Trevor Bayliss acknowledges England are boosted by Steve Smith's absence in the third Test but does not believe the Ashes will be decided by the performances of any one player.

Smith had been a thorn in England's side during his first three innings of the series - scoring 144, 142 and 92 - to help Australia hold a 1-0 lead.

But the batsman suffered a concussion from a Jofra Archer bouncer in the second Test and, having missed Australia's second innings of that match, he will not play at Headingley this week.

The news gives England renewed hope, yet Bayliss suggested Smith's absence does not guarantee success for his side.

"I suppose if you take out the best batter in the world, that's probably the case [that it is a boost]," he told a news conference.

"But his replacement [concussion substitute Marnus Labuschagne, who made 59] showed in the last match that he's more than capable.

"Win or lose, the winners of this Ashes are not going to go down necessarily to one player on either side. Yes, you've got your good players, ones who do well, but it's a team effort."

While Archer looks capable of being a match-winner for England, the hosts could also yet be boosted by the return of James Anderson.

The veteran Test great has been struggling with a calf issue and bowled just four overs in the first contest before missing the second match.

He was in action for Lancashire's second XI in a three-day friendly against Leicestershire on Tuesday, though, and took the first wicket of the match.

Justin Langer and Australia will not be drawn into an "emotional battle" to match Jofra Archer's pace by unleashing bouncers at the England batsmen.

Archer lit up the second Ashes Test with a ferocious display at Lord's, taking big wickets and notably delivering a ball that saw Steve Smith retire with a concussion.

The England star had struck Smith on the arm before hitting his neck, while he later sent a delivery straight into the face of concussion substitute Marnus Labuschagne.

But despite Archer's aggressive display, Australia head coach Langer is confident his side have a plan they will stick to that does not involve going tit for tat with the paceman.

"We know what our plans are to beat England," Langer told a news conference. "What we're not going to do is get caught up in an emotional battle of who is going to bowl the quickest bouncers.

"We're here to win the Test match, not to see how many helmets we can hit. That's the truth. We are literally here to win the Test match. We have our plans to beat England.

"Mike Atherton said a really interesting thing to me the other day in an interview: 'It seems a really different Australia team - in the past, you puff your chests out and you grow your beards and you're all tough and bowl as fast as you want'.

"No, we're here to win the Test match - not to see how many bruises we can give. That's not winning Test matches. Trust me, you can't get out with a bruise on your arm.

"We'll just keep continuing. We'll pick the team that we think will win.

"This is a different ground. I think the wicket will be quite slow, it's not going to be as fast as some of the other wickets we've seen - that's my understanding of what I've been told about playing here.

"I'm sure the bouncer will still be part of every bowler's armoury. If it helps us get batsmen out, then we'll use it. Otherwise, we'll keep sticking to the plan."

Ben Stokes has told Australia they should expect no respite from England fast bowler Jofra Archer when the third Ashes Test begins at Headingley on Thursday.

The visitors' star batsman Steve Smith will face tests to ascertain whether he can take part in Leeds, having worn a vicious bouncer from Archer at Lord's.

The delayed onset of concussion symptoms led to Smith having to sit out an absorbing final day – his replacement Marnus Labuschagne also copping some Archer punishment before helping to save a draw after Stokes' superb unbeaten 115 put England in command.

"It's part of the game and a big part of Jofra's game, being aggressive, not letting batsmen settle. That bouncer of his is a huge asset and he's going to keep on doing it," the all-rounder told reporters.

"When someone takes a nasty blow, no bowler is going to say, 'I'm not going to bowl that again because I don't want to hit them again'. The concern is always there when someone takes it. But next ball, when you get back to the mark, it's [a case of], 'I'm going to keep doing it'.

"We've seen Mitchell Johnson do it to us, especially in 2013-14, but Jofra just makes it look so easy, like he's walking in to bowl. And I'd rather have him on my team than have to face him. He's a frightening talent."

Jos Buttler was fielding at short leg when Smith was felled by the blow to his neck, making him first on the scene to check his opponent's wellbeing.

Along with Buttler, Archer and Stokes were also team-mates of Smith's with the Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League.

