Durham have announced the signing of Australia international Peter Handscomb for the remainder of the English domestic season.

The wicketkeeper-batsman - who has represented his country in all three formats - missed out on selection for the Ashes squad but will now remain in England.

Handscomb fills the overseas spot at Durham vacated by compatriot Cameron Bancroft, who was picked in Australia's 17-man party for the five-Test series.

"We are delighted to welcome Peter to Durham for the rest of the season," Marcus North, director of cricket at Durham, said.

"Peter is a well-known player across all formats of the game, so it is a great to be welcoming him to Chester-le-Street.

"He has proven he can score runs having excelled for Victoria in their domestic competition, so we are pleased to have him joining us at Durham."

Jason Roy spearheaded a superb all-round England display in a crushing eight-wicket victory over bitter rivals Australia to set up a Cricket World Cup final with New Zealand. 

England made a sensational start to the Cricket World Cup semi-final against Australia by removing Aaron Finch, David Warner and Peter Handscomb inside seven overs.

Finch and Warner had combined for more than 1,100 runs at this tournament but made just nine between them as Jofra Archer and Chris Woakes each picked up a huge early scalp, before the latter also removed Handscomb to leave Australia reeling at 14-3.

Captain Finch won the toss and opted to bat at Edgbaston on Thursday but may have been ruing that decision when he was trapped in front by Archer from the first ball he faced.

To make matters worse, Finch opted to use the DRS and three reds on the ball-tracker meant his side lost their review after just seven deliveries.

Warner crunched two fours off Woakes but he perished for nine in the next over, edging to Jonny Bairstow at slip.

Handscomb, selected due to Usman Khawaja's hamstring injury, survived a review on umpire's call first ball but was soon cleaned up by Woakes as England tore into the top order.

Australia won the toss and chose to bat first against England in Thursday's Cricket World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston.

The tournament hosts struggled badly when chasing against Aaron Finch's men during the group-stage defeat at Lord's, while they also showed frailties in failing to overhaul a moderate score in a shock loss to Sri Lanka at Headingley.

England captain Eoin Morgan confirmed his side was unchanged from the one that hammered New Zealand to seal a place in the semis, while Australia's sole alteration sees Peter Handscomb come in for the injured Usman Khawaja, as had been announced by head coach Justin Langer prior to the game.

There had been talk that Matthew Wade - called into the squad as Khawaja's replacement - may be selected ahead of Glenn Maxwell, but the all-rounder retained his place in the XI.

Not since 1992 have England gone this deep at the World Cup, while Australia are aiming to continue their perfect record in semi-finals, having progressed from all seven of their previous matches at this stage of the competition.

The victors will go through to Sunday's final at Lord's to face New Zealand, who sensationally defeated India at Old Trafford on Wednesday.

Peter Handscomb is a certainty to be in Australia's XI for their Cricket World Cup semi-final showdown against England, according to head coach Justin Langer.

Handscomb was called up to Australia's squad as a replacement for Shaun Marsh after the left-handed batsman broke his arm in a training session, though is likely to have to step in for Usman Khawaja – who has been ruled out of the rest of the World Cup with a hamstring strain.

And Langer has full faith in Handscomb to deliver at Edgbaston on Thursday, despite having missed out on the initial squad.

"I'll tell you the truth. Peter Handscomb will definitely play, 100 per cent" said Langer. "He deserves it.

"He was unlucky not to be on this tour, he was so unlucky not to be in the initial squad after what he'd done to get us to that point.

"He's in good form, he played well for Australia A, gives us that nice balance in the middle order. He's got good temperament, he plays spin well, he's on top of his game, so Pete will definitely play."

Handscomb praised his coach's alternative methods on Monday, after Langer instructed Australia's players to walk around the outfield barefoot to 'earth' themselves ahead of the game, and Langer revealed it was a habit he and former opening partner Mathew Hayden used to practice.

"What was it called?" asked Langer. "I don't know what you call it, we just took our shoes and socks off and walked a lap of the oval.

"It's a nice thing to do, it's a nice place to be. Haydos and I used to do it, just as a bit of a ritual before every Test match."

While Handscomb will definitely feature, Marcus Stoinis will also be fit to play after recovering from a side strain sustained against South Africa.

"He looks good," Langer said of Stoinis following Wednesday's net session in Birmingham.

"It was a very good nets actually, there was a bit of heat in there again and it was very competitive and that always brings the best out in Stoinis, so he did a good job and he's fit to go."

