Australia coach Justin Langer believes his team must tour England if it is possible in 2020, as international cricket aims to get back on track after the impact of coronavirus.

After a four-month break, Test cricket resumed on Wednesday with a rain-hit first day of England's behind-closed-doors match against West Indies in Southampton.

Australia were due to tour England for a white-ball series starting on July 3, with new dates for the rescheduled trip yet to be confirmed.

With the Twenty20 World Cup still due to be played in Australia in October, Langer believes the tour of England also has to be a priority.

"I think we have to go to England. There's lots of challenges, of course, but we have to find solutions to make sure that can happen if possible," Langer told reporters.

"That's my view. I think for the health of world cricket.

"If things out of control happen and we can't end up going, at least we can say we've done everything in our power to make it happen."

Langer also claimed Cricket Australia (CA) should be willing to let its star names – such as Steve Smith – play in the Indian Premier League (IPL), with preparation for the T20 World Cup vital.

"I think we have to, talking frankly," said Langer, who would even let players leave if it meant them missing part of the domestic season in Australia.

"I'll always look for win-win situations and hopefully we do that when we get some clarity on what's happening with the schedule."

India will tour Australia later in 2020, with a four-Test series scheduled.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) says there is no evidence to merit launching an investigation into allegations that the 2011 Cricket World Cup final between India and Sri Lanka was fixed.

A criminal probe was launched in Sri Lanka following claims made by Mahindananda Aluthgamage, the country's sports minister at the time of a final won by India in Mumbai nine years ago.

Aluthgamage alleged that Sri Lanka had "sold" the World Cup, prompting a special investigation to be opened.

Kumar Sangakkara, Aravinda de Silva and Upul Tharanga were called in for questioning, but police this week dropped the probe. Mahela Jayawardene was due to be questioned but the investigation was dropped before he appeared.

The ICC on Friday said the governing body has not received any information to suggest there was any wrongdoing.

ICC anti-corruption code general manager Alex Marshall said: "The ICC Integrity Unit has looked into the recent allegations regarding the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup final 2011.

"At this time, we have not been presented with any evidence that supports the claims made or which would merit launching an investigation under the ICC anti-corruption code.

"There is no record of any letter regarding this matter sent by the then Sri Lanka sports minister to the ICC and senior ICC staff at the time have confirmed they have no recollection of receiving any such letter which would have led to an investigation.

"We have no reason to doubt the integrity of the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup final 2011.

"We take all allegations of this nature extremely seriously and should we receive any evidence to corroborate the claims, we will review our current position."

Australia's ODI series against Zimbabwe scheduled for August has been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Zimbabwe were due to play three ODIs in Australia later this year, but it has been postponed.

In a statement, Cricket Australia (CA) said it and Zimbabwe Cricket (ZC) had mutually agreed to the decision due to the short length of the series, significant biosecurity measures which would need to be in place and safety concerns.

"While we are disappointed to postpone the series, CA and ZC agree that in the best interest of players, match officials, volunteers as well as our fans, that this is the most practical and sensible decision," interim CA chief executive Nick Hockley said.

"We are committed to working with Zimbabwe Cricket on alternative dates to reschedule."

Acting ZC managing director Givemore Makoni said he was keen to see the series go ahead at another time.

"We were excited about facing Australia but, given the circumstances, deferring the tour was the only option," he said.

"We are, however, looking forward to the rescheduling of the series as soon as practically possible."

There have been more than 10.4 million confirmed cases of coronavirus worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 507,000.

Rory McIlroy and LeBron James produced memorable moments on June 19, a date that means much to England cricket fans but one their Australian counterparts will always want to forget.

McIlroy was magnificent as he won the 2011 U.S. Open, five years before James and the Cleveland Cavaliers completed a memorable triumph over the Golden State Warriors.

As for the Ashes rivals, England's batsmen were undoubtedly on top in 2018 as they put Australia's poor bowlers to the sword in Nottingham.

Take a look back at some of the memorable moments that have happened on this day through the years.

 

2011: Major breakthrough for McIlroy

Just over two months after enduring a last-round meltdown that ended his hopes of Masters glory at Augusta, McIlroy secured his first major - and in some style, too.

The Congressional course was no match for the Northern Irishman, who left the field fighting it out for second place - Jason Day would eventually finish a distant runner-up - and had the statisticians trawling through the records.

McIlroy's eight-shot triumph was the biggest margin of victory in the tournament's history, while his final score of 16 under was a record for strokes under par (a feat matched by Brooks Koepka in 2017). 

2016: Cavs stun Warriors to reign at last

Having returned for a second spell with Cleveland, the team that drafted him back in 2003, James finally steered the Cavs to glory in the NBA Finals.

