Brad Hogg believes Australia "need to find answers" after middle-order failures led to them bowing out of the Cricket World Cup.

Two-time World Cup winner Hogg is urging selectors to develop a long-term vision for the team, with a view to them being trophy contenders at the 2023 tournament in India.

And if long-standing members of the side such as David Warner, Steve Smith and Aaron Finch, all men in their thirties, are unlikely to be playing ODI cricket by that stage, Hogg has questioned whether they should hang around.

“What needs to change? Not much needs to change," Hogg told Omnisport.

"We just need to work out whether Warner and Smith, as well as Finch, are going to be around in four years’ time.

"Mitchell Starc – is his body going to hold up? We’ve got to make sure we get depth in our bowling department.

"But that middle order – we’ve got to find answers there. We’ve got to get a decent all-rounder, and we’ve got to have a number five that can handle the pressure."

Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis endured poor World Cup campaigns with the bat, neither making a half-century, and they were the glaring examples of middle-order underachievers.

"We can’t just rely on one batsman like [Alex] Carey to work through those tough situations at the end," Hogg said. "That’s probably the only holes I see that we need to fill."

Australia finished second in the group stage at the World Cup but an eight-wicket semi-final defeat at the hands of England was a painful way to wave trophy hopes goodbye.

Hogg, 48, was a limited-overs specialist, a tricky left-arm wrist spinner who would often add useful runs down the order.

He has noticed a pick-up in Australia's ODI performances, with series victories over India and Pakistan preceding their World Cup run.

They were thrashed 5-0 by England last summer, not long after the ball-tampering scandal that led to suspensions for Warner, Smith and Cameron Bancroft.

And Hogg feels Australia are now a far stronger unit.

He said the team appear "rejuvenated", adding: "You can turn things around in a couple of months. 

"Yes, we’ve had a tough time of it over the last couple of years but the attitude of this Australian team, I’ve been so impressed.

"They prepared well, they left no stone unturned, and where they were two months ago I wouldn't have given them a chance in this World Cup. These guys can hold their heads up high and Australians [can] be proud of these performances."

Jofra Archer is putting all Ashes talk on hold until after England's Cricket World Cup final showdown with New Zealand on Sunday.

The fiery fast bowler was born in Barbados and only became eligible to play for England this year, yet already he looks like a player who could make a lasting impact across all formats.

With James Anderson and Stuart Broad in the twilight of their international careers, the prospect of another prolific wicket-taking paceman coming into the Test side holds obvious appeal.

England's selectors will consider options for the Ashes in the coming weeks, with the opener against Australia beginning on August 1 at Edgbaston.

Asked about his Ashes chances, Archer said: "After Sunday I can probably answer that, but now I'm just focusing on trying to win the final."

He has 19 wickets at the World Cup already, emerging as the team's number one strike bowler, but is taking the achievements and the focus on him in his stride.

"I'm just glad the team's doing well," Archer said. "I could be doing terribly but as long as the team's winning I'm all right."

England have found prime form at the right time, getting out of group-stage trouble with victories over India and New Zealand before throttling Australia by eight wickets in Thursday's semi-final at Edgbaston.

Archer has vowed to keep unleashing bouncers at batsmen after one sparky delivery banged Australia's Alex Carey on the helmet, causing a chin injury that required six stitches.

The 24-year-old Sussex quick said: "You don't always mean to hit them. You just try to bowl a bouncer because it can be a wicket-taking ball or a dot ball.

"When it hits them you feel a little bit bad for doing it, but it's cricket and I don't think he'll be the last person to get hit."

Archer and England departed Birmingham in high spirits, and with a Lord's appointment booked the tournament hosts will target one last major push.

A niggling side issue should not prevent Archer playing a full part in the showpiece match, although when asked about the problem he admitted it was still causing some discomfort.

"A little bit but I'll keep soldiering on," Archer said. "I've been like this for a few games now. It's not getting any worse so that's a good sign."

Archer took eight wickets for Sussex against Middlesex in a County Championship match at Lord's last year, and facing the same opponents at the same ground he bagged a T20 hat-trick that included the scalp of England skipper Eoin Morgan.

But Archer said memories of the stadium left him with "mixed feelings".

"Sometimes I do OK, sometimes I don't do as well as I would like," Archer said. "Hopefully on Sunday it goes England's way, not just my way but England's way."

