Stuart Broad knows exactly what England must do to beat Australia in the second Ashes Test over the next two days - starting by bowling out the tourists before lunch on Saturday.

England, who were thrashed in the series opener at Edgbaston, recovered a foothold in the second match at Lord's on day three.

Debutant Jofra Archer collected his first Test wicket, while Broad improved his figures to 2-26 as Australia were reduced to 80-4, 178 runs behind in the first innings.

But with Wednesday's first day a washout and play halted just before lunch on Friday, with England in the ascendancy, Joe Root's men are running out of time to level the series in this match.

A draw appears the most likely result, yet Broad is confident he has a plan to defeat their rivals.

"We're pretty positive," he said. "We'd need to bowl Australia out by lunch but there are 98 overs for the next two days and, for both teams, that has been enough to bowl each other out so far.

"There could be an intriguing game left in this Test. So get the wickets by lunch, ideally bat until half an hour before lunch on day five, and then try to force a result that way."

Archer's dismissal of Cameron Bancroft was crucial on day three, and Broad believes the new boy still has much more to offer.

"I don't think Jofra bowled as quick as he can," Broad said. "He showed great control and bowled a nice nagging length.

"I don't think there's any doubt he has the attributes to be a Test cricketer. There are going to be times when he blows teams away.

"It's a big learning experience and he seems willing and keen to learn.

"In our minds, because he's been involved with the World Cup and talked about so much in the last six months, we think he's an experienced, older and knows-it-all cricketer.

"But he's still learning his trade a little bit, although he's doing it with great success."

No further play was possible due to rain after England hit back by taking three wickets in the morning session on day three of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

England went out under grey London skies on Friday needing to make inroads with Australia, 1-0 up after their victory at Edgbaston last week, 30-1 in reply to 258.

Cameron Bancroft became debutant Jofra Archer's first Test victim before Chris Woakes got rid of Usman Khawaja (36) and Stuart Broad (2-26) saw the back of Travis Head as three wickets tumbled for only 11 runs.

England failed to claim the prized scalp of former captain Steve Smith, but Australia were 80-4 - trailing by 178 - at lunch and poor weather prevented the players from taking to the field again on Friday.

A draw looks the most likely outcome after day one was washed out, but a more positive forecast for the weekend should ensure two extended days are not interrupted, giving both sides hope of forcing a win.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up Australia's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad were unable to conjure an early breakthrough.

England skipper Joe Root persisted with World Cup star Archer (1-18) and the quick got a much-needed maiden Test wicket with a delivery which struck Bancroft (13) in front after nipping in sharply off the seam.

Umpire's call was the verdict after Bancroft signalled for a review and Woakes (1-27) got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade was still there, although yet to get off the mark from 23 balls faced and Smith - scorer of a century in both innings in the first Test - was 13 not out when lunch was called with rain falling, and that was it for the day.

Jofra Archer claimed his first Test wicket.as England struck three times in the morning session of what was forecast to be a rain-hit third day against Australia at Lord's.

The tourists dominated Thursday's play in the second Ashes Test as they targeted a 2-0 series lead, bowling England out for only 258 and closing on 30-1.

With wet weather expected for the rest of Friday, Joe Root's home side needed to do damage before lunch and duly reduced Australia to 80-4 at the interval.

Debutant Archer removed Cameron Bancroft before Chris Woakes saw off Usman Khawaja (38) and Travis Head fell to Stuart Broad, but England were unable to claim the prized scalp of Steve Smith (13 not), who scored a century in both innings in Australia's win at Edgbaston.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up the team's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad struggled early on.

Root persisted with World Cup star Archer and the quick got a much-needed breakthrough with a delivery which struck Bancroft in front after nipping in sharply off the seam, umpire's call the verdict after the opener signalled for a review.

Woakes got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away from the left-hander.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade, full of confidence after scoring a hundred in the first Test, was still there along with Smith when lunch was called with rain falling and a strong prospect there may not be any further play on Friday.

Australia consolidated their commanding early position in the Ashes by dismissing England for 258 on day two of the second Test at Lord's.

Following a first-day washout, visiting captain Tim Paine won the toss and inserted England, with the frailties exposed in their 251-run defeat at Edgbaston again evident in the face of some supremely disciplined Australian bowling.