Peter Handscomb believes Justin Langer's decision to have Australia's players walk around the Edgbaston outfield barefoot has helped bond the squad.

Langer labelled himself as "a bit of a hippy" when he took over as Australia coach and he provided an example of his alternative methods when he directed his team to walk on the ground where they will face England in Thursday's Cricket World Cup semi-final without shoes and socks.

The technique has been dubbed "barefoot healing" and "earthing", and its practitioners include State of Origin side New South Wales Blues.

Handscomb, who was called up to Australia's squad as a replacement for Shaun Marsh after the left-handed batsman broke his arm in a nets session, is fully behind Langer's approach.

"It was nice. You get a feel of the grass on your feet, a bit of grounding, the positive and negative energy flowing through and coming out of the earth," Handscomb told reporters.

"It is a nice feeling and you walk round with the group, have a bit of a laugh while you're going and talking.

"It is just a nice moment. It was just a moment to get a feel for the ground, literally.

"It's something the coach has done before at other venues for a bit of grounding.

"You do that lap and you can see all the different views from the ground and where you might be fielding and it gives you an opportunity to take it all in before it all starts on Thursday."

Australia have already beaten World Cup hosts England in the group stage, though they head into the semi-finals having lost their final round-robin match against South Africa.

The creme de la creme will be involved in the Cricket World Cup, but there are plenty of talented players who will not feature when the tournament begins this week.

Each of the 10 nations involved in England and Wales named 15-man squads for the competition, which meant selectors faced some difficult decisions before settling on their chosen line-ups.

Here, with the help of Opta, we take a look at the best 11 players who will not be involved.

Niroshan Dickwella (Sri Lanka)

Sri Lanka's dreadful pre-World Cup form led to changes for this tournament and Dickwella was one of those to pay the price. He was out in single figures in all three of his innings against South Africa in March.

Opta fact: Despite his recent struggles, Dickwella has amassed more ODI runs (1,388) than any other Sri Lankan batsman since the start of 2017.

Imrul Kayes (Bangladesh)

Imrul has been out of the ODI picture since December having been dismissed for four and a duck against West Indies. Prior to that, though, he had accrued 349 across three innings against Zimbabwe, so there was some surprise he was deemed surplus to requirements.

Opta fact: Of the 124 men to have registered at least eight ODI innings in 2018, Imrul's average of 62.3 was the eighth-highest.

Rishabh Pant (India)

Dinesh Karthik, who turns 34 during the tournament, was preferred to Pant, 21, as back-up wicketkeeper to MS Dhoni. Given Karthik and Dhoni's advancing years, Pant's time will surely come but the explosive youngster is only on the standby list in 2019.

Opta fact: Pant has starred in the Indian Premier League, scoring the second-most runs (1,172) over the last two seasons behind only KL Rahul (1,252). Pant also claimed the most dismissals for a wicketkeeper (24) in this year's tournament.

Ambati Rayudu (India)

Rayudu had been earmarked for the number-four slot in India's batting line-up but lost out to Vijay Shankar due to the latter's 'three-dimensional' qualities. Rayudu had some fun with that, saying on Twitter that he had ordered "a new set of 3D glasses to watch the World Cup".

Opta fact: In his 35 ODI innings outside of India, Rayudu has averaged 47.4. Only Virat Kohli and Dhoni have better records among those to have played for the country as often.

Dinesh Chandimal (Sri Lanka)

Despite being his nation's captain as recently as six months ago, Chandimal was another high-profile Sri Lankan to be omitted. A regular throughout 2017 and 2018, Chandimal's last ODI century was in August 2016.

Opta fact: Chandimal has scored a half-century in four of his last six ODI innings in England and Wales.

Peter Handscomb (Australia)

Australia had to find a way to include Steve Smith and David Warner following their returns from bans, and wicketkeeper-batsman Handscomb was the unfortunate one to miss out despite starring in the duo's absence.

Opta fact: Prior to naming their preliminary squad, Handscomb had featured in 13 straight ODIs, scoring a century and three half-centuries while averaging 43.5.

Kieron Pollard (West Indies)

All-rounder Pollard has not played an ODI since October 2016 but many thought he might have been involved on the back of a fine IPL, when he helped Mumbai Indians to a record fourth title.

Opta fact: As well as averaging 49.2 across his final 11 innings in this year's IPL, Pollard has the experience of appearing in two previous World Cups (2007 and 2011).