"We've got a good relationship from playing together and so does Jofra," Stokes said. "I messaged him [that evening] and had a little giggle with him, which was good, saying, 'Jofra's a good shot to hit that pea-head'. I think he was in as good fettle as he could have been.

"I was leg slip when it happened. It just hit flesh – not one of the nicest things to see on a cricket field. Someone going straight down like that was a pretty scary couple of minutes for everyone out there. It was great seeing him get back up."

Marnus Labuschagne just wanted to "get up and try to act cool" after being struck by a short ball from Jofra Archer on the final day of the second Test against England.

After replacing the sidelined Steve Smith in Australia's side, in the process becoming the first concussion substitute in Test history, Labuschagne endured a tough Ashes baptism as Australia attempted to bat out for a draw.

Coming in with the score at 19-2, the right-hander was unable to avoid his second delivery at the crease, a rapid bouncer from Archer crashing flush into the grille of the helmet.

The batsman quickly bounced back to his feet following the blow and was cleared by the team's medical staff to continue his innings. He went on to make 59, a pivotal contribution as the tourists survived to retain their slender 1-0 lead in the series.

Asked what he was thinking immediately after the impact, Labuschagne said: "You get up and try to act cool.

"It was then about trying to refocus and make sure you're watching the ball again - I was watching that one pretty closely!

"You just want to stay calm and answer the questions [from the medical staff] properly. I was like, 'I know where I am, I'm good. Get off the field!'. There's a process now, but there was no way I was going to get off that field.

"You want to stay in the contest. Getting to play at Lord's is a pretty great experience, so you just want to make sure you're ready, listen to their instructions and follow them - that's the key.

"If you have to come off, it's obviously because you're not alright. In my case, I was feeling fine. I just jumped the gun a bit on the questions. I knew how many I was on - 'I'm on zero and that was a fast bouncer'."

It was a similar delivery from Archer that hit Smith on day four. Australia's former captain retired hurt and, while able to return to the crease to continue his innings later in the session, he was ruled out of playing any further part in proceedings on the final morning due to delayed concussion.

Archer claimed five wickets in what was an impressive Test debut, as noted by Labuschagne.

"He bowled really well, at times his length was really good, and he obviously tested us with the short stuff on this up-and-down wicket," the 25-year-old said.

Despite not being able to bat in his side's second innings, Smith has climbed up to second in the updated International Cricket Council's Test rankings for batsmen and now trails leader Virat Kohli by just nine points.

Jofra Archer has shaken up the Ashes after living up to the hype on his Test debut, according to England captain Joe Root.

An intriguing finish to the second Test at Lord's was in store when England declared on 258-5 in the second session, setting Australia 267 to win or bat out the final 48 overs for a draw on Sunday.

It was the latter scenario which came to fruition as the tourists, missing Steve Smith because of the concussion he suffered following an Archer bouncer, batted out for a draw, meaning Tim Paine's side retained a 1-0 lead in the series.

However, in Archer – who returned match figures of 5-91 from a heavy workload of 44 overs – England have fresh optimism heading into the third Test at Headingley, with Smith's availability for an encounter that begins on Thursday in "serious doubt".

"He's come in and he really has made a massive impact, added a different dynamic to our bowling group," Root said at a news conference.

"I think [he] has given Australia something different to think about so it's really pleasing to see someone come in on Test debut and really shake up things and live up to the hype, even some of the hype that he put on himself.

"It's really pleasing to see and it makes for a very interesting last three games."

It was one of Archer's rockets that clattered into Smith's neck and knocked Australia's talisman down on Saturday.

Though Smith returned to complete his innings later that day, Australia announced on Sunday that he would play no further part at Lord's having shown concussion symptoms when he woke up.

Smith's concussion replacement in their XI, Marnus Labuschagne, then copped another vicious delivery on the helmet grille from Archer, who had sent back David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs.

Labuschagne survived that onslaught and went on to make a crucial 59, but Root feels Barbados-born seamer Archer can be instrumental as his side seek to retain the urn.

"He makes things happen when not many others in world cricket can," Root added.

