West Indies all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite is confident his side can bounce back from their 59-run defeat Sunday to level their ODI series against India in the second ODI in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.

Windies T20 skipper Carlos Brathwaite insists that he was encouraged by aspects of the team performance, despite a 22-runs loss to India at Lauderhill on Sunday.

The result saw the visitors claim a second straight win over the regional team and an unassailable 2-0 lead in the three-match series.  India won the first contest of the series on Saturday by four wickets with 16 balls remaining after the Windies were restricted to 95-9.

On Sunday, fueled by the furious Rohit Sharma, India made 167 for 5 during their time at the crease.  Sharma made 67 from 51 balls, in the process passing Windies talisman Chris Gayle for the most T20 sixes.  The Caribbean team made made 98-4 in their reply in the second encounter, but a storm brought a premature end to the contest, with the team still some way short of the adjusted target of 121.

Rovman Powell offered the most resistance for the Windies scoring six boundaries and three sixes, reaching 54 before he was lbw to Krunal Pandya (2-23).

“I didn't think it went wrong to be fair. I think we had a solid enough base, so we still backed ourselves to get 70 odd, but very well played to Rovman to get us into that situation,” Brathwaite said following the encounter.

“I give the batting a bit more credit than yesterday. With the total we figured our lineup is flexible enough, with guys like Pollard at the end to set Rovman up. Batting-wise we were a lot closer to where we want to be. In Guyana we hope to get consistency.”

A 100 per cent fit Sunil Narine is happy to be back bowling for the West Indies and had an immediate impact on the first T20 against India in Fort Lauderdale despite his team’s four-wicket loss.

Defending a paltry 95, the West Indies were in trouble but Narine with figures of 2-14, from his four overs, showed great control and the ability to still take wickets.

“Sunil's four overs very important, he showed his experience, brought us back into the game. Great bowling effort,” said Narine's skipper, Carlos Brathwaite.

"Always good to be back in maroon. Being able to perform for the country is a proud moment,” said Narine after his efforts.

The mystery spinner has been troubled with a finger injury and the workout in Lauderhill was a good way to test where he was.

“Fitness is there, finger is now 100%,” said Narine.

Now, the spinner says his goal is to find consistency.

“T20 I'm trying to stay on for as long as I can. Let's see how it goes. We still have to play positively, start well in the Powerplay, whether we're batting or bowling,” explained Narine.

That positive intent, Narine believes, is the key to winning games again for the West Indies.

“We've to start winning matches. No new thing at the moment, just enjoying my cricket. Hopefully you can see good performances in the near future."

Windies skipper, Carlos Brathwaite believes his unit could have made a fight of the first T20 international against India in Lauderhill on Saturday had there been but a few better decisions with the bat.

According to the skipper, the T20 side, stacked with new-ish faces, not for the first time, did not adapt to the conditions they were faced with after early-morning showers made batting a little tougher.

“Once again don't think we assessed conditions,” said Brathwaite after the game the West Indies lost by four wickets.

Batting first, the ‘home’ side amassed a paltry 95-9 from their 20 overs, thanks in large part to Kieron Pollard’s run-a-ball 49.

Sent to bat at number four, Pollard showed experience in waiting for the right moments to get the scoring going, but fell in the 20th over.

Brathwaite paid attention.

“Kudos to Kieron coming back into the team. He showed his experience,” he said.

“Had we made 130, it would've been a different game. We batted ourselves out of the game,” said a disappointed Brathwaite.

The skipper admits that the West Indies style of being aggressive up front would not change, but that there were still better decisions to be made when doing so.

“We have to play positively. The message will continue to be to keep intent, but we need to have better shot selection and awareness,” said the skipper.

Carlos Brathwaite has come to Andre Russell's defence after the West Indies all-rounder appeared in the Global T20 (GT20) in Canada hours after pulling out of an international match injured.

Russell saw his Cricket World Cup cut short with a left knee injury and then aggravated the issue in the GT20.

The 31-year-old had been named in the Windies' squad for their first two Twenty20 internationals against India pending a fitness test, yet he informed selectors of his inability to feature.