The Golden State Warriors appeared on course to retain their title when they led the best-of-seven series 3-1. LeBron, however, had other ideas, inspiring his team to rally from the brink of defeat to claim the city's first professional sports title in 52 years.

His triple-double was influential in deciding the outcome of Game 7, though his most notable play was 'The Block' on Andre Iguodala late in proceedings. Yet it was Kyrie Irving who made the key shot with just under a minute remaining, sinking a three-pointer that helped clinch a 93-89 triumph.

2018: Australia suffer as England run up the score

Going, going gone. England's one-day team made history in the third match of the series against Australia, smashing their way to a world record total in the 50-over format.

Jonny Bairstow and Alex Hales both made centuries as the hosts amassed 481-6 at Trent Bridge. Captain Eoin Morgan weighed in with a rapid 67, helping England ease past their previous highest score of 444-3, made against Pakistan just under two years earlier at the same venue.

Australia could only muster 237 all out in reply to suffer their heaviest ever loss in ODI cricket in terms of runs (242 runs, to be precise). They would end up being swept in the series too, going down 5-0.

Cricket Australia (CA) has announced annual budget cuts of $40million Australian dollars while confirming it has made 40 redundancies due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

The governing body revealed it was making 14 per cent of its workforce redundant and Australia A tours would not take place this season as part of its cost-cutting measures.

CA has already released a packed home schedule for the international teams, while it also expects top-flight domestic cricket to be unaffected having announced the Big Bash League will run in its entirety.

"We recognise that this is a difficult time for Cricket Australia employees, particularly for those staff members affected by these redundancies and their families," CA chairman Earl Eddings said in a statement.

"However, our responsibility is clear: to navigate a path for cricket through this period of uncertainty and disruption to ensure we come out the other side sustainable in the short term and prosperous in the long term.

"Throughout COVID-19, the need to work closely with the cricket community and to move quickly as circumstances have changed has never been more important.

"With increasing clarity about the impact of COVID-19, we have managed the financial impact on our organisation, our people, our partners and players."

Eddings has also already said it appears "unrealistic" for the T20 World Cup to take place in Australia later this year as planned because of the COVID-19 crisis.

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) is determined to "deliver meaningful and long-term change" after acknowledging sport is "not immune" to systemic racism.

George Floyd's death while in police custody in Minneapolis last month led to protests in the United States and far beyond.

Former England batsman Michael Carberry this week stated that cricket is "rife with racism" and "black people are not important to the structure of English cricket".

James Anderson, England's leading Test wicket-taker, said the national team will have conversations about what they can do to make a stand and be more active in combating racism.

The ECB says it will listen and learn from the Black Lives Matter movement and will act in a bid to break down barriers.

"We have listened carefully to those who have spoken out in recent weeks about their experiences of being black in cricket, sport and society," the governing body said in a statement.

"We admire them for being vocal on this crucial topic. We know that systemic racism spans institutions and sectors across the country and we know that our sport is not immune.

"We truly believe that cricket is a game for everyone but understand that sadly, barriers to its enjoyment exist for many communities. We have made progress in bringing cricket to more and more people around the country and it is our resolve to break down barriers and reform our structures everywhere across the game.

"In recent weeks we have reflected, and acknowledge that black players and fans, who have contributed so much to the history of our game, now feel disenfranchised. They do not feel as if cricket is a game for them. This must change.

"That is why it's so important that we continue to listen to the voices of those who have spoken out, to educate ourselves and face uncomfortable truths in order to create action internally and throughout the game, to ensure long-term change.

"We will now work to engage community leaders and black influencers within cricket so that we can review and evolve our existing inclusion and diversity work and specifically address the issues raised by the black community.

"From there, it is our overall desire to create demonstrable action, in order to deliver meaningful and long-term change that permeates every layer of the game."

India have pulled out of tours to Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe because of fears over the coronavirus pandemic.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) released a statement on Friday confirming the team's withdrawal.

It comes after Sri Lanka Cricket had already announced the cancellation of the tour, which was set to include three ODIs and three Twenty20 matches.

India were scheduled to travel to Sri Lanka on June 24 and then to Zimbabwe for a three-match ODI series starting in August.

A BCCI statement added: "The BCCI is determined to take steps towards the resumption of international and domestic cricket, but it will not rush into any decision that will jeopardise the efforts put in by the central and state governments and several other respective agencies in containing the spread of the coronavirus.
 
"The office-bearers have been taking note of advisories issued by the government of India and the board is committed to fully comply with the restrictions imposed and guidelines issued. The BCCI will continue to study and evaluate the changing situation."

India have pulled out of a limited-overs tour of Sri Lanka that was due to begin this month.

The three ODIs and three Twenty20 matches that had been billed could now take place in August, according to reports.

Confirmation of the matches in June and July being called off came from Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC), with the national board citing coronavirus concerns as the reason.

