West Indies finished on a high with a win over Afghanistan, but Jason Holder acknowledged they must be more consistent after a poor Cricket World Cup.

The Windies had not tasted victory since their first match of the tournament against Pakistan, back on May 31, ending their long wait for further success with a 23-run triumph.

But it was not just the failure to pick up the required results that frustrated captain Holder, who felt performances as a whole were not consistently up to scratch.

"I think inconsistency let us down, we were just inconsistent in the three departments," he said in the post-match presentation.

"Our fielding has a lot to improve. Our bowlers had a really good outing - credit to each and every bowler who put up their hand whenever called up - but the batting was very inconsistent as well.

"Going forward, we need to be a lot more consistent."

Chris Gayle was playing in his final World Cup match and his captain paid tribute to the opening batsman.

"It's hard to see him playing his last World Cup game, but I just personally want to say congratulations to Chris," Holder said.

"He's been an outstanding stalwart of the game for West Indies cricket and he's done leaps and bounds for our cricket. I want to wish him all the best in all his endeavours."

While the Windies said goodbye to a great, Afghanistan captain Gulbadin Naib saw positives in the younger members of his squad, with 18-year-old Ikram Ali Khil making 86 in their unsuccessful run chase.

Gulbadin said: "Ali is a youngster, an under-19 boy, but he showed his class today - and we have a lot of talented youngsters back at home."

And Afghanistan's skipper hoped the team would be able to learn from the experience of a World Cup campaign in which they failed to collect a point.

"We want to come prepared in every department," he said. "Hopefully I can take a lot from this tournament, how you work on your team. I have learned a lot here."

West Indies signed off from the Cricket World Cup with a 23-run win over Afghanistan at Headingley - but Chris Gayle missed out on a place in the history books.

Victory meant the Caribbean side bookended their campaign in England with successes, having beaten Pakistan in their opener.

The rest of their campaign was better forgotten, however, and this could have provided another low moment until a mid-innings collapse from Afghanistan handed over the initiative.

Despite posting 311 for six, West Indies lost opener Gayle for seven. It was a third single-figure score of a disappointing World Cup for the veteran batsman and he finished the tournament as his team's fourth highest scorer.

And it meant he remains second on West Indies' all-time list of ODI run-scorers, stranded perhaps forever now 10 runs behind Brian Lara.

Gayle said before the World Cup this would be his goodbye to ODI cricket but the 39-year-old has since suggested he intends to play on. But in this sort of form, West Indies might do well to consider other options. 

This was surely a farewell to the World Cup for the showman and, after he was bogged down by Afghanistan's attack and looked to clout Dawlat Zadran over the off-side field, he nicked behind to Ikram Alikhil.

Evin Lewis showed better patience to make 58, Shai Hope plundered 77 and Nicholas Pooran scored 58 - with Gayle the only West Indies batsman to lose his wicket for a score below 30.

Afghanistan were then bowled out for 288, their chief contribution coming from 18-year-old Alikhil who reached 86 until he was defeated by Gayle's off spin.

 

Pakistan head into Friday's final Cricket World Cup group game against Bangladesh knowing the odds are stacked firmly against their semi-final qualification hopes.

Reaching the knockout stages remains a mathematical possibility for Sarfraz Ahmed's side following fourth-placed New Zealand's loss to hosts England on Wednesday. 

Yet, in reality, an improbable result of freak proportions will be required if the fifth-placed side are to overhaul a Black Caps team two points clear of them and with a superior net run rate.

If they are to stand any chance of extending their stay in England at all, they must bat first.

Should the toss go their way, they will then be required to record a victory of well in excess of 300 runs - 311 runs after posting 350 or by 316 runs after scoring 400 - in order to better New Zealand's net run-rate, which stands at +0.175 as opposed to Pakistan's score of -0.792.

Do not expect Bangladesh to be pushovers, however. They have proven tricky opponents throughout the tournament and in star all-rounder Shakib Al Hasan possess one of the top performers of this World Cup. 