However, hours after Jason Mohammed was called up in his place, Russell turned out again for Vancouver Knights in the GT20.

Brathwaite believes Russell receives too much criticism for his patchy fitness record, however, suggesting he instead deserves credit for trying to play when possible.

The Windies skipper suggested Russell was playing for Vancouver without being "100 per cent" but did not wish to risk producing below-par performances for his country.

"I think he's been knocked in the press a bit because of his injury woes," Brathwaite told a news conference. "And I think it's easy for us to see him hobbling around the field and just take for granted that he's injured.

"But we can also look at it on the other side and say he could be home, he could be elsewhere and not trying to play for the West Indies.

"Speaking for myself as captain of the T20 team, and speaking for myself as Andre's friend, whenever we speak about playing for West Indies, that's always his main goal.

"And we've seen in the World Cup, whether he was 100 per cent or not – it's debatable – the fact that he wanted to be at the World Cup, wanted to pull on the shirt and wanted to perform for the people in the West Indies and his mates in the dressing room, I think, is testament to the person he is.

"I think we need to start commending the fact that he actually tries to get on the park and stop lambasting the fact that he probably doesn't stay on it till the end of the 50 overs or the 20 overs.

"Even against my better judgment, I told him to sit out this series. But he really wanted to play, he really wanted to come and show off his skills and show off what he does in franchise cricket for the West Indies.

"Unfortunately, he took another knock and he doesn't think that, if he comes here, he'd be doing justice to other people who could be here and are 100 per cent.

"Obviously, he's a big loss, not only on the field but off the field. In the dressing room, in and around the team, he's a big character, very jovial and, in my eyes, a leader in the dressing room as well.

"But obviously, if we need to get him ready for the Twenty20 World Cup, we have to do without him for a couple of series.

"I prefer that than pushing him in this series and making a long-term injury."

West Indies T20 captain Carlos Brathwaite has come to the defence of injured teammate Andre Russell, who he believes has come in for some harsh press after a number of injuries have impacted his international output.

After feeling discomfort during the Global T20 Canada, Andre Russell asked to be excused from duty for the West Indies in the first T20 internationals against India in the Caribbean.

During a pre-match press conference, Brathwaite, made it clear where he stood on the issue.

Brathwaite tackled those who thought Russell did a disservice to the West Indies’ World Cup hopes, saying:

"And speaking for myself as captain of the T20 team and speaking for myself as Andre's friend, whenever we speak about playing for West Indies, that's always his main goal. And we've seen in the World Cup -whether he was 100% or not, it's debatable - but the fact that he wanted to be at the World Cup, wanted to pull on the shirt and wanted to perform for the people in the West Indies and his mates in the dressing room, I think, is testament to the person he is. And I think we need to start commending the fact that he actually tries to get on the park and stop lambasting the fact that he probably doesn't stay on it till the end of the 50 overs or the 20 overs,” said Brathwaite.

According to the skipper, the more important part of the equation, is Russell’s willingness to play for the West Indies.

"I think he's been knocked in the press a bit because of his injury woes. And I think it's easy for us to see him hobbling around the field and just take for granted that he's injured but we can also look at it on the other side and say he can be home, he could be elsewhere and not trying to play for the West Indies.

Russell, Brathwaite revealed, would have played in these T20s if prodded to do so, despite his less-than-100 per cent fitness status.

"Even against my better judgment, I told him to sit out this series, but he really wanted to play, he really wanted to come and show off his skills and show off what he does in franchise cricket for the West Indies. Unfortunately, he took another knock and he doesn't think that if he comes here that he'd be doing justice to other people who could be here and are 100%. Obviously, he's a big loss, not only on the field but off the field. In the dressing room, in and around the team, he's a big character, very jovial and in my eyes, a leader in the dressing room as well,” said Brathwaite.

The skipper then asked that the press look at the bigger picture, because there were other tournaments the West Indies have an eye on doing well at, tournaments Russell will be important to.

“ … Obviously, if we need to get him ready for the Twenty20 World Cup, we have to do without him for a couple of series, I prefer that than pushing him in this series and making a long term injury.”