An SLC statement read: "The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) informed Sri Lanka Cricket that due to the prevailing circumstances revolving around COVID-19 pandemic, the cricket series, which included three ODIs and three T20i matches will not be feasible."

SLC quoted a message it had received from the BCCI, confirming a wish to abide by cricket's future tours programme (FTP), provided health assurances have been received.

That BCCI message said it would need "to seek the advice from government of India and the health regulatory authorities before taking any decision for the resumption of cricket".

According to Sri Lankan newspaper The Island, India would be prepared to tour in August if they obtain governmental permission to make the trip.

Bangladesh are due to tour Sri Lanka in July and August for a three-Test series, but the Ceylon Daily News this week reported those matches were in doubt.

It quoted Bangladesh Cricket Board director Akram Khan as saying the "chances are very slim" of the tour going ahead in its current calendar slot.

The ICC has delayed a decision over the respective fates of the men's T20 World Cup and women's Cricket World Cup in order to continue exploring contingency plans over the next month.

Australia is due to host the men's T20 competition between October 18 and November 15 but the status of the tournament remains unclear due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, while the women's 50-over event is slated to take place in New Zealand from February 6 to March 7 next year.

Last month, the ICC denied reports a decision had been taken to move the T20 World Cup back to next year, although Cricket Australia said it was braced for the postponement.

Following an ICC Board meeting on Wednesday, the governing body said it will "continue to assess and evaluate the rapidly changing public health situation caused by COVID-19 working with key stakeholders including governments to explore how the events can be staged to protect the health and safety of everyone involved."

ICC chief executive Manu Sawhney said: "The situation surrounding the global pandemic is evolving rapidly and we want to give ourselves the best possible opportunity to make the right decision for the whole sport. 

"The health and well-being of everyone involved is our priority and other considerations fall out from that.

"We will only get one chance to make this decision and it needs to be the right one and as such we will continue to consult with our Members, broadcasters, partners, governments and players and to ensure that we make a well informed decision."

A wrist-spinner who bowled off-breaks, and turned his doosra by yards, he was impossible to fathom, physically and through measurement. He could touch his forearm with his little finger and rotate the metacarpals through a full 360 degrees.

For more than a dozen years Murali remained Sri Lanka’s ubiquitous match-winner, hauling up wickets by the buckets, 534 in One-Day Internationals. There were three World Cup finals along the way, the first in 1996 an epochal triumph for the island nation.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Muttiah Muralitharan

Born: April 17, 1972 (age 48), Kandy, Dominion of Ceylon

Height: 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm off-break

Playing Role: Bowler  

 

ODI Career: Sri Lanka (1993-2011)

Mat      Inns       Balls     Runs     Wkts      BBI      BBM       Ave      Econ     SR        4w    5w    10w

350        341       18811   12326     534       7/30     7/30       23.08     3.93     35.2      15      10       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Most One-Day International wickets (534)
  • Average of 23.08 in ODIs
  • Highest career peak ODI Bowling Rating by a spinner (913)
  • Second most World Cup scalps (67)

He mixed it up by bowling googlies and the quicker ones. On occasion, he even delivered the conventional off-break. This was interspersed with some stunning knocks such as the one against India in 2005 when he got to his hundred in 45 balls.

This lethal combination made him one of the most valuable players going around in the shorter forms of the game.

That big-hitting potential may have caused people, even ones with more trained eyes, to underscore just how good a bowler Shahid Afridi was. Only Chaminda Vaas has ever produced better figures in an ODI game, his 7-12 against the West Indies in 2013 routing the hosts in Providence, Guyana for 98. This was, of course, after Afridi had propped up a poor batting performance from Pakistan with a typically aggressive 76 from 55 deliveries. Pakistan won the game by 126 runs and Afridi was duly named man of the match.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Sahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi

Born: 1 March 1975 (age 45), Khyber, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Height: 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm leg spin

Playing role: All-rounder

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1996–2018)

Mat    Inns      Balls       Runs       Wkts     BBI     BBM    Ave    Econ    SR      4w    5w     10w

398     372       17670     13632       395       7/12    7/12    34.51  4.62    44.7     4        9         0

 

Career Highlights

  • 2nd player in ODI history with 6,000 runs and 300 wickets
  • Joint leading wicket-taker in 2011 World Cup (21)
  • Most wickets in any World Cup by a captain (21)
  • 3rd most wickets by a Pakistani in ODIs (395)

Saqlain Mushtaq is regarded as one of the best spinners cricket has ever seen.  His arsenal consisted of mean spin control and he was renowned for his ‘doosras’. In fact, he was one of the first off spinners to master the delivery that spins away from the batsman even though it is delivered with an offspinner's action.

Saqlain was not good enough with the bat, but his bowling abilities gave him a place in the Pakistan side for more than nine years.