The tourists' attack was spearheaded by Josh Hazlewood (3-58), who missed out in Birmingham but set the tone with a high-class opening burst that accounted for Jason Roy and England captain Joe Root.

Pat Cummins (3-61) executed a short-pitched ploy impressively on a surface that showed a few signs of being two-paced, while England's first-Test tormentor Nathan Lyon (3-68) found turn to claim three scalps, including dismissing Ben Stokes for 13.

Half-centuries from Rory Burns (53) and Jonny Bairstow (52) gave England something vaguely useful to bowl at.

Stuart Broad dismissed David Warner for the third time in the series – a personal battle unquestionably going in England's favour. Nevertheless, as Australia closed on 30-1, the overall tide still felt some way from turning.

Paine's decision at the toss raised some eyebrows but Hazlewood was straight into his work, persuading Roy to fend into the slips with no runs on the board.

Root threaded two immaculate cover drives to the fence but was trapped plumb in front – Burns telling his skipper there was no point wasting a review.

Joe Denly and Burns saw England through to lunch at 76-2 before the former became Hazlewood's third victim for 30, edging a teasing delivery through to wicketkeeper Paine.

As was the case while making his maiden Test century at Edgbaston, Burns rode his luck at times and was put down by Usman Khawaja, but a sensational grab at short leg by Cameron Bancroft off Cummins ensured he would not cash in to the same extent.

That brought Jos Buttler and Stokes together, yet England's heroes on this ground a month ago in the Cricket World Cup final were denied the chance to produce similar heroics by Peter Siddle (1-48) and Lyon respectively.

Not for the first time of late, Chris Woakes came to the crease and batted with far more assurance than the specialists above him – adding 72 with Bairstow for the seventh wicket.

But Cummins struck the Warwickshire all-rounder with a painful blow to the helmet and he gloved the same bowler behind to bring in the tail.

Broad and Jofra Archer made breezy cameos alongside Bairstow, who was caught by Khawaja in the deep off Lyon to be the last man out, and the England pacemen set about the Australia top order.

Archer got the Lord's crowd going on his much-anticipated debut in the longest format and Broad brought one back through the gate to have more fun at Warner's expense. However, Bancroft just about survived to finish the day on five not out alongside Khawaja, who was unbeaten on 18 at stumps.

Steve Smith's sublime innings showed England that big runs can be scored in the opening Ashes Test, according to Stuart Broad.

On his first Test appearance since being banned following his role in the ball-tampering scandal, Smith put on a masterful display at Edgbaston, hitting 144 from 219 delivers to rescue the visitors after they slumped to 122-8.

Broad, who brought up his 100th Ashes wicket by dismissing Smith late on, starred for England with the ball after fellow paceman Jimmy Anderson had succumbed to injury.

With England set a target of 284, Rory Burns and Jason Roy batted out the last two overs of play for 10 to leave the match finely poised heading into day two.

And though Broad recognised the damage Smith's knock had done to England's hopes, he also felt it should provide inspiration as they look to build a total in Birmingham. 

"He's played beautifully. He's always been awkward to bowl at," he said.

"But I think we bowled really well at him up until tea. I think he then took advantage of the ball being a bit softer.

"Virat Kohli did similar to us last year, getting 149 out of a lowish total.

"There's no real positives out of Smith getting 144 on the first day of the series, but it shows if we apply ourselves then runs can be scored on there, particularly if you get in.

"It's a tricky pitch to start but if someone goes and gets to 30 we can capitalise."

Broad also understands England must prevent Smith from inflicting similar pain across the series if they are to stand a chance of regaining the urn.

"It seemed like he was really fidgety today and getting a bit frustrated at himself for not hitting a four," he added.

"But maybe that's because I haven't played against him in 18 months and I forgot how much he moves around.

"He's got a fantastic record, so you have to make those first 20 balls count. He's arguably the best batter in the world at batting with a tail, so for us to win this Ashes series we're going to have to get him out early."

Stuart Broad is hoping for good news as England await an update on the full extent of the injury suffered by James Anderson during the first Ashes Test. 