Newly-appointed St Kitts and Nevis Patriots skipper Carlos Brathwaite has admitted that star player Chris Gayle will be a big loss both on and off the field for the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) franchise.

After two years with the Patriots, the 39-year-old Gayle will head back to his home country to join the Jamaica Tallawahs.  In two seasons with the franchise, Gayle led the team to the final in 2017, before being eliminated in the playoffs the following year.

In addition to his presence on the pitch, Brathwaite believes the player will also be missed in the team’s dressing room.

“Chris is now gone so we need to find a replacement for Chris, probably not in the same style that he would play, but with the results that he would normally bring to the team. Obviously, that’s another big character gone in the dressing room as well, so we have to manoeuvre slightly differently, but we need the same results where we challenge for the top four and then once we get to the top four, we challenge for the title,” Brathwaite said.

“I think people look for the shouting and the ‘hurrah’ and Chris is not necessarily that. He’s more calm, collective, cool. He leads by example. He has the respect of everyone in the dressing room, so whenever he speaks you know his words are worth the weight in gold. I think a lot of people take his coolness and his calm persona for granted but there’s very much a whole heap of respect in all the dressing rooms I’ve been fortunate enough to play alongside him in, everyone in the dressing room gives him maximum respect.”

 

 

 

Windies all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite admitted he was grateful for a maiden One Day International (ODI) century, despite a gut-wrenching loss against New Zealand on Saturday.

A controversial selection ahead of the ICC World Cup, Brathwaite had struggled to make any real impression at the tournament.  In three prior matches, his best scores were 16 against Australia and 14 against England.  He was dropped for Bangladesh and possibly only selected for New Zealand because of the injury to Andre Russell.

His sensational knock against New Zealand, however, resembled the player who promised so much after taking the West Indies over the line against England at the 2016 T20 World Cup.  With the Windies on the ropes, Brathwaite finally showed up and earned plenty of plaudits despite his efforts falling just short.

"It is a cliché to say that it doesn't matter if you don't win, but for me personally, for my confidence, it is a result of all the hard work that I put in," Brathwaite told Espncricinfo.

"It is finally good that it has come to fruition. I continue to work hard. Obviously heartbreaking to not get over the line but I give thanks for the performance and being able to get the team in the position that I was able to,” he added.

In the 2016 World Twenty20 final, Carlos Brathwaite faced the first ball of the last over. His side needed 19 runs to win and Brathwaite hammered four sixes in successive balls, steering West Indies to the most unlikely of victories.

Three years on, Brathwaite was again trying to do the near-impossible for his country on the big stage.

He walked into a baptism of fire at Old Trafford, facing a Lockie Ferguson hat-trick ball, but defended it before finding the boundary from the very next delivery. But the wickets kept on tumbling, part of a collapse that saw West Indies go from 142-2 to 164-7 in pursuit of a victory target of 292 against a New Zealand side who had started the Cricket World Cup in excellent form.

Those five wickets fell in as many overs and the only way of keeping the smallest chance of victory alive was to consolidate, so Brathwaite got to work. He took only three singles in a 17-ball spell and it took a Mitchell Santner delivery that was just asking to be hit for six to snap Brathwaite out of his funk. He duly obliged, sending it 96 metres, but showed the restraint and temperament so many of his team-mates lacked, by putting the cue back in the rack, at least momentarily.

Brathwaite batted for more than 11 overs with Kemar Roach, the latter departing with the score on 211. Another handy partnership followed with Sheldon Cottrell, the left-armer adding 15 runs to a terrific performance that included four wickets, two catches and a run-out. Cottrell even hit two fours in successive deliveries in the 43rd over, but when Ferguson claimed his 14th scalp of the World Cup, bowling Cottrell, West Indies were 245-9 with just five overs left.

Needing 47 more runs for victory, out strode Oshane Thomas, a number 11 batsman in every sense of the word, a man with just 14 runs to his name in 22 international appearances. West Indies were gone. Surely.

