Bonner's ton helps put Scorpions out of Pride's reach at Conaree

By November 20, 2019

Nkrumah Bonner scored a quick-fire century that helped set the foundation for the Jamaica Scorpion’s 26-run victory over the Barbados Pride in a high-scoring match at Conaree on Wednesday.

Bonner scored 112 off just 114 balls and along with Rovman Powell who bludgeoned the Pride bowlers for 96 runs from just 55 balls, lay the foundation for the Scorpions’ 331 for 9 off their 50 overs.

Together they posted a fifth-wicket partnership of 151 which rescued Jamaica from 78 for 4 after 16.5 overs. The partnership ended at 229 for 5 when Powell was bowled by Shamar Springer.

His 96 included seven sixes and seven fours.

Just as important was the partnership of 60 between Bonner and Jamie Merchant that took Jamaica past the 300 mark. Bonner’s knock that included nine fours and three sixes finally ended when he lost his wicket to Chemar Holder.

Merchant, who scored a critical 38, featured in an unbroken 10th wicket stand of 22 that took Jamaica to what was ultimately a winning score.

Kyle Mayers, whose 2 for 26 helped root out Jamaica’s top order, was one of four Barbadian bowlers with two wickets. Holder finished with 2 for 56, Roshon Primus 2 for 81 and Shamar Springer 2 for 57 were also among the wickets.

Seeking 332 for victory, Barbados made a good fight of it.

Leniko Boucher (47) and Kjorn Ottley got Barbados off to a strong start with an opening stand of 64 at almost six runs an over.

Boucher departed mid-way the 11th over when he became the first of Merchant’s four victims. Two balls later Merchant dismissed Nicholas Kirton for nought and then Ottley for 26 to see Barbados in a spot of bother at 91 for 3 after 16.5 overs.

Johnathan Carter was the mainstay of the Pride’s middle-order featuring in partnerships of 27 with Ottley and 56 with Mayers who was dismissed by Merchant for 29.

Carter also shared in a partnership of 31 with Tevyn Walcott (5) and 49 with Shemar Springer who contributed 28.

Derval Green eventually bowled Carter for 97, a knock that included 10 fours and four sixes, but when he got out leaving Barbados at 227 for 6, the Pride were still more than 100 runs adrift with 9.3 overs remaining.

Primus’ cameo of 39 from 29 balls with three fours and a six, brought the Pride close but not close enough as they closed at 305 for 8.

Merchant finished with 4 for 35 while Andre McCarthy took 2 for 35.

 

   

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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