Dwayne Bravo (West Indies)

It has been nearly five years since Bravo appeared in an ODI and he retired from international cricket in October 2018, but the all-rounder is still on the standby list having scored 2,968 runs and taken 199 wickets for the Windies in this format.

Opta fact: Only 21 men have scored over 2,500 ODI runs and claimed at least 150 wickets and Bravo is one of three West Indians to have done so - along with Chris Gayle and Carl Hooper.

David Willey (England)

Someone had to make way for the talented Jofra Archer and left-armer Willey, useful with bat and ball, was the unfortunate player to miss out. Willey has been a major part of England's recent white-ball success but, even in his absence, Eoin Morgan still has Archer, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood, Tom Curran, Liam Plunkett and Ben Stokes as seam options.

Opta fact: Since his debut in May 2015, no player has opened the bowling more often for England in ODIs than Willey (44 - level with Woakes)

Josh Hazlewood (Australia)

A back injury contributed to Hazlewood's absence from Australia's squad, though the seamer is expected to be in England later in the year for the Ashes series.

Opta fact: Hazlewood produced his best ODI figures in the last major tournament to take place in England - the 2017 ICC Champions Trophy - taking 6-52 against New Zealand.

Junaid Khan (Pakistan)

Included in the preliminary squad, Junaid was axed after disappointing in the warm-up series with England as the selectors went back to Mohammad Amir and Wahab Riaz. Having featured in 76 one-day games for his country, Junaid's experience will be missed.

Opta fact: Junaid has taken a wicket in each of his previous six ODI appearances in England and Wales.

The returns of Steve Smith and David Warner could make Australia a real force in the Cricket World Cup but it has also given the selectors a headache.

Australia have been resurgent in the 50-over format, securing a 3-2 series win in India and winning the first two ODIs against Pakistan in the United Arab Emirates.

Head coach Justin Langer stated that it would be "crazy" not to include Smith and Warner for the World Cup.

But that bodes the question, which players will make way to accommodate two of the best batsmen in the world?

With Smith and Warner's 12-month bans for their parts in the ball-tampering scandal ending this week, we look at how the return of the former captain and vice-captain could affect some of the members of the current squad.

 

ASHTON TURNER

Batting all-rounder Turner would appear to be one of the most vulnerable players.

The 26-year-old made a brutal unbeaten 84 from just 43 balls in a sensational victory over India in Chandigarh this month, but it would be no surprise if he is overlooked.

There is no doubting the clean-striking Turner's ability, yet more experienced ODI batsmen are above him in the pecking order.

 

SHAUN MARSH

Marsh certainly has experience on his side, but that may not be enough to secure a seat on the plane.

The 35-year-old left-hander made a superb 91 not out in the first match of the series against Pakistan in Sharjah and he is more than capable of delivering under pressure in a World Cup.

Regardless of the contribution Marsh makes in the remainder of the series in UAE, he could be in for disappointment when the squad is named.

 

ALEX CAREY

Wicketkeeper-batsman Carey has donned the gloves in India and UAE, but he is certainly not guaranteed to make the cut.

Matthew Wade and Tim Paine could be preferred to Carey, while Peter Handscomb provides another keeping option.

Carey has not scored an international half-century, but the recent form of batsmen at the top of the order has given him limited opportunities at the crease.

 

PETER HANDSCOMB

Handscomb has struggled at Test level, but scored a timely first ODI hundred in Chandigarh.

He followed it up with a half-century in Delhi and made an unbeaten 30 in the first match of the series against Pakistan.

Handscomb's keeping skills are a major plus and he has given himself a strong chance of being selected.

 

USMAN KHAWAJA

Khawaja spent two years in the ODI wilderness before returning for the home series with India in January.

The left-hander has grasped his opportunity with both hands, scoring two hundreds and four half-centuries at the top of the order.

Khawaja averaged 76.6 in the series win in India and crafted 88 in the second ODI against Pakistan, so he has surely done enough to merit a place but is unlikely to open in the World Cup with Warner set to come back into the fold.

Australia have played 43 games across all formats in the time Steve Smith and David Warner have been banned - and the statistics suggest the two should have no problem walking back into the XI for the upcoming Ashes.

Ex-captain Smith and former vice-captain Warner are available to be selected for their country again from this week when the 12-month bans for their roles in the Cape Town ball-tampering scandal come to an end.