"He's got such a unique action and way of bowling and natural pace which is always going to be in the game on any surface. When you've got that and the skill of the other guys around it, it makes for a tasty combination.

"It will make them think about what way they're going to combat how he's going to come at them.

"It's always nice when you're stood at slip and not batting against him. It's very different to the other options that we've had previously and have in this team, it's a different skill."

Australia captain Tim Paine lauded Marnus Labuschagne's commitment to the Ashes cause as Steve Smith's concussion replacement produced a gritty half-century in his side's draw with England.

Paine's team were set 267 to win inside 48 overs on the final day at Lord's after the hosts declared on 258-5 following a century from Ben Stokes (115 not out).

However, they were more concerned with batting out the day when Jofra Archer swiftly removed David Warner and Usman Khawaja to bring Labuschagne to the crease.

The 25-year-old was only thrust into the action as the first concussion substitute in Test history after Smith withdrew having been struck on the neck on Saturday by a bouncer from Archer, who then delivered a 91.6 miles-per-hour rocket that flew into Labuschagne's helmet grille and knocked him to the ground.

After receiving treatment on the field, Labuschagne went on to make a valuable 59, sharing an 85-run stand with Travis Head (42 not out) that took the game beyond England's reach – Australia eventually finishing with 154-6 to retain their 1-0 series lead.

"[It was] really pleasing for us to see him do that, particularly after the second ball he copped," Paine, speaking to Sky Sports, said of Labuschagne. 

"To get 150 kilometres per hour in the face and be able to stand up and play the way he did, for such a young player in Test cricket, was fantastic. Travis Head was the same."

Smith had returned to bat on Saturday following assessment from Australia's medical staff, yet it was confirmed on the final day that he would play no further part in the Test having displayed concussion symptoms in the morning.

Australia have said it is unlikely that their talismanic batsman will feature in the third Test, which begins at Headingley on Thursday.

"He's okay," Paine revealed.

"Obviously it was a really nasty knock. He felt okay yesterday and then, as concussions tend to be, [the symptoms were] delayed. He woke up, not feeling at his best today, so the decision was made to leave him out."

Asked whether he was happy that Smith was able to return on Saturday, Paine added: "I'm no doctor but we've got some professionals behind the scenes that make those decisions.

"Steve passed all his tests [on Saturday], was feeling okay. He deteriorated a little bit overnight, he retested, they weren't as good this morning so the medical professionals made that call.

"He will need to improve [to play at Headingley], there's no doubt about that, but hopefully for our sake he does improve in the next few days."

Australia overcame Steve Smith's absence and survived another venomous spell from Jofra Archer to draw the second Test with England and retain their slender advantage in the Ashes.

An intriguing, rain-affected encounter at Lord's concluded with neither side able to forge a positive result, despite England bidding to force the issue when declaring on 258-5 in the second session after Ben Stokes (115 not out) had posted a century.

Joe Root's attack had enough incentive with 48 overs remaining, while a target of 267 was also encouraging for the tourists, even if Smith was unavailable having displayed concussion symptoms on Sunday after copping an Archer bouncer on the third day.

Archer (3-32) dismissed David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs, but Smith's concussion replacement Marnus Labuschagne's gritty half-century effectively ended England's hopes, despite Jack Leach (3-37) striking with back-to-back deliveries and Joe Denly's brilliant catch, as Australia ended on 154-6.

Rain prevented play from starting for 70 minutes, Stokes and Jos Buttler (31) continuing their fifth-wicket stand in the first session to increase England's lead to 165.

Buttler top-edged Pat Cummins (3-35) to Josh Hazlewood at long leg after lunch before Stokes, then on 55, survived a review following an lbw appeal from Nathan Lyon.

Alongside Jonny Bairstow (30 not out), Stokes pushed on, dispatching Lyon over the ropes from successive deliveries as the advantage increased past 200.

A single to square leg gave Stokes his seventh Test century and Root called his batsmen in at the end of the following over to give Archer and his bowling colleagues an opportunity to level the series.

Archer provided early optimism when he snared Warner (5), who prodded to Rory Burns at gully to continue his dreadful Ashes, and then drew the edge of Khawaja (2), bringing Labuschagne, the first concussion substitute in Test history, to the crease.