Shakib has already claimed a place in the record books by becoming the first all-rounder in tournament history to score 500 runs and claim 10 wickets - and he is unlikely to be finished yet.


TOURNAMENT SO FAR

With four wins from their opening eight matches - including the scalps of England and New Zealand - there are plenty of positives for Pakistan to take from this World Cup. Consistency has evaded them, however, and there is an air of resignation to their fate.

It is a tournament which has delivered some memorable moments for Bangladesh too. That opening-match triumph over South Africa has set the tone for a series of spirited - and, on three occasions, winning - performances with the superb Shakib right at the very heart of it.


WHAT THEY SAID

Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed: "Definitely, we're interested in finishing on a high note. So we will try our best. It is very difficult - 316 runs is a big margin. Only if you're batting first, if you score 600 runs or 500 runs. I don't know what the study is behind [how positions are decided in future World Cups] but I can't do anything."

Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes: "There's no such thing as a dead rubber. Both teams desperate to beat each other. We certainly are. I'm pretty sure they are. They've got a lot to play for as well. So, we're looking to obviously win. We want to win. So if we can take the scalp of Pakistan in the World Cup, we'll be very, very proud of the boys."


OPTA FACTS

- Bangladesh have won their last four men's ODIs against Pakistan. Prior to this, Pakistan had recorded 31 wins from 32 clashes against the Tigers, including 25 in a row.
- Pakistan have won their last three Cricket World Cup 2019 matches; after becoming champions in 1992 they have only managed more consecutive victories at a single edition twice (four in both 1999 and 2015).
- Shakib Al Hasan has scored 542 runs so far, the most by a Bangladeshi at a single edition; in the process he has recorded six scores of 50+, only Sachin Tendulkar has recorded more in an edition of the tournament (seven in 2003).
- This will be the second meeting between Pakistan and Bangladesh at a World Cup, the first match took place when the tournament was last held in England (1999, Bangladesh won by 62 runs).

Chris Gayle will be eyeing another record when West Indies and Afghanistan get the chance to exit the Cricket World Cup on a high note at Headingley on Thursday.

The Windies are guaranteed to finish second-bottom of the group above winless Afghanistan regardless of the result in Leeds.

Jason Holder's side started the tournament by hammering Pakistan but have not won since that seven-wicket success at Trent Bridge at the end of May.

Afghanistan have lost all eight matches and will be looking for only their second World Cup victory at the venue where they ran Pakistan close on Saturday.

Chris Gayle needs 18 runs to break Brian Lara's record for the most ODI runs scored by a West Indies player in what will be his final World Cup match - and possibly his last ODI. 

The Windies have lost six consecutive matches and will be desperate to bring that run to an end in their first World Cup clash with Afghanistan.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

The men from the Caribbean looked the real deal when they thumped Pakistan in Nottingham, but their slight semi-final hopes were ended with a big defeat to India at Old Trafford last Thursday. Sri Lanka then consigned them to a 23-run loss on Monday despite a Nicholas Pooran century.

A lack of runs has cost Afghanistan, who were agonisingly close to defeating India at the Rose Bowl and threatened to upset Pakistan but were unable to finish off the job.

 

WHAT THEY SAID

West Indies Assistant coach Roddy Estwick: "Obviously we're not happy losing games. But we started to build something, and once we can remain patient, we can keep building. Young players are coming through, and once that keeps happening then things will get a lot better."

Afghanistan Captain Gulbadin Naib: "We played last four, five games quite well. I'm happy with the performance of the team. It's all depending on our batting strength: if you've not batted well, maybe it's difficult for bowlers to defend a small total."

 

OPTA FACTS

- Afghanistan have won three of their previous four completed ODIs against West Indies, including two World Cup qualifiers in Harare last year.

- West Indies have played five ODIs at Headingley, losing three and winning two of those matches.