England's leading Test wicket-taker Anderson had been deemed fit to start the series opener after suffering with a calf problem in recent weeks, but an issue with the same muscle saw him limited to just four overs on Thursday.

Broad, who picked up the slack with a superb five-for, revealed the veteran apologised for his inability to aid the cause.

But England are optimistic that a test on the "tight" calf would return positive results.

"[Anderson] went off straight after his spell but didn't say anything and came out back to field. We don't know the full extent yet," said Broad, in quotes reported by BBC Sport.

"He is a bit quiet and came up to the bowlers and said sorry but there is nothing to be sorry about. He is a bit quiet and bit frustrated.

"All we can hope is the news is better than we expect."

Figures of 5-86 included Broad's 100th Ashes wicket, removing the resolute Steve Smith after an outstanding 144 to close the Australia innings.

Having seen the tourists recover from 122-8 to 284 all out, Broad acknowledged he had forgotten quite how exacting such rollercoaster contests can be in one of sport's greatest rivalries.

"I feel quite exhausted," he said. "I think that comes with the emotion of the first day of an Ashes series.

"You forget how emotionally draining these series can be and we went down to a three-man seam attack, which upped the overs.

"Smith played a wonderful knock, but anytime you bowl them out for under 300 on the first day of a Test match, we're pretty happy.

"It looks like there's runs out there if someone gets in, so we should take encouragement from the way he played.

"Australia threw it back at us after tea and I'd expect that throughout the series."

Steve Smith scored arguably the finest century of his Test career to rescue Australia from the brink of collapse in the first Ashes Test against England side facing an anxious wait to learn the extent of an injury to James Anderson.

Having won the toss and opted to bat, Australia twice looked in deep trouble despite England only being able to get four overs out of leading Test wicket-taker Anderson, who was sent for a scan due to "tightness" in his calf.

Australia were reduced to 35-3 and then 122-8, but on each occasion former captain Smith performed a rebuilding job and was rewarded for anchoring the innings with a hundred on his first Test appearance since serving a 12-month ban.

He thrived amid the predictable boos that greeted him, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft following their suspensions for ball tampering in the South Africa series last year and, having successfully reviewed an lbw decision on 34, racked up 144 to guide Australia to 284 before Stuart Broad bowled him to claim his fifth wicket and 100th in Ashes cricket.

England survived two overs without loss before the close, reaching stumps on 10-0.

Australia won the toss and opted to bat, a decision that looked questionable as the first three wickets fell in short order. Warner, having been incorrectly given not out caught behind, went in the fourth over lbw to Broad.

HawkEye showed the ball would have missed the stumps, setting the tone for a day when umpire errors were commonplace, before Bancroft edged the same man to first slip.

England successfully reviewed and had Usman Khawaja caught behind for 13, but Smith – in a stand of 64 with Travis Head – mounted his first recovery effort of the day as Australia reached lunch without further damage.

Chris Woakes trapped Head in front in the sixth over after the restart, with an aghast Smith correctly given a reprieve in the following over after initially being ruled out not playing a shot.

Another successful review saw Matthew Wade fall to Woakes lbw before captain Tim Paine and James Pattinson went in the space of three balls to Broad. Paine played a dreadful pull shot and Pattinson's exit came with another incorrect lbw decision.

A sub-200 total looked on the cards but Smith, aided by a battling 44 from Peter Siddle, managed the situation brilliantly, farming the strike and peppering the boundary as the depleted England attack tired.

Siddle, who put on 88 with Smith, fell to Moeen Ali but the ex-skipper added another 74 with Lyon, an innings that comprised 16 fours and two sixes eventually ended by a visibly frustrated Broad before Rory Burns and Jason Roy staved off 12 balls.

Stuart Broad made Ashes history in the first Test at Edgbaston as he took a five-for to reach 100 wickets in the famous series.

The England seamer was the star of the show for the hosts on the opening day in Birmingham as Australia were bowled out for 284.

Broad dismissed Cameron Bancroft, David Warner, Tim Paine and James Pattinson as Australia slumped to 122-8, but his search for the fifth wicket that would mark an Ashes milestone proved a frustrating one.