Not for the first time, Brathwaite had other ideas. He hit the next delivery for four, smashing Trent Boult – who snagged four wickets for New Zealand – over mid off, and showed faith in Thomas, taking a single from the third ball of the over. The next over followed a similar tune, Brathwaite hitting one boundary, this time a six, and leaving Thomas to see out the over.

The equation was getting tougher and tougher, 33 runs still required from the last three overs, with just one wicket in hand, but Brathwaite has previously showed he does not mind when the odds are stacked against him.

An over reminiscent of that 2016 decider was to follow, too, with Brathwaite taking a two off Matt Henry before clobbering three sixes in a row, over long on, backward point and long off respectively. Then he top-edged Henry for four and finished with a single, keeping the strike in a 25-run over that got fans across the world out of their seats. The impossible was now possible. 

As is so often the case in these types of run chases, the last few runs always seem the hardest, and so it proved.

Jimmy Neesham beat Brathwaite not once, but twice, before the latter pulled out to deep mid-wicket for two runs that took him past a century, his first at one-day international level. It is possible, but difficult, to imagine Brathwaite scoring a better ton in the remainder of his career, but the job was not done.

Another dot ball from Neesham saw the task become six runs required from seven balls. 

Would Brathwaite take the single to keep the strike, or would he go for glory? Unsurprisingly, he chose the second option. And as he swung hard and hit Neesham over mid-on, it looked like it was the right option. He did not middle it but a man that powerful can easily clear the boundary without doing so.

The Old Trafford crowd roared, expecting the ball to sail for six, while television viewers waited as the ball hung in the air and Boult, stationed on the deep mid-wicket boundary, came into view. And Boult did brilliantly, not only taking a fantastic overhead catch, but stopping himself from going over the boundary to give New Zealand a dramatic, thrilling five-run victory. Big celebrations in the outfield followed as a shattered Brathwaite slumped to his knees. 

If his shot had travelled an extra two metres, West Indies were victors, but Brathwaite and his men quite literally, just fell short. It is, after all, a fine line between pleasure and pain.

West Indies skipper Jason Holder had high praises for his charges despite coming out on the losing end of another ICC World Cup game maybe they should have won. 

West Indies all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite has been found guilty of breaching the International Cricket Council's code of conduct after showing dissent in Friday's defeat to England.

The all-rounder was given out caught behind off the bowling of Jofra Archer in the 44th over of West Indies' innings during the Cricket World Cup fixture in Southampton.

Brathwaite was clearly disappointed to be dismissed for 14 as his side were bowled out for 212, a total England easily overhauled with eight wickets and 101 deliveries to spare.

As well as an official reprimand, the 30-year-old received one demerit point for a level one breach. He accepted the sanction handed down by match referee David Boon, meaning a formal hearing was not required.

Players face suspension if they receive four or more demerit points within a two-year period.

West Indies are next in action in the tournament on Monday, as they take on Bangladesh at Taunton.

West Indies' pacers have shown sparks of the old Caribbean fire, but it needs to translate into more consistency, and wins for the team, before they can be truly compared to the greats of that era. 

West Indies blitzed their way to a 400-plus total against New Zealand in the last warm-up game before the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2019 gets under way, and the power in their batting was unreal. 

The name Carlos Brathwaite has come under scrutiny as a possible surprise pick for the Windies World Cup.

Windies T20 skipper Carlos Brathwaite has tipped the team to be a competitive force at the upcoming ICC World Cup if they are able to replicate the form shown in the recent England tour of the Caribbean.

After stunning the English to win the Test series 2-1, the Windies put in another solid shift to tie the One Day International (ODI) series 2-2.  The result was somewhat of a surprise against an England team, who are the world’s top-ranked team.

Brathwaite believes the performance will give the team a boost of confidence ahead of the tournament, which gets under way in May but has rejected any talk of the team being among the favourites.

"I think the chances are good but I don't think we will be favourites. And I don't think we will be underdogs," Brathwaite said.

"We know what we can do, especially after the series we just had against England. So, it's a balanced expectation in my opinion,” he added.

"The brand of cricket we played in the Caribbean if we can replicate that in England, we will go somewhere close to challenging for the title. We have been traditionally a good tournament team. So, hopefully, we can win the third World Cup."

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