His six five-wicket hauls and 11 four-fers tell the story of an aggressive bowler who was always trying to get a wicket. Sometimes he was criticized for that aggression, as his insistence on always varying his deliveries meant he was sometimes expensive. But that aggression also may have been the reason he was the quickest ODI bowler to 100 wickets but injuries and his inability to bat may have shortened his career somewhat.

Saqlain’s quality was on full show in 2000 when he laid waste to England in a six-wicket victory in Rawalpindi. The spinner’s variations were on song that day, as his 5-20, including the wickets of Marcus Trescothick and Graeme Hick, helped restrict England to 158 all-out. Pakistan cruised to 161-4 in 43.3 overs.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Saqlain Mushtaq

Born: December 29, 1976 (age 43), Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style:     Right-arm off-break

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1995-2003)

Mat      Inns      Balls     Runs     Wkts       BBI     BBM        Ave       Econ      SR     4w     5w   10w

169       165       8770     6275        288       5/20     5/20       21.78      4.29      30.4    11       6      0

 

Career Highlights

  • Claimed 288 wickets at 21.78
  • Joint best average of any bowler over 200 wickets
  • One of Wisden’s Cricketers of the Year (2000)
  • A 2003 Wisden statistical analysis said he was best ODI spinner
  • 1st spinner to take a hat-trick in ODIs

Tall and lithe in his build, Anil Kumble was not the quintessential, everyday spinner.

He produced no lateral magic from the surface as Shane Warne did, nor did he create ripples around the batsmen like the wily old fox, Muttiah Muralitharan. Yet he ended up with 339 ODI wickets, with the only spinners ahead of him being Muralitharan and Afridi.

In the process, he gained enormous goodwill amongst fans and his fellow teammates for being fiercely aggressive and competitive on the field, and unerringly composed and humble off it.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Anil Kumble

Born: 17 October 1970 (age 49), Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Legbreak googly

Playing role: Bowler

 

ODI Career: India (1990-2007)

Mat     Inns      Balls      Runs     Wkts    BBI      BBM       Ave       Econ     SR        4w  5w 10w

271       265       14496  10412  337       6/12       6/12     30.89   4.30      43.0      8     2     0

 

Career Highlights

  • Most successful bowler at the 1996 World Cup (15 wickets)
  • He picked up 337 wickets at an average of 30.89
  • He’s picked up 5 wickets in an innings, twice

Widely regarded as the greatest leg spinner in the history of cricket, Shane Warne was a renaissance man. He breathed new life into the bowling style of leg-spin which was dying and made it an integral part of the game.

His ball which bamboozled Mike Gatting in 1993, is regarded as the greatest delivery ever bowled by popular discretion.

He was the leading wicket-taker (708) in Test cricket, until December 2007, when the throne was usurped by another all-time spinning legend, Muttiah Muralitharan. Had he played as many ODIs as did other bowlers, the situation may have been the same, but his 293 from just 194 games, is testament to how dangerous he is. His average of just over 25 also makes him comparable to not just the greatest spinners in the ODI format, but the greatest bowlers, period.  

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Shane Keith Warne

Born: September 13, 1969 (age 50), Upper Ferntree Gully, Victoria, Australia

Height: 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm leg break

Playing role: Bowler

 

ODI Career: Australia (1993-2005)

Mat      Inns     Balls       Runs      Wkts      BBI        BBM      Ave        Econ        SR           4w          5w          10w

194       191      10642      7541        293      5/33       5/33      4.25        25.74      36.32          1             0              0

 

Career Highlights

  • Only specialist bowler among Wisden’s 5 Cricketers of the Century
  • He was named as a bowler in Australia's "greatest ever ODI team"
  • He’s picked up 293 wickets in 194 ODIs
  • Claimed one 5-wicket haul in ODIs

He began as a left-arm spinner but gradually established himself as more of an all-rounder in the Test arena. With his preference for good technique, his batting did not flourish in the ODI game, but he was still a useful lower-order, left-handed batsman with four half-centuries.

He was the youngest New Zealander to play One Day International cricket, just as was the case for Tests.

Gradually the drift became more pronounced; the spin and bounce more controlled and cannier. Today, Vettori is New Zealand's leading ODI wicket-taker.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Daniel Luca Vettori

Born: January 27, 1979 (age 41), Auckland, New Zealand

Height: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)

Batting style: Left-handed

Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

Playing role: Allrounder

 

ODI Career: New Zealand (1997-2015)

Mat      Inns      Balls     Runs     Wkts    BBI    BBM     Ave       Econ     SR      4w    5w    10w

295       277       14060    9674     305       5/7     5/7      31.71     4.12      46.0     8        2       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Took 305 wickets from 295 matches at 31.71
  • Most wickets by a Kiwi in ODIs
  • Eight 4-wicket hauls and two 5-wicket hauls in ODIs
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