Here, with the help of Opta, we take a look at how Australia's batsmen have fared across all three formats over the past year without the duo.

 

TESTS (P9 W3 D2 L4)

The first Test without Smith, Warner and Cameron Bancroft, who was given a nine-month ban for his part in the saga, ended in a 492-run loss to South Africa as the Proteas wrapped up a 3-1 series success.

Matthew Renshaw was one of those drafted in for that final match in Johannesburg, but having scored a cumulative 13 across two innings, he has not appeared in a Test since. 

Peter Handscomb initially filled Smith's spot at four and averaged fewer than 19 across seven innings, though Joe Burns was one of the success stories, the opener's 180 against Sri Lanka last month helping him to an average of 50 over the past year.

Travis Head (51) had a better average than Burns in that time, but openers Aaron Finch (27.8) and Marcus Harris (32.7) were unable to replicate Warner (48.2), particularly when they struggled in a 2-1 home series loss to India.

Having made his Test debut in October, Marnus Labuschagne batted at four in the recent two-match series with Sri Lanka, yet his average of 26.3 pales in comparison with Smith's 61.4.

 

ODIS (P18 W7 L11)

With a World Cup on English soil looming on the horizon later in 2019, Australia's 50-over fortunes were looking grim as little as three weeks ago.

A five-match series in India began with defeats in the opening two matches, meaning the world champions had lost 11 of 13 ODIs since the Newlands scandal.

But a stunning comeback sealed a 3-2 win over Virat Kohli's men, and Australia have continued that momentum in the UAE, where successive Finch hundreds mean the tourists lead Pakistan 2-0 in a best-of-five contest.

Those centuries have lifted Finch's ODI average across the past year to 39.4, while the likes of Usman Khawaja (60.9), Shaun Marsh (59.3) and Handscomb (52.1) have all benefitted from opportunities they may not otherwise have had.

Two months out from the start of the World Cup, the holders appear to be finding form at just the right time, and the returns of Smith and Warner will leave head coach Justin Langer nursing a welcome selection headache.

 

TWENTY20S (P16 W7 L8 NR1)

Smith's ban had little effect on his nation's T20 form - the 29-year-old having not featured in that format since March 2016 - yet Warner left a bigger void to fill having scored more than any other Australian in the shortest format.

Despite that, four leading batsmen averaged more than Warner's 26.7 over the previous 12 months.

Finch amassed 465 runs, though that total comes with the caveat that 324 of those were accrued in his first three innings. In his past 13 T20 knocks for Australia, Finch has averaged only 10.8.

All-rounder Glenn Maxwell (averaging 34), D'Arcy Short (28.3) and Head (27.3) were the others to shine in Warner and Smith's absences.

Peter Handscomb hit his maiden one-day ton before Ashton Turner hammered Australia to a record-breaking four-wicket win over India, levelling the series at 2-2 with a game to play.

Shikhar Dhawan hit a career-best 143 and Rohit Sharma made 95 as India posted 358-9, the second-highest score posted in Mohali at the halfway stage of the contest.

Yet Australia impressively overhauled their opponents' total with 13 balls to spare, Handscomb setting up the chase with 117 as he and Usman Khawaja (91) shared a stand worth 192 after coming together at 12-2.

Still, the tourists required a stunning late onslaught from Turner, who cleared the ropes six times as he capitalised on three reprieves to help his team complete their highest ever run chase in the 50-over format.

The all-rounder hit an unbeaten 84 from just 43 deliveries to set up a series-deciding showdown in the fifth and final ODI, which takes place in Delhi on Wednesday.

Pat Cummins had earlier claimed his first five-wicket haul in the format, yet India still managed to post a sizeable score after opting to bat first.

Dhawan had scored just 22 runs in the first three games but returned to form with his 16th one-day ton, the left-hander putting on 193 with opening partner Rohit, who looked set to reach three figures himself until holing out to deep midwicket.

After centuries in his last two knocks, Virat Kohli made just seven as wickets tumbled in the closing overs, Cummins taking four of them in his final two overs to finish with figures of 5-70.

Australia's task in reply suffered a disastrous start when they lost skipper Aaron Finch - cleaned up by Bhuvneshwar Kumar for a two-ball duck - and Shaun Marsh (6) early.

Khawaja and Handscomb combined superbly to put the pressure back on their opponents, though the former missed out on a second successive hundred when a running Kuldeep Yadav held on to a top edge. 

