, 14 years after his first win at the event; no player has won multiple Australian Open titles over a longer period in the Open Era. It is his last win in a grand slam tournament to date.

- Since 2005 only Williams (2010, 2015) and Azarenka (2013) have won the title at the Australian Open as the number one ranked player in the world.

- Williams has not won any of the last 11 grand slams, with her last victory coming at the Australian Open in 2017 when she was pregnant – this is the American's longest span without a major title.

- Petra Kvitova lost in the final of the Australian Open last year, the only time she went further than the quarter-finals in her last 19 grand slam appearances, since winning Wimbledon in 2014.

- Either Nadal or Andy Murray has been the runner-up in nine of the last 10 Australian Open men's finals, Murray losing five times and Nadal four. Marin Cilic in 2018 is the only other player to lose an Australian Open final in that span.

- The last time an Australian made it to the men's final at the Australian Open was Lleyton Hewitt in 2005 and the last Australian to win the title was Mark Edmondson in 1976 (against fellow Australian John Newcombe).

Roger Federer begins his Australian Open campaign on Monday against a man he is yet to drop a set against.

The Swiss 20-time grand slam champion decided against playing a lead-up tournament ahead of the year's first major, where he faces Steve Johnson.

Despite the lack of competitive matches, it would still take a monumental upset to send Federer packing in the opening round.

We take a closer look at where the six-time champion in Melbourne is at ahead of the first round.

 

Form and results

Federer has been out of competitive action since the ATP Finals in November, when he suffered a semi-final loss to Stefanos Tsitsipas. The 38-year-old did edge Nick Kyrgios 7-6 (8-6) in an exhibition set at the 'Rally for Relief' event on Wednesday.

First up

In contrast, his first-round opponent, Johnson, is coming off a Challenger Tour title win in Bendigo. A former world number 21, the American almost dropped out of the top 100 last year, but already has seven wins at Challenger level in 2020. Federer holds a 2-0 head-to-head record over Johnson, but was pushed to two tie-break sets in their last meeting at Indian Wells in 2017. Federer's last first-round loss at a major was at the 2003 French Open, while he is 20-0 in the Australian Open first round.

Draw

Federer is in the bottom half of the draw and will face either Filip Krajinovic or qualifier Quentin Halys if he gets past Johnson. If results go by ranking, Hubert Hurkacz will await in the third round.

What he said

"I'm excited to play Steve. He's a good guy. I think with his old-school playing – big forehand, slice backhand, good serve – I think it's going to be a nice match for me, as well."

Denis Shapovalov would not play in the Australian Open if he felt conditions were unsafe amid continued concern over the air quality in Melbourne.

Bushfires that have ravaged Australia in recent weeks led to a smoky haze drifting over Victoria, having a significant impact on qualifying for the first grand slam of 2020.

Dalila Jakupovic had to retire from her qualifying match in distressing scenes after suffering a coughing fit during the second set against Stefanie Voegele.

Tennis Australia has since published its air quality policy, which states play will be suspended if the concentration of P2.5 particles, which can impair lung function, exceeds 200 micrograms per cubic metre.

The policy indicates there will be a discussion between medical staff and officials about whether it is advisable to play when the score is between 97 and 200.

Speaking ahead of the tournament, where he will face Marton Fucsovics in the first round on Monday, Shapovalov was asked what he would do if he believed conditions to be unsafe.

"I wouldn't play," he replied. "Obviously it's a grand slam, it's a big opportunity, but I'm 20 years old.

"I don't want to risk my life, risk my health being out there in these conditions when I can play for the next 10, 15 years.

"For my own health, if it gets bad, I just don't see what the point is. I think everyone's kind of on the same page. I don't think I've seen anyone happy with the way things are being dealt with."

On the air quality policy, he added: "They send some email and say they have professionals looking at it and they use the term 'playable'.

"For me it's just like, it's not great. You get warnings from the news telling people to stay inside, that it's not good to be outside, breathing this stuff in.

"And then you get an email from the tournament saying it's playable and you guys have to go out there and put your life in jeopardy, put your health in jeopardy.

"You see the effects on players it has right now, the last couple of days, but also you don't know what it's going to do later in our lives and how it could affect us if we're breathing this air in for two weeks."

 

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