There was no gentle introduction to Archer's searing speed as Labuschagne was caught flush on the helmet grille from his second delivery, a 91.6mph rocket that knocked him off his feet before he bolted back up.

Cameron Bancroft (16) was trapped in front by Leach but Labuschagne and Travis Head put on 85, with second slip Jason Roy shelling a chance to remove the latter when the alliance was worth 49.

Labuschagne (59) evntually fell in controversial circumstances, Root diving forward at midwicket to take a catch and benefitting from a soft signal of out when replays proved inconclusive.

As he walked off, the batsman expressed his disapproval to England's captain, whose team were soon celebrating again when Matthew Wade picked out short leg from Leach's next ball.

That gave the spinner three wickets - and Archer matched that total when Denly produced a fantastic one-handed catch to remove Tim Paine - but Head (42 not out) and Cummins (1 not out) ensured Australia held on.

Jofra Archer has acknowledged his heart "skipped a beat" after his short ball struck Steve Smith on the neck.

Smith was forced to retire hurt after Archer's fierce delivery hit him just below the helmet on day four of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

Australia's former captain later returned to the crease and was eventually dismissed for 92 as Australia posted 250 - eight shy of England's total. The hosts extended their lead to 104 with six wickets still in hand by the close of play on Saturday.

Archer, who clocked a top speed of 96.1mph during his Test debut, enjoyed a fine performance, taking 2-59 from 29 overs.

But the 24-year-old revealed his immediate concern over Smith's safety when he saw the Australian, who will take no further part in the second Test due to delayed concussion, go down.

"To see him go down, everyone stopped and everyone's heart skipped a beat," Archer told Test Match Special.

"After he got up he was moving around and you breathe a sigh of relief. No-one wants to see anyone getting carried off on a stretcher."

Archer also confirmed he was not attempting to hurt Smith - who has been the stand-out performer in the series so far - but rather stick to England's plan to get the Australian out.

"Honestly, I don't know what I was thinking [about Smith's injury]," Archer said in an interview with Sky Sports prior to the fifth day's play.

"You don't want to see anyone miss a day or another game, especially with what happened a few years ago [with the death of Phillip Hughes] as well. It's never a nice sight.

"I've never seen Smith get out of his own accord until yesterday, so I was just trying to rattle him.

"I was trying to get him out - I had a short leg and a leg slip and he was trying to work the ball off his hip, so if one bounces a bit more it should go to short leg, or one of the guys waiting.

"It's been like that a lot of the series really, a lot of balls haven't gone to hand, landing in the gap, so yesterday was just great seeing him get out without scoring 100."

Rain caused a delayed start to the final day of the second Ashes Test but England and Australia were set to resume their intriguing battle at Lord's prior to lunch.

Umpires Aleem Dar and Chris Gaffaney announced play would get under way at 1210 local time (1110 GMT) following an inspection.

The home side will resume on 96-4 in their second innings, meaning a lead of 104 runs. Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler will be back out in the middle, the pair having survived a tricky period of play late on day four to reach the close unbeaten on 16 and 10 respectively.

Yet it was the duel between England paceman Jofra Archer and Australia talisman Steve Smith that was the major talking point following Saturday's action at the home of cricket, the latter felled a bouncer and forced to retire hurt on 80.

The right-hander did return later in the innings, though, adding a further 12 runs before he was trapped lbw by Chris Woakes, the tourists eventually bowled out for 250 in reply to England's first-innings score of 258.

Australia lead the series 1-0 after a 251-run victory in the opener at Edgbaston.

Steve Smith suffered a major Ashes injury scare when he was struck on the neck by a 92.4mph short ball from Jofra Archer in a dramatic afternoon session at Lord's.

Australia's star batsman retired hurt on the advice of team medical staff before returning to action at the fall of the next wicket, as he chased a third successive century.

But Smith did not last long, advancing from 80 to 92 before being pinned lbw by Chris Woakes.

Australia were soon all out for 250, meaning England led by eight runs.

Smith was attempting to become just the fourth man to make three successive hundreds in one Ashes series, and the first since Arthur Morris for Australia in 1947.