Glenn Maxwell made a breezy 23 but the wicket of Handscomb, whose attempt to hit Yuzvendra Chahal over the rope presented a simple catch to long off, appeared to put India in control of the contest. 

Turner, however, had other ideas. Making the most of a missed stumping by Pant - as well as two drops in the outfield - he hit a barrage of boundaries, flipping what at one stage seemed a taxing equation into a formality.

Glenn Maxwell was described as "a freak" by Peter Handscomb after his stunning unbeaten century guided Australia home against India in Wednesday's second Twenty20.

Chasing 191 for victory in Bengaluru, Australia were toiling at 22-2 when Maxwell walked in, and what followed was one of the finest T20 knocks ever seen.

Maxwell hammered 113 off only 55 balls, including seven fours and nine sixes, to secure victory by seven wickets in the final over and hand the tourists a 2-0 series success, backing up the 56 he made in Sunday's last-ball thriller.

Handscomb contributed 20 not out off 18 deliveries in a match-winning stand of 99 and afterwards paid tribute to his team-mate's sensational innings.

"I just tried to get Maxy on strike, that was the plan, and it was great to be there until the end," he said. "We wanted to make sure there's an in batter at the end, and it was the batters' job to complete the job.

"He is a freak, he can play shots other people can't, and he's really matured now. It was just a pleasure being at the other end."

Maxwell added: "It was a pretty good wicket, so we were able to wait for anything slightly off line or length. We just needed to get it to about 11 or 12 an over for the last four overs, and back ourselves from there. After D'Arcy [Short]'s dismissal it was up to me to sit around and drive the innings forward.

"Pete Handscomb did a great job of getting off strike and being busy. We were able to keep consistently having good overs and keep the [required] run rate in check.

"We were just talking about how we haven't had a lot of success here. To come and perform as well as we have in these two T20s, it's a great start to this tour."

Losing captain Virat Kohli, meanwhile, conceded there was little his side could have done to stymie Maxwell in that sort of form.

"Australia outplayed us in both games, they were more clinical with bat, ball and on the field," said Kohli, who struck six sixes in his thrilling 38-ball 72.

"We put up a decent total, 190 is a good score on any ground, but there was too much dew around, and when Maxy plays an innings like that, you can't do too much."

India marched towards a big victory over Australia before rain washed out play to offer the hosts some relief on day three of the fourth and final Test in Sydney.

Australia battled to 236-6 – in response to India's 622-7 declared – when the match was halted due to bad light and wet weather just before 4:30pm local time at the SCG on Saturday.

The third day was eventually abandoned shortly afterwards, with the beleaguered Australians still 386 runs behind as Peter Handscomb (28 not out) and Pat Cummins (25no) tried to put up a fight.

It was another day of dominance from India, who are seeking their first Test series victory in Australia having already retained the Border-Gavaskar Trophy.

With their backs against the wall, Australia – resuming on 24-0 – made an encouraging start to the morning but that glimmer of hope took a hit when the top order crumbled in a collapse of 24-3.

Usman Khawaja (27) was the first to go when he misjudged a Kuldeep Yadav (3-71) delivery and was caught by Cheteshwar Pujara.

Australia attempted to remain positive, digging deep against pace and spin as they reached 122-1 at lunch, with Marcus Harris a shining light courtesy of his 77.

Harris, however, was unable to build on his promising innings after a moment of indecision saw the opener chop on to his own stumps off Ravindra Jadeja (2-62) for 79.

India struck again through Jadeja, who claimed his second wicket when Shaun Marsh (8) pushed at the ball and was caught at slips, and Australia were quickly reduced to 152-4 as debutant Marnus Labuschagne (38) fell victim to Mohammed Shami (1-54).

Travis Head added 20 and looked set before chipping a full toss back to Yadav as he threw his wicket away in the penultimate over of the second session.

Captain Tim Paine's (5) stay at the crease was brief as Australia's hopes of avoiding the follow-on rested on under-pressure batsman Handscomb and Cummins.

India have opted against selecting Ravichandran Ashwin for the fourth Test against Australia, instead picking Kuldeep Yadav as their second spinner in Sydney.

Ashwin was initially ruled out of India's squad due to the side strain that kept him out in Perth, only for the tourists to then change tack and reveal a decision on his availability would be made on the morning of the game.

The off-spinner did bowl at the Sydney Cricket Ground prior to Thursday's toss, but was ultimately left out as India picked Kuldeep in place of Ishant Sharma, giving them a second frontline spin option in addition to Ravindra Jadeja.