Pat Cummins cannot wait to return to Edgbaston and believes Australia will want revenge in the Ashes opener after their Cricket World Cup exit at England's hands.

Australia had to stomach a semi-final defeat to their oldest rivals on Thursday, when rampant England clinched an eight-wicket success with 17.5 overs in hand.

But the teams will return to the Birmingham ground for the first Test of their five-match Ashes series, with the August 1 start giving Australia an immediate focus as they cope with ODI frustration.

After England were roared on to victory by raucous supporters, Cummins said: "We're back here at Birmingham in two or three weeks. I know what to expect, know what to expect from the crowd."

England were beaten 2-1 by West Indies in their last Test series, in the Caribbean at the start of the year, and Cummins suggested Joe Root's five-day side are not the same proven force as Eoin Morgan's limited-overs team.

"They've got a couple of players but it's a pretty new team, their red-ball side," Cummins said, before returning to his theme of wanting to do better next time at Edgbaston.

"I don't need too much extra fuel, but it gives us a little more."

Cummins said Australia's disappointment would be tempered by their improvement as an ODI side in the past year.

"It's annoying and I'm peeved off at the moment," he said, before stressing he was "pretty proud of where we've come from".

"Last 12 months, if you told us we were going to be in a semi-final and come second in the group stage we'd have been really happy. In the knockout stages it happens, you get beaten by the better team on the day.

"I think we were always chasing that perfect game, but it just didn't come. We probably needed it out there [on Thursday].

"We managed to win games without playing the perfect game the whole way through."

Asked which team will win the World Cup, with New Zealand awaiting Morgan's men in Sunday's final at Lord's, Cummins said: "Probably England."

England star Jason Roy has been fined after reacting badly to his controversial dismissal in the Cricket World Cup semi-final win over Australia.

The opener's stunning knock was ended on 85 when he was given out caught behind despite replays showing he made no contact with a Pat Cummins delivery.

Roy initially refused to walk, but England had no reviews left so he had no choice but to leave the field.

He did so in evident disgust at umpire Kumar Dharmasena's decision, with his reaction constituting dissent and a breach of Article 2.8 of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel.

The 28-year-old, who admitted the offence and sanction, has been fined 30 per cent of his match fee and awarded two demerit points, but will be available for Sunday's final against New Zealand.

Eoin Morgan's side won by eight wickets at Edgbaston, having reduced Australia to 223 all out before completing their chase in 32.1 overs. 

Eoin Morgan lauded England's remarkable ODI revival after his side reached the Cricket World Cup final four years after a humiliating group-stage exit.

An eight-wicket thrashing of Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday underlined England's quality, which is a long way removed from the abysmal displays they produced at the 2015 tournament.

Back then they missed out on the knockout phase after losing to Bangladesh, marking a low point for English cricket in the one-day game.

But on Sunday they will contest a Lord's final with New Zealand, which Morgan could not have foreseen after their miserable outing in Australia and New Zealand last time out.

"If you told me after the last World Cup that we'd reach the final I wouldn't have believed you," the captain told the BBC's Test Match Special.

"It sums up how far we have come in the last four years. Everyone should take a huge amount of credit.

"Today was close to a perfect performance, right from the two bowlers up front. Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer bowled a hell of a spell.

"They put pressure on with early wickets and allowed us to stay on the front foot."

Speaking on the field, Morgan also praised the fans who roared England on to victory, marking their third triumph in a row after consecutive wins over India and the Black Caps pulled the hosts back from the brink of another early exit.

"I would like to thank the fans – we've had unbelievable support and Edgbaston has always been very kind to us," he said.

"Having beaten India in the group stages here we would've come here with similar confidence. The way we have taken momentum from the last two group games into the semi-finals is very important.

"We set the tone early and when we got on top we made Australia pay."

Aaron Finch conceded Australia had been "totally outplayed" by England as the hosts stormed into the Cricket World Cup final on Thursday.

England secured an eight-wicket win at Edgbaston after bowling Australia out for 223, with Jason Roy's explosive 85 doing much of the damage in a chase that was completed in 32.1 overs.

Australia, who won what was considered a potentially pivotal toss, were on the back foot almost immediately and Finch was among the early wickets to fall after failing to score.

"We were totally outplayed," said the captain after Australia's first World Cup semi-final loss. "The way they set the tone with the ball in those first 10 overs was a huge part in the game.

"You expect the new ball to seam a bit on any surface but they bowled a great length, hitting the stumps a lot.