Steve Smith scored a magnificent 144 and anchored stands of 88 and 74 with tailenders Peter Siddle and Nathan Lyon to help Australia recover from a precarious position, before he was finally bowled by Broad as the irritated England seamer brought up a century he did not celebrate.

Stuart Broad made Ashes history in the first Test at Edgbaston as he took a five-for to reach 100 wickets in the famous series.

The England seamer was the star of the show for the hosts on the opening day in Birmingham as Australia were bowled out for 284.

Broad dismissed Cameron Bancroft, David Warner, Tim Paine and James Pattinson as Australia slumped to 122-8, but his search for the fifth wicket that would mark an Ashes milestone proved a frustrating one.

Steve Smith scored a magnificent 144 and anchored stands of 88 and 74 with tailenders Peter Siddle and Nathan Lyon to help Australia recover from a precarious position, before he was finally bowled by Broad as the irritated England seamer brought up a century he did not celebrate.

Stuart Broad and Chris Woakes put England in control of the first Ashes Test at Edgbaston as Australia collapsed to 154-8 in the second session of a day marked by unimpressive umpiring.

The tourists mounted something of a recovery after being reduced to 35-3 to reach 83-3 at lunch.

Australia added another 16 to that total before Travis Head (35) departed in the sixth over of the afternoon session, trapped in front by one that straightened from Woakes (3-35).

That wicket prompted a collapse in line with pre-series talk of both teams being short in the batting department, England's attack prospering even after James Anderson went for a scan on a tight calf.

However, England were denied the prized wicket of Steve Smith (66 not out), who successfully reviewed after being given out lbw not playing a shot.

Matthew Wade (1) departed in the next over when he was struck on the pad by Woakes and England correctly reviewed.

Captain Tim Paine (5) made a dreadful mistake as he pulled Broad (4-38) to Rory Burns at deep square leg, with James Pattinson following him for a duck two balls later, dismissed lbw before replays showed he should have survived

There was no debate when Pat Cummins (5) fell to Ben Stokes (1-44) via the same mode of dismissal as England ploughed into the Australia tail, although Peter Siddle (7 not out) provided more pain for the umpires as he rightly reviewed after edging on to his pads.

Smith reached his fifty in 119 balls at the end of the same over, he and Siddle surviving until tea with rain in the air in Birmingham.

 

Stuart Broad claimed two wickets before Australia recovered from a shaky start to reach 83-3 on the first morning of the Ashes.

Touring captain Tim Paine won the toss and opted to bat in the opening Test at Edgbaston, but his side were soon in trouble as the vastly experienced new-ball pairing of Broad and James Anderson started superbly, extracting seam movement to regularly beat the bat.

Broad, bowling notably fuller and posing a continued threat, removed openers David Warner and Cameron Bancroft for two and eight respectively in a superb first spell.

Australia also lost Usman Khawaja to Chris Woakes prior to lunch, but Steve Smith (23 not out) held firm in his first Test innings since he was suspended for his role in last year's ball-tampering scandal and Travis Head provided some much-needed impetus in reaching 26 not out.

Anderson - a fitness doubt ahead of this match - did not bowl again in the morning after an opening four-over burst that yielded figures of 0-1. He briefly left the field after that spell, although it was not clear whether his lack of overs prior to lunch was due to an injury scare or cautious management of the 37-year-old's workload.

Warner's brief innings was certainly not short of incident. Firstly, he was given a life on one when an edge down the leg side off Broad went unnoticed and England failed to call for a review.

In Broad's next over, England wasted a review after umpire Aleem Dar correctly turned down an lbw appeal. Broad did trap Warner in front four balls later, but replays showed the full-pitched delivery would have missed leg stump, meaning the batsman should have sent the decision upstairs.

Warner's dismissal was predictably greeted with jubilation by sandpaper-waving fans eager to remind the opener of his Cape Town ball-tampering shame.

Bancroft, representing Australia for the first time since that saga, soon became a second victim for Broad, edging to Joe Root at first slip having been squared up by one that left him.

A successful review from England then accounted for Khawaja, who got the faintest of edges to a Woakes delivery.

However, Smith would not be shifted and Head, after beginning his innings with 15 dot balls, scored freely to lift the pressure on Australia, who opted to leave out Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood on a day when showers were forecast in the afternoon.

