CPL

Blackwood praised by Tallawahs CEO. "He was always ready."

By September 17, 2020

Jeff Miller has spoken highly of Jermaine Blackwood and sees him as part of the Jamaica Tallawahs squad in the next season of the Hero CPL.

Blackwood was a last-minute call up for the Jamaica Tallawahs after Andre McCarthy lost his place in the squad after he was exposed to someone infected with the Covid-19 virus. Nevertheless, while he did not necessarily cover himself in glory, the diminutive Jamaican batsman did just about enough to satisfy his employers.

In eight matches, Blackwood batted seven times scoring 189 runs at an average of 27.00. Critically, he became a useful replacement for an out of form Chadwick Walton and with the very reliable Glen Phillips, had the two best opening partnerships for the Tallawahs during the season.

He scored 74 while mounting an opening stand of 51 with Phillips against the Barbados Tridents. He also collaborated in an opening stand of 84 with Phillips against the St Lucia Zouks in a match that Tallawahs somehow managed to lose.

His contribution of 25 was more valuable than the actual score as it helped put his team in a winning position.

Miller was pleased with his overall performance.

“Jermaine contributing to the team when he got the opportunity only showed how professional he is,” Miller said.

“He was always ready, very vocal in the dressing room, a team player. Jermaine is a player that would definitely be a part of our T20 team going forward.”

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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