"There are still a lot of positives to take out of the campaign and from the last few months – we've come a long way from where we were last year in ODI cricket in this country.

"You always want to win the trophy but there have been a lot of positives. A lot of hard work has gone in from a lot of people. I'm proud of how the group has progressed but this still hurts.

"We tried to change it up as much as we could but Roy and [Jonny] Bairstow are so dynamic when they are on top. We didn't execute as well as we could and got hurt by a very good England team."

It is the first time Australia have lost to England at a 50-over World Cup since 1992, which is also the last time the latter reached the final. 

Much of the talk around England and Australia's Cricket World Cup semi-final focused on one word – pressure.

And, with serial World Cup winners and reigning champions Australia perhaps more intent on Ashes glory later on this tour, the majority of those discussions centred on England.

Would they wilt at the semi-final stage? Could they chase down a total? Would the expectancy of the Edgbaston faithful weigh heavy on their shoulders?

The answer to all those questions was a resounding 'no', as Eoin Morgan's men stormed into a Lord's final against New Zealand with an eight-wicket thrashing on Thursday in front of an increasingly raucous crowd that belted out 'Sweet Caroline' with intensifying vigour as the end drew near.

A developing trend at these finals has seen sides win the toss, opt to bat, post a score and subsequently squeeze the opposition on deteriorating pitches.

Coming into this encounter, 17 of the previous 21 matches had been won by the side batting first – a sequence that included England's victories over India and New Zealand to secure their place in the last four.

On both occasions, the hosts went big and comfortably defended their totals, but the two prior outings had seen altogether different outcomes.

England failed to chase 233 against Sri Lanka at Headingley and were well short as Australia cruised to a 64-run win at Lord's.

Before the tournament, Morgan's men were seen as the team that could overhaul any score, thumping Pakistan 4-0 in an ODI series that featured two successful chases in excess of 340.

Those losses to Sri Lanka and Australia changed that perception, at least among pundits and the public, and another P-word – pressure – became a significant factor in the equation.

But that was nowhere to be seen at Edgbaston on Thursday, as Australia were rolled out for 223 before a below-par target was overhauled with 107 balls remaining.

Once again, England owed much to Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow, who added 124 for the opening stand inside 18 overs – their fourth successive century partnership.

In Wednesday's media conference, Aaron Finch talked up the importance of the first 10 overs. Whoever started the better would likely go on and win, was the suggestion.

The Australia captain got his first wish in winning the toss and opting to bat, only to fall to Jofra Archer for a golden duck and then watch as David Warner and Peter Handscomb swiftly joined him back in the dressing room. After 10 overs, Australia were 27-3 and had struck only three fours.

England, by contrast, had surpassed that tally inside six overs and had even added a Roy maximum for good measure en route to being 50-0 at the end of the first powerplay.

The chat in the media box during the innings break was that 224 could prove a challenging target – after all, England had failed in similar circumstances against Sri Lanka while there were lessons to be learned from New Zealand's semi-final win over India 24 hours previously, when the Black Caps successfully defended 239.

But Roy and Bairstow strode out as if this was a bilateral series bash-fest, an approach underlined by the former launching Nathan Lyon's first ball for six and reverse sweeping for four later in the same over.

Struggling to stem the flow, Finch turned to the occasional leg-spin of Steve Smith. Roy responded by hammering three straight sixes, the third an absolute monster into the top tier.

The early swing Chris Woakes and Archer had enjoyed was not evident for Mitchell Starc and Jason Behrendorff, while England's openers took full advantage as Roy produced another performance that will only intensify calls for him to be included in the Ashes squad.

Ahead of a World Cup final, that is a discussion for another day, but this display should at least put to bed all the prior talk of pressure and whether it would overwhelm this England team.

Exactly a year on from the men's football team's semi-final heartache, the Edgbaston crowd sang 'Cricket's coming home'. That is yet to be decided but, on this evidence, if England are found wanting at Lord's, it is unlikely to be due to the gravity of the occasion.

Chris Woakes was delighted as England demonstrated their class in an eight-wicket demolition of Australia to reach the Cricket World Cup final.

With figures of 3-20, Woakes' man-of-the-match display epitomised England's dominance of Thursday's clash at Edgbaston, where Australia were bowled out for 223.

Jason Roy (85) starred with the bat as the tournament hosts chased down the target in 32.1 overs, setting up a Lord's showdown with New Zealand on Sunday.