Forget about the Cricket World Cup – that is old news. England may have prevailed (thanks to the boundary count) on home soil to be crowned champions, but there is little time to bask in the glory.

Just over two weeks after that unforgettable final against New Zealand, the focus switches to Test action and the small matter of the Ashes.

Australia are holders of the urn following their 4-0 success on home soil in 2017-18. However, they have not triumphed on English soil since 2001, when a star-studded side led by Steve Waugh and including Adam Gilchrist, Glenn McGrath, Ricky Ponting and Shane Warne proved to be far too strong for Nasser Hussain's team.

Since then, though, England have dominated in their own backyard. Can they continue their dominance, or will an away team succeed for the first time since 2010-11?

Ahead of the 2019 edition of the series, three Omnisport journalists have offered predictions for what might unfold in the coming weeks.

 

LIAM BLACKBURN

Winner and score: England (3-2)

You would be a brave man to bet against Joe Root's team in their own conditions given England have not lost a Test series at home since 2014 – when Sri Lanka edged a two-match contest. The Australian aura was gone after 2005 and this is an England team largely made up of players still residing on cloud nine after the thrilling World Cup triumph. England are not infallible – see that fragile top order for evidence – but, conversely, there should be little to fear from an Australia side that has been bowled out for less than 300 on 15 occasions in their previous 12 Tests.

Leading run-scorer: Steve Smith

In eight of those 12 Tests, Australia were without Cameron Bancroft, David Warner and Smith due to their suspensions following the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa. It is Smith – a man who was still top of the ICC's Test batting rankings during part of his ban – who England will fear the most. He scored the most runs (508) four years ago in England, was also the leading run-scorer (687) in the most recent Ashes in Australia and registered four half-centuries in the World Cup to suggest he has not lost his touch.

Leading wicket-taker: James Anderson

This may be his last Ashes hurrah but Anderson, who should overcome a calf problem to feature at Edgbaston, can bow out with a bang. Ignore the 36-year-old's recent figures on flatter tracks in Sri Lanka and the Caribbean – when he took 11 wickets across five Tests – and instead focus on the most recent home series against India, Pakistan and West Indies, in conditions tailor-made for the seamer. Anderson was England's leading wicket-taker in each of the three series and in this Ashes, he will be handed his weapon of choice – the Dukes ball with a bigger seam that saw him do such damage in 2017 and 2018.

 

ROB LANCASTER

Winner and score: Draw (2-2 - Australia retain the Ashes)

Lunch. Tea. Rain stopping play. Top-order collapses. They are about the only certainties heading into this Ashes series, along with Bancroft, Smith and Warner being greeted by boos each time they come out to bat. Both teams have a conveyor belt of pace bowlers but serious holes in their batting line-ups. Whoever can work out the best options to plug those gaps may well end up being victorious. With that in mind, it may finally be time for the home dominance to come to an end. Australia have selected a well-balanced squad and the return of the ball-tampering trio to the Test XI gives it a much stronger look. Crucially, too, England's World Cup success may have emptied the tanks of some key players, including skipper Root. With rain to play a part somewhere, the prediction is two wins apiece (both for Australia at the London venues) and a weather-hit draw somewhere outside the capital.

Leading run-scorer: Steve Smith

It is hard to see how anyone regularly coming up against the new ball will prosper on a regular basis. England have shown a propensity to fold faster than an origami expert (see Ireland, one-off Test, Lord's) and still appear no closer to working out their best combination for the top three. Root is seemingly not keen on a promotion from four in the order, but he will be a target for the Australia attack however early he is out in the middle. Smith will be in the firing line too, considering what happened in Cape Town last year. However, the right-hander averaged a ridiculous 137.4 in the last Ashes and will be determined to succeed after serving a suspension.

Leading wicket-taker: Stuart Broad

Poor Broad. He is second on England's list for Test wickets and just warmed up for the Ashes with seven in the match against Ireland at Lord's, yet some appear ready to cast him out on the international scrap heap. Anderson remains the leader of the attack but he is coming back from a calf injury, and the hot-and-cold Broad has a habit of catching fire against the Australians. He may struggle to match his career-best haul of 8-15 achieved at Trent Bridge in the 2015 series, but the 33-year-old still has a few of those devastating spells in him. It is far tougher to pick a candidate for this award for the tourists outside of Nathan Lyon, considering he may be the only bowler who features in every game while they manage the workload of the pacemen.