- Gayle is set to play his 295th ODI, equalling Brian Lara for joint-most caps in the history of the format for the Windies.

Eoin Morgan hailed the "outstanding" Jonny Bairstow after his second successive century under pressure against New Zealand sent England on their way to the Cricket World Cup semi-finals.

Bairstow scored a brilliant hundred to set up a win over India on Sunday after taking a swipe at the critics who had piled into the hosts following defeats against Sri Lanka and Australia.

The opening batsman delivered again at The Riverside, striking 106 off 99 balls and laying the foundations for a crushing 119-run victory with Jason Roy (60) at the top of the order.

New Zealand could only muster 186 all out in reply to England's 305-8, Mark Wood taking 3-34 on his home ground and running out key man Kane Williamson backing up, getting his finger tips to a Ross Taylor drive.

England will face Australia or India in the last four at Edgbaston next Thursday and captain Morgan was full of praise for another hugely important knock from man-of-the-match Bairstow.

Morgan said at the post-match presentation: "I thought we were outstanding today. It started again with the two boys at the top of the order laying a good solid platform, playing in the manner that they do. Jonny going on to get a hundred was again match-winning today, it really was outstanding. 

"The wicket changed after I think the 25th over, it just started to slow up and become difficult to score quite freely. Every one of our batsman that came in after found that. 

"With so many on the board at that stage it was encouraging, but it was a matter of getting as close to 300 as possible, if not more, to be competitive.

"All pitches have gone inevitably slower and lower through the tournament throughout every game that has been played, it has been a theme of the tournament. If that continues, we will continue to bat first.

"Hopefully we can produce that positive, aggressive energy in the semi-final."

New Zealand are all-but assured of fourth place, with Pakistan highly unlikely to qualify even with a thumping win over Bangladesh at Lord's on Friday.

Jonny Bairstow made another magnificent century under pressure to set up a 119-run thrashing of New Zealand at The Riverside which sealed a Cricket World Cup semi-final spot for England.

Bairstow hit back at England's critics in emphatic fashion with a hundred in a crucial win over India on Sunday and the opener reached three figures again as England posted 305-8 after Eoin Morgan won the toss in Durham on Wednesday.

Destructive openers Bairstow (106 off 99 balls) and Jason Roy (60 off 61) put on 123 for the first wicket and the hosts looked to be on course for at least 350 before the Black Caps fought back.

Trent Boult, Matt Henry and Jimmy Neesham took two wickets apiece on a pitch that slowed up during the England innings.

New Zealand, missing paceman Lockie Ferguson due to a hamstring injury, were bowled out for 186 in reply, slumping to a third consecutive defeat after Kane Williamson was run out backing up at the non-striker's end by Mark Wood - who took 3-34 on his home ground.

England, in great danger of missing out on the last four following back-to-back defeats to Sri Lanka and Australia, will finish third and face either Australia or India at Edgbaston next Thursday in the semi-finals.

Tom Latham top scored with 57 for a Black Caps side that are all-but assured of a place in the last four, with Pakistan almost certainly on their way out on net run-rate even if they beat Bangladesh at Lord's on Friday.

 

BAIRSTOW AND ROY FIRE AGAIN

Bairstow and Roy made another blistering start, a rusty Tim Southee being sprayed around in his first match of the tournament before Roy drove the disciplined Neesham (2-41) to Mitchell Santner in the covers.

The aggressive Bairstow remained on the front foot, smashing Southee for a straight six and dispatching the paceman for two boundaries in his next over to reach three figures off 95 balls.

England lost their way after Boult (2-56) snared Joe Root (24) and Bairstow chopped on to a Henry delivery, gifting wickets away with poor aerial shots, Morgan (42) the only other batsman to make a notable contribution.

 

WOOD TIPS THE BALANCE IN ENGLAND'S FAVOUR

Henry Nicholls was trapped leg before first ball by Chris Woakes and opted against a review, which would have saved him, before Jos Buttler took a great catch down the leg side to remove Martin Guptill off Jofra Archer.