He was back at the crease barely 45 minutes after taking the heavy blow, just below his left ear, that knocked him off his feet.

Archer's delivery had missed the protection provided by Smith's helmet and grille and left the 30-year-old in clear discomfort, although it was unclear whether he was disorientated once he got to his feet.

Despite having been applauded off the field, he faced boos from some spectators on his return to action, an apparently ignorant response to what had been a deeply worrying moment for both teams.

Cricket Australia explained Smith had been cleared to resume his innings, in a statement reported by Cricinfo that read: "Steve was hit on the neck below the left ear. He was assessed lying on the pitch at the instructions of team doctor Richard Saw.

"Dr Saw made the precautionary decision to remove Steve from the field of play to have him further assessed under Cricket Australia’s head impact protocol. Steve then passed his assessments and will now be monitored on an ongoing basis, as is routine."

Just minutes before his bouncer struck the Australia talisman, Archer had bowled a 96.1mph delivery at Smith, which he fended off. Smith was also struck by Archer in a previous over when the batsman was rapped on his left arm as he ducked for another bouncer from the Test debutant.

Smith made two centuries in Australia's emphatic victory in the first Test at Edgbaston but was out just before he reached three figures this time when Woakes broke through his defences. He sought a review, but his body language showed Smith was expecting to walk.

Archer had taken the only previous wicket to fall in the session when he had Australia captain Tim Paine caught, bat-pad, at short leg by Jos Buttler for 23.

Woakes had Peter Siddle caught behind by Jonny Bairstow, which led to Smith's return.

Smith hit three boundaries before England finally found a way to dismiss him for a double-figure score, with Nathan Lyon following later, lbw to Jack Leach, and Pat Cummins caught behind off Broad.

Former England skipper Michael Vaughan condemned the booing of Smith, saying on Twitter that his efforts had been worthy of an ovation.

Australia batsman Steve Smith retired hurt after being hit by a short ball from England's Jofra Archer in the second Ashes Test.

The former captain was 80 not out when he was caught by a 92.4mph delivery from Archer that struck him beneath his left ear, missing the protection provided by his helmet and grill.

Smith went down and looked to be in trouble, lying on his back in initial distress, with team medical staff appearing to instruct him to come off the pitch.

He got to his feet and there was no external sign of a major injury, but with concussion a possibility it was prudent of Smith – who had pulled Archer for four in the previous delivery – to take the advice of the medics.

The former captain was applauded off as he departed for further examination.

Just minutes earlier, Archer had bowled a 96.1mph delivery at Smith, which he managed to fend off.

Smith was also struck by Archer in a previous over when the batsman was rapped on the arm as he ducked for another bouncer from the England bowler, who is making his Test debut.

Smith made two centuries in Australia's emphatic victory in the first Test at Edgbaston.

Australia batsman Steve Smith retired hurt after being hit by a short ball from England's Jofra Archer in the second Ashes Test.

The former captain was 80 not out when he was caught by a 92.4mph delivery from Archer that struck him beneath his left ear, missing the protection provided by his helmet and grill.

Smith went down and looked to be in trouble, lying on his back in initial distress, with team medical staff appearing to instruct him to come off the pitch.

He got to his feet and there was no external sign of a major injury, but with concussion a possibility it was prudent of Smith – who had pulled Archer for four in the previous delivery – to take the advice of the medics.

The former captain was applauded off as he departed for further examination.

Just minutes earlier, Archer had bowled a 96.1mph delivery at Smith, which he managed to fend off.

Smith was also struck by Archer in a previous over when the batsman was rapped on the arm as he ducked for another bouncer from the England bowler, who is making his Test debut.

Smith made two centuries in Australia's emphatic victory in the first Test at Edgbaston.

Stuart Broad knows exactly what England must do to beat Australia in the second Ashes Test over the next two days - starting by bowling out the tourists before lunch on Saturday.

England, who were thrashed in the series opener at Edgbaston, recovered a foothold in the second match at Lord's on day three.

Debutant Jofra Archer collected his first Test wicket, while Broad improved his figures to 2-26 as Australia were reduced to 80-4, 178 runs behind in the first innings.

