Chemar Holder wrecks Scorpions as Pride race to 119-run victory at Sabina

By January 26, 2020

Former West Indies Under-19 World Cup-winning pacer Chemar Holder led the demolition of the Jamaica Scorpions batting with a career-best return, propelling Barbados Pride to a 119-run victory in the West Indies Championship on Saturday.

Holder, 21, sharing the new ball with West Indies pacer Kemar Roach, bowled with pace and hostility, undermining the Scorpions batting for the second time in the match and paving the way for a commanding victory for the Pride on the third day of third-round matches in the Championship.

Holder bagged 6-47 from 14.3 overs to follow up his first-innings five-wicket blast and ended with match figures of 11-92, making him a shoo-in for the Player of the Match award.

Chasing 288 for victory, the Scorpions never recovered after they slumped to 37 for four before lunch.

Nkrumah Bonner led the way with 39 and Denis Smith, the former Volcanoes wicketkeeper/batsman from Grenada, added 26, but no other batsman reached 20.

The most defiant period for the Scorpions was a 49-run stand for the seventh wicket between Smith and Derval Green, which carried them past 100, but there was to be no comeback story for the hosts.

The result gave Pride their second successive win for the season and a haul of 18.8 points, and Scorpions failed to fashion an escape plan on the third time of asking this season, slumping to their first defeat after they drew their first two matches.

Earlier, there was token resistance from the Pride tail-enders after the visitors resumed from their overnight total of 179 for six.

Pride added 27 before they were bowled out inside the first half-hour, but no batsman reached 20.

Scorpions pacer Nicholson Gordon claimed three of the last four wickets to finish with a career-best 6-45 from 15 overs.

Scores: Pride (219) & (206) beat Scorpions (138) & (168) by 119 runs at Sabina Park in Kingston, Jamaica

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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