 

DEJAN KALINIC

Winner and score: Australia (3-2)

The weather in England will obviously have an impact, but given both teams' batting woes, results still seem likely. Australia last won an Ashes series in England in 2001, but this is a fine opportunity to end that drought. The hosts' World Cup win took plenty out of them, and signs of fatigue are sure to be present during the series, giving Australia's bowlers in particular something to take advantage of. With Warner and Smith having a point to prove in the Test arena after their bans and plenty of depth in the bowling attack, Australia have what they need to get the job done. There will surely be little between the teams so if the tourists' stars can step up in the right moments, the urn is likely to be theirs at the Oval.

Leading run-scorer: David Warner

What better way to drown out the boos than making plenty of runs? Warner is exactly the type to thrive off that kind of attention and he showed during the World Cup his form was quite good, making 647 runs at an average of 71.88, with three centuries. He also made a 58 in the intra-squad tour match, an encounter for the most part best forgotten by Australia's batsmen. If Australia are to have any chance of an upset win on English soil, Warner will need to deliver. The left-hander managed 418 runs at 46.44 during the 2015 Ashes, and that was without going on to convert one of his five half-centuries. And, in the wake of the ball-tampering scandal, what better way to endear yourself once again to an at-best uncertain Australian public?

Leading wicket-taker: Pat Cummins

The 2019 Allan Border Medallist and the number one Test bowler in the world. Is Cummins getting the credit he deserves yet? Finally fit, Cummins has been a standout in recent times for Australia, and he gets a chance to terrorise England once more. It may have been on home soil, but the paceman took a series-high 23 wickets in 2017-18. Cummins – also handy with the bat, which may become incredibly important – was only a late inclusion into the squad in 2015, but he returns four years later as a vital part of Australia's bowling attack and with a chance to show just why he is the world's top-ranked Test bowler.

England seamers Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad tore through Ireland at Lord's on Friday to end a remarkable Test match where seam bowlers dominated.

Needing 182 for a historic maiden victory in cricket's longest format, Ireland were blown away as they subsided to 38 all out.

It meant England escaped with a remarkable win despite also failing to reach three figures in their first innings and needing nightwatchman Jack Leach to produce their most substantial batting contribution.

Whether it made for useful Ashes preparation is up for debate, but a Test played out in fast forward unquestionably made for compelling viewing.

 

A win without foundation

Before lunch was served on the first day, England's hopes of victory were in tatters. Playing on his home ground, Middlesex veteran Tim Murtagh earned himself a place on the fabled honours board with an imperious 5-13.

England's collapse to 85 all out was their lowest at home since Glenn McGrath's stunning 8-38 dismissed them for 77 at Lord's in 1997.

They escaped with a draw on that occasion and this win marks only the 13th time in Test history – and fifth since 1935 – that a team has managed to claim victory despite being dismissed for below 100 in their first innings.

Jack of all trades

Selected for his dependable left-arm spin, Jack Leach walked away with the man-of-the-match award after a diligently compiled 92 in the second innings gave some of his much-vaunted England colleagues a lesson in application at the crease.

Indeed, Leach's total was more than the 87 skipper Joe Root, Rory Burns, Joe Denly, Moeen Ali and the pair-bagging Jonny Bairstow could manage between them in the match. It was also only the second fifty in 2019 for an England Test opener.

England's out-of-sorts batsmen might be encouraged by Leach demonstrating how form can turn around at an unexpected moment. The highest score of his first-class career came after 19 innings without reaching double digits.

Wondrous Woakes loving Lord's 

Some observers believe two Tests every year at Lord's gives English cricket's HQ an unfair slice of the pie but, if Chris Woakes had his way, England would probably never play anywhere else.

The Warwickshire all-rounder put a lacklustre first-innings outing behind him to demolish Ireland with a masterful display of seam and swing. Woakes' eventual figures of 6-17 mean he has 24 Lord's wickets at an average of 9.75 – the third best of any seamer at a single venue.