"I'm pretty speechless," said Woakes after England reached the final for the first time since 1992. "It was an incredible performance from the whole team.

"It started with the bowling performance and then the way they [the batsmen] knocked that off was outstanding.

"There were some nerves around this morning but that's natural going into a semi-final. The way we produced the goods just showed how good we are and where we are at as a team.

"It hasn't sunk in that we're in a World Cup final and hopefully we can go all the way.

"We were tipped as favourties so it was important to get to the semi-final in the first place, and then to win this in this fashion against this Australia side on the best ground in the world is amazing."

Jason Roy spearheaded a superb all-round England display in a crushing eight-wicket victory over bitter rivals Australia to set up a Cricket World Cup final with New Zealand. 

Mitchell Starc set a new record for wickets taken at a single Cricket World Cup when he dismissed England's Jonny Bairstow at Edgbaston on Thursday.

The Australia left-arm quick came into the semi-final having claimed 26 victims in his prior nine matches at the tournament, the same number as compatriot Glenn McGrath picked up at the 2007 edition.

Starc's haul included the 4-43 he took in the group-stage defeat of England at Lord's and he set the new benchmark by trapping Bairstow lbw for 34.

There was little cause for celebration for Starc, though, as that left England 124-1 in the 18th over after bowling Australia out for just 223.

Joe Root sent three of Starc's next four deliveries to the boundary, leaving the paceman with figures of 1-50 after five overs and England seemingly on course to set up a final showdown with New Zealand at Lord's.

Steve Smith's 85 was the saving grace for Australia as England restricted their opponents to 223 all out in the second Cricket World Cup semi-final.

Having won the toss at Edgbaston on Thursday, Australia slipped to 14-3 as Aaron Finch, David Warner and Peter Handscomb all fell cheaply to Jofra Archer (2-32) and Chris Woakes (3-20).

Smith mounted a recovery alongside Alex Carey (46), the pair adding 103 for the fourth wicket before the wicketkeeper took an unnecessary risk against Adil Rashid and holed out to deep midwicket.

Rashid (3-54) picked up Marcus Stoinis for a duck in the same over and also removed Pat Cummins after Glenn Maxwell had popped Archer to cover.

Smith received further support in the shape of Mitchell Starc (29) and it took a fine run out from Jos Buttler to end the former captain's innings, which lasted 119 balls and contained six fours.

It was a potentially crucial one for Australia, who have advanced from all seven of their previous World Cup semi-finals as New Zealand await the victors at Lord's on Sunday.

England made a sensational start to the Cricket World Cup semi-final against Australia by removing Aaron Finch, David Warner and Peter Handscomb inside seven overs.

Finch and Warner had combined for more than 1,100 runs at this tournament but made just nine between them as Jofra Archer and Chris Woakes each picked up a huge early scalp, before the latter also removed Handscomb to leave Australia reeling at 14-3.

Captain Finch won the toss and opted to bat at Edgbaston on Thursday but may have been ruing that decision when he was trapped in front by Archer from the first ball he faced.

To make matters worse, Finch opted to use the DRS and three reds on the ball-tracker meant his side lost their review after just seven deliveries.

Warner crunched two fours off Woakes but he perished for nine in the next over, edging to Jonny Bairstow at slip.

Handscomb, selected due to Usman Khawaja's hamstring injury, survived a review on umpire's call first ball but was soon cleaned up by Woakes as England tore into the top order.

Australia won the toss and chose to bat first against England in Thursday's Cricket World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston.

The tournament hosts struggled badly when chasing against Aaron Finch's men during the group-stage defeat at Lord's, while they also showed frailties in failing to overhaul a moderate score in a shock loss to Sri Lanka at Headingley.

England captain Eoin Morgan confirmed his side was unchanged from the one that hammered New Zealand to seal a place in the semis, while Australia's sole alteration sees Peter Handscomb come in for the injured Usman Khawaja, as had been announced by head coach Justin Langer prior to the game.

There had been talk that Matthew Wade - called into the squad as Khawaja's replacement - may be selected ahead of Glenn Maxwell, but the all-rounder retained his place in the XI.

Not since 1992 have England gone this deep at the World Cup, while Australia are aiming to continue their perfect record in semi-finals, having progressed from all seven of their previous matches at this stage of the competition.

The victors will go through to Sunday's final at Lord's to face New Zealand, who sensationally defeated India at Old Trafford on Wednesday.