India won the toss and opted to bat, with KL Rahul replacing Rohit Sharma in their other change. Rohit had been ruled out earlier in the week after returning home for the birth of his first child.

Australia's team also shows two alterations, with Aaron Finch and Mitchell Marsh axed.

Usman Khawaja will open in Finch's absence, while Marnus Labuschagne is slated to bat at three and Peter Handscomb returns in the middle order.

Holding a 2-1 lead in the series, India have already retained the Border-Gavaskar Trophy but must avoid defeat in Sydney to complete a first Test series win in Australia.

Captain Tim Paine said a final inspection of the SCG pitch will decide Australia's plans for the fourth Test as the hosts look to deny India a series victory.

Australia – trailing 2-1 in the series after India retained the Border-Gavaskar Trophy with victory in Melbourne – opted against finalising their XI for the final Test in Sydney, starting Thursday, amid doubts over opener Aaron Finch and all-rounder Mitch Marsh.

Finch – who could drop down the order – is under pressure at the top of the order, having managed just 97 runs in six innings, with a top score of 50 in Perth.

Marnus Labuschagne was also added to the squad following Australia's 137-run defeat to India in the Boxing Day Test last week.

"It's just team balance really," Paine told reporters in Sydney on Wednesday, with his side desperate to prevent Virat Kohli's men from becoming the first India team to win in a Test series in Australia.

"There's ongoing discussion the last day or two but we'll have a final look at the wicket [this afternoon] and we'll have our last chat then.

"We're not too far away. As I said all along, we'll be looking to pick the best XI that we think is the best combination to win this Test and the wicket will play a part in that."

Peter Handscomb could also return to the side, having been dropped for Marsh for the MCG clash against India.

Marsh failed to capitalise on his return, posting scores of just nine and 10 as Australia were outclassed in Melbourne.

"If we think India were to play two spinners Pete could be a really important player for us," Paine said. "We know how good a player of spin he is. That's one of the discussions we'll be having today, if we think India will go that way and if they are, are we prepared to bring him back in.

"I'm sure if he does [play], he's an excellent player of spin and contributes a lot to the group in the field and around the team. He's a bit like Marnus in that he's a very good package, a good person around our team."

Peter Handscomb sent a timely reminder to the Australia selectors with a superb 70 to propel Melbourne Stars to their first victory of the Big Bash League season.

Handscomb was dropped for Australia's third Test with India at the MCG but he did not let the disappointment faze him as the Stars cruised to a five-wicket win over Sydney Sixers on Thursday.

His knock, from just 35 balls, was a welcome boost for the Stars after defeats in their first two matches had left them bottom of the table.

The wicketkeeper also impressed with the gloves as the Sixers were limited to 130-9, Handscomb stumping Jack Edwards off the second ball of the match.

His catch removed Sean Abbott later in the proceedings after Nepalese leg-spinner Sandeep Lamichhane had impressed with 2-18.

The Sixers' total was never going to be enough for them to claim a second win of the competition as Handscomb flew out of the blocks with an aggressive approach that is sure to grab the attention of the Test selectors.

He cleared the SCG ropes on three occasions and added nine boundaries before giving a simple catch to Moises Henriques with Melbourne 22 runs shy of their target, but it mattered little as victory was secured with 31 deliveries remaining.

HANDY HANDSCOMB SHOWS HIS WORTH

The opener raced to fifty from just 22 balls as he launched a blistering attack, reaching his half-century having hit six fours and three maximums.

He had some fortune as he continued to amass runs and although he was unable to complete the job, he made sure that victory was a mere formality.

LAMICHHANE'S STAR CONTINUES TO RISE

Teenager Lamichhane has taken to the BBL like a duck to water, showing no signs of nerves in his debut campaign.

His variations caused the Sixers batsmen all kinds of trouble during his four overs as the 18-year-old beautifully deceived dangermen Henriques and Tom Curran.

Lamichhane has seven wickets to his name already for the Stars, which sees him top the standings alongside the Sixers' Steve O'Keefe, who claimed 2-22 in a losing cause.

 

SMOOTH AS SILK

There was not much else for the Sixers to get excited about as only four batsmen made double figures, but their total would have been much worse had it not been for Jordan Silk.

He made an unbeaten 41 off 37 in the middle order but had little assistance as the Sixers struggled to build momentum, only Abbott (22) able to give him any real support.

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