But with Wednesday's first day a washout and play halted just before lunch on Friday, with England in the ascendancy, Joe Root's men are running out of time to level the series in this match.

A draw appears the most likely result, yet Broad is confident he has a plan to defeat their rivals.

"We're pretty positive," he said. "We'd need to bowl Australia out by lunch but there are 98 overs for the next two days and, for both teams, that has been enough to bowl each other out so far.

"There could be an intriguing game left in this Test. So get the wickets by lunch, ideally bat until half an hour before lunch on day five, and then try to force a result that way."

Archer's dismissal of Cameron Bancroft was crucial on day three, and Broad believes the new boy still has much more to offer.

"I don't think Jofra bowled as quick as he can," Broad said. "He showed great control and bowled a nice nagging length.

"I don't think there's any doubt he has the attributes to be a Test cricketer. There are going to be times when he blows teams away.

"It's a big learning experience and he seems willing and keen to learn.

"In our minds, because he's been involved with the World Cup and talked about so much in the last six months, we think he's an experienced, older and knows-it-all cricketer.

"But he's still learning his trade a little bit, although he's doing it with great success."

No further play was possible due to rain after England hit back by taking three wickets in the morning session on day three of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

England went out under grey London skies on Friday needing to make inroads with Australia, 1-0 up after their victory at Edgbaston last week, 30-1 in reply to 258.

Cameron Bancroft became debutant Jofra Archer's first Test victim before Chris Woakes got rid of Usman Khawaja (36) and Stuart Broad (2-26) saw the back of Travis Head as three wickets tumbled for only 11 runs.

England failed to claim the prized scalp of former captain Steve Smith, but Australia were 80-4 - trailing by 178 - at lunch and poor weather prevented the players from taking to the field again on Friday.

A draw looks the most likely outcome after day one was washed out, but a more positive forecast for the weekend should ensure two extended days are not interrupted, giving both sides hope of forcing a win.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up Australia's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad were unable to conjure an early breakthrough.

England skipper Joe Root persisted with World Cup star Archer (1-18) and the quick got a much-needed maiden Test wicket with a delivery which struck Bancroft (13) in front after nipping in sharply off the seam.

Umpire's call was the verdict after Bancroft signalled for a review and Woakes (1-27) got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade was still there, although yet to get off the mark from 23 balls faced and Smith - scorer of a century in both innings in the first Test - was 13 not out when lunch was called with rain falling, and that was it for the day.

Rory Burns had no concerns about tackling Australia's pace attack and is backing England's bowlers, including Jofra Archer, to strike back against the tourists on day three.

Burns' 53 was crucial to England on day two of the second Ashes Test at Lord's, with the hosts stumbling to 258 all out.

Jonny Bairstow also scored a half-century before being caught by Usman Khawaja - who squandered a great chance to dismiss Burns earlier in the day.

England finished the day on a high, Stuart Broad dismissing David Warner as Australia managed to get to 30-1 at stumps.

Broad's fellow opening bowler Archer - on his England Test debut - wasted little time in getting stuck into Australia's order, delivering several bouncers as the light faded.

Australia's pacemen had shown a similar lack of mercy earlier in proceedings, with Burns receiving rough treatment, while Pat Cummins struck Chris Woakes on the helmet.

But England's opener had few issues with facing such fierce bowling.

"[Feeling] pretty good. It’s always nice to get in a scrap a little bit," Burns told a news conference.

"I got two in the same spot, which was nice. I got in amongst it and tried to tough it out.

"It's quite an obvious tactic of what they can do. The boys are preparing for it and in this game we can dish out some of our own again."

Asked if he believed Archer would be targeting Australia's batsmen with short deliveries, Burns added: "I'd have thought so. He copped a fair few so he's probably looking forward to getting his own back."

Australia spinner Nathan Lyon, who took three wickets, is not especially relishing facing Archer.

"Mate, I can't bat. What do you reckon?" Lyon joked when asked about the prospect in his news conference.

"Even though I can't bat, I'll give it a go. Unless you want to do it for me!"

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