Tournament hosts England face off against Ashes rivals Australia in a blockbuster Cricket World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston on Thursday.

Damaging losses to Sri Lanka and Australia left England fearing the worst for their last-four hopes, but an impressive response with wins over India and New Zealand booked their ticket to the knockout stages.

Australia's passage was far more serene, apart from a loss to India and an unexpected defeat to South Africa in their final group game, as the defending champions chase a sixth World Cup title.

Just over two weeks ago, it was Australia celebrating at Lord's as Jason Behrendorff and Mitchell Starc tore through England's batting order to seal victory despite Ben Stokes' valiant 89.

But Edgbaston has not been a happy hunting ground for Australia, with their last win at the venue in any format coming in a 2001 Test match. England have won three straight ODIs against their opponents in Birmingham, too.

History is not exactly on England's side, though, with their last Cricket World Cup win against Australia coming back in 1992 when Ian Botham stole the show, taking 4-31 with the ball and contributing 53 with the bat.

New Zealand, who defeated India in a rain-delayed semi-final at Old Trafford that spanned across two days, await in the final.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

A shock loss to Sri Lanka preceded England again falling short against Australia but the triumphs over India and New Zealand showed their mettle as they lived up to their billing as pre-tournament favourites. Australia missed out on top spot after losing to South Africa in their final group game but largely impressed during the group stages, Starc leading the wicket-taking list with 26.

WHAT THEY SAID

England captain Eoin Morgan on the team's return to form: "I think we're probably more confident than we were three games ago. I think we are probably a different team that played four games ago and three games ago. I think the loss against Sri Lanka hurt us. It was an overhang into the Lord's game and then when we came here we managed to produce something similar to the cricket we have been playing over the last four years and that was really encouraging."

Australia skipper Aaron Finch on his country's World Cup record: "I think World Cups are very special, they bring out the best in the best players, so I think that's why Australia have had a very rich history in World Cups. I mean, winning four of the last five, it's been a great achievement."

OPTA FACTS

- England have won 10 of the last 12 ODIs between the countries, though one of their two defeats in that run came at Lord's earlier in this tournament.
- Starc needs one more wicket to set a record for the most taken at a single World Cup - he sits level with Glenn McGrath's tally of 26 from 2007.
- Steve Smith has only managed to record one half-century in his last 10 ODI innings against England, though that solitary 50 did come at Edgbaston (2017). He has been dismissed five times by Adil Rashid in the 50-over format.
- Australia have been involved in seven previous World Cup semi-finals and have progressed to the final every time. 

Trent Boult says it was just a case of New Zealand's bowlers "keeping it simple" in the crucial opening spell that left India 5-3 in the Black Caps' 18-run Cricket World Cup semi-final triumph.

In a rain-affected contest that spanned two days at Old Trafford, 2015 finalists New Zealand booked their return to the showpiece despite only posting 239-8 with the bat.

Yet a 19-ball passage from Boult and Matt Henry swung the momentum firmly in the Black Caps' favour as Rohit Sharma, Virat Kohli and KL Rahul all departed for singles.

Henry accounted for Rohit, who had scored five centuries and has more runs than anyone at this World Cup, and his opening partner Rahul, while Boult trapped Kohli lbw and later revealed there were no special plans behind the electric start that led to India being dismissed for 221.

"It wasn't planned, I don't want it to sound like I'm a magician against the best player in the world," Boult said of removing the ICC's top-ranked ODI batsman Kohli.

"We know if we can get sides two or three down inside that first 10 [overs], and put pressure on the middle order, of course it's going to be challenging for anyone.

"We didn't really try too much, in my opinion, it was just about keeping it simple.

"It was nice to put a bit of pressure on those guys but I thought they absorbed it very nicely."

Dinesh Karthik's dismissal meant India were four down by the end of the powerplay and though Ravindra Jadeja (77) and MS Dhoni (50) gave India a fighting chance, the chase got away from them.

India captain Kohli pointed to the shocking start to their reply as being pivotal in the match, with Henry (3-37) enjoying some Old Trafford redemption after returning 1-76 in an expensive nine-over spell against West Indies in the group stage.

"Coming into the semi-final, we talked about it a lot, it doesn't matter what happened in the past," Henry added.

"We knew if we got to 240 we were confident we could defend that if we bowl well.

"I don't think we were expecting the start we got but taking those early wickets meant we could really put some pressure on and squeeze the run-rate."

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