For context, the 30-year-old's overall Test analysis is 78 wickets at 31.06. All three of his five-wicket hauls - along with one tally of 10 in a match - have come at Lord's, where he scored his maiden and so-far only Test century against India last August.

Irish dreams shattered

When captain Will Porterfield and James McCollum emerged to start the Ireland chase, victory and history appeared within reach.

But 15.4 brutal overs later it was all over. McCollum was the only visiting batsman to reach double figures second time around as Ireland posted the seventh-worst score in Test history and the lowest ever at Lord's.

Joe Root felt England gave a timely demonstration of their calm under pressure after blowing Ireland away at Lord's on Friday.

Set 182 for a historic maiden Test victory, the visitors crumbled to 38 all out – Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad sharing all 10 wickets in a masterful demonstration of seam and swing in helpful conditions.

It meant England's blushes were spared after a dismal 85 all out on the first morning left them staring at a humiliating defeat.

"I know that that was a lot of runs on this surface," Root said at the post-match presentation, before alluding to last year's dramatic win over India in similar circumstance at Edgbaston – the venue for next week's first Ashes Test against Australia.

"We've been in this position before, we found ourselves in a similar position at Edgbaston last year so we knew that we'd been able to manage a similar sort of scenario.

"I think it was important that we stayed calm, in control of what we wanted to do and asked the right questions - and that's exactly what we did."

Woakes' Test-best figures of 6-17 extended his phenomenal record at Lord's, while Broad's 4-19 wrought further torment upon the overmatched Ireland batting order.

"Both me and Woakesy would roll these conditions up today and take them everywhere with us," Broad told BBC Sport. "You fancy defending anything in these conditions.

"The biggest part of this match was us picking up 10 wickets on day one because if Ireland had got a huge lead that would have been it.

"A lot has happened in two and a half days!"

Ireland captain Will Porterfield called on his Test rookies to take lessons from an ultimately bruising experience that promised so much.

"It all happened pretty quickly - they exploited the overcast conditions," he said.

"All the dismissals were lbw, bowled or caught by slip or keeper - the exact dismissals a bowling side is looking for on that pitch in these conditions.

"It's a big learning curve for the lads."

Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad ripped through Ireland at Lord's to spare England from a humiliating Test defeat on the eve of the Ashes.

Woakes continued his superb record on the ground with 6-17 as the visitors were bundled out for a paltry 38 – the seventh-lowest completed innings score in Test history – and England won by 143 runs, despite collapsing to 85 all out themselves on the first morning.

The Warwickshire all-rounder now has three five-wicket hauls at Lord's, with 24 scalps overall at 9.75 at English cricket's HQ and his Friday spell served as a timely re-stating of his Ashes credentials, following a lacklustre first-innings outing.

Broad chipped in with 4-19 before Woakes uprooted Tim Murtagh's leg stump to wrap up a torturous 15.4 overs for Ireland on a day that had promised so much for the Test rookies.

Murtagh's mastery of helpful bowling conditions on day one put a first victory in the longest format at the third time of asking on the cards for Will Porterfield's side, and that remained the case when Stuart Thompson (3-44) bowled Olly Stone with the first ball of day three.

It meant England were 303 all out and the ultimately unchallenged victory target was 182.

The opening stand of 11 between Porterfield and James McCollum was Ireland's biggest, with a sharp catch behind from Jonny Bairstow off Woakes dismissing the captain to start the procession.

Porterfield's opposite number Joe Root claimed four slip catches, helping Broad see off first-innings half-centurion Andy Balbirnie and Woakes to dismiss McCollum – the only Irishman to reach double figures second time around.

McCollum's wicket was the first of three to go with the score on 24, as Broad pinned Kevin O'Brien plumb in front and Woakes successfully reviewed an lbw appeal against Gary Wilson.

By that time the dangerous Paul Stirling had departed bowled without scoring – his decision to aim a booming drive at Woakes a particularly foolhardy stroke in a match packed with them.

The tail offered scant resistance, with Woakes and Broad's brilliance bailing out their under-par batting colleagues and allowing England to head into their latest duel against Australia with blushes spared.

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