Rahkeem Cornwall five-for leaves win, loss or draw on the table in Red Force-Hurricanes match-up

By March 01, 2020
Rahkeem Cornwall Rahkeem Cornwall

The Trinidad and Tobago Red Force have it in their hands to decide if their West Indies Championship game against the Leeward Islands Hurricanes at Warner Park in St Kitts ends in a win, loss or draw.

The Red Force, going into Sunday’s final day, enjoy a lead of 130 runs with four second-innings wickets still intact.

Of course, they need quite a few more runs to ensure they do not lose to the Leeward Islands Hurricanes, who made 251 in their first innings.

Batting first, the Hurricanes scored 287 thanks to a lower-order fightback from Terrance Ward, who scored 89 to save them from a particularly poor total against an all-round bowling performance from the Hurricanes, including 3-62 from Jermiah Lewis, 2-87 from Sheeno Berridge, 2-43 from Nino Henry, and 2-74 from Rahkeem Cornwall.

The Hurricanes’ 251-run reply came on the back of Amir Jangoo’s 90, and against Imran Khan’s 4-67.

There were also two wickets apiece for Anderson Phillip (2-54), Akeal Hosein (2-52), and Uthman Muhammed (2-51).

On Saturday, the penultimate day of the contest, the Red Force made their way to 94-6, with Joshua Da Silva not out on 45. Hosein has joined him at the crease but is yet to score.

The Red Force have to bat long enough to ensure the Hurricanes do not have time to overhaul their target but must be wary of Cornwall who has sent five of the six batsmen to have fallen back to the pavilion. Cornwall has 5-29 so far this innings and seven wickets in the match.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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