Williamson (27) and Ross Taylor were rebuilding nicely until Wood got a fingertip on a drive from the former skipper and the current captain was short of his ground.

Taylor was run out in the next over and New Zealand were teetering on 128-6 after Neesham chopped on to Wood, then Ben Stokes struck with his first ball to dismiss Colin de Grandhomme.

 

LATHAM DELAYS THE INEVITABLE

New Zealand never looked like chasing down their target, but Latham spent welcome time at the crease.

The wicketkeeper-batsman, poor with the bat in the World Cup so far, struck five boundaries before he was caught behind off Liam Plunkett.

Wood got rid of Santner and bowled Henry before Adil Rashid had Boult stumped to seal an emphatic win and see England through.

Mushtaq Ahmed believes England spinners Adil Rashid and Moeen Ali are ready to be match winners for the Cricket World Cup hosts.

Neither man has been at his most effective in the tournament to date, Rashid claiming seven wickets and Ali five.

But former Pakistan spinner Mushtaq, who worked with the pair as part of England's backroom staff in the past and now enjoys a role with West Indies, admires their qualities.

"They're good cricketers. They're match winners, Moeen and Adil," Mushtaq told Omnisport.

"Since they've been playing for England in one-day cricket and also Test cricket, Moeen Ali has gotten lots of wickets, and Adil also.

"Since they've been playing together, I can see England become a number one team, because in the middle overs they get lots of wickets, and they control the game in the middle overs, so I think they're both playing a huge role for England."

Mushtaq, who had spells in county cricket with Somerset, Surrey and Sussex, played 144 ODIs and 52 Tests for Pakistan in an international career that ran from 1990 to 2003.

He was frustrated by West Indies failing to produce at the World Cup, where they have won just once in eight matches and finish off against Afghanistan on Thursday at Headingley.

"I think we just didn't catch that moment where you close the game," said Mushtaq, speaking at the Pakistan Cricket Legends Tour in association with Penny Appeal.

"You know, we could actually win a few of the games like against New Zealand and against Australia. The things that were actually supposed to be winning situations we actually lost that period, lost those key points.

"So I think with the West Indies, obviously there were a few new guys in, there's plenty of things we have to discuss about that. When they played that first game against Pakistan, they seemed like they could be one of the four teams who are going to qualify for the semi-final.

"But obviously there's plenty of things to improve. They've got plenty of talent, but you've got to close that moment where you are actually nearly winning the game. So, we missed that opportunity."

Mushtaq also dismissed suggestions, raised by former fast bowler Shoaib Akhtar this week, that Pakistan skipper Sarfraz Ahmed is "fat" and "unfit".

"We should respect our players," said Mushtaq, on being presented with those claims. "They're giving everything for our country, they're trying to win cricket matches for Pakistan, so sometimes they lose, sometimes they win.

"I say that as an ex-cricketer, also part of Pakistan. Please respect your cricketers, they're trying to entertain you, they're trying to win games for Pakistan. If they don't, keep supporting your Pakistani heroes. They're the people who actually go and express themselves and they sacrifice a lot for Pakistan."

India batsman Ambati Rayudu has announced his retirement from all forms of cricket after missing out on the Cricket World Cup.

The 33-year-old was left out of the 15-man squad and did not get the call when Shikhar Dhawan and Vijay Shankar suffered tournament-ending injuries.

Rayudu, who played the last of his 55 ODIs against Australia in March, has decided to quit the sport.

In a letter addressed to the Hyderabad Cricket Association that was forwarded to the BCCI, Rayudu said: "I would like to bring to your kind notice that I have come to the decision to step away from the sport and retire from all forms and levels of the game.

"I would like to take this opportunity to thank the BCCI and all the state associations that I have represented, which include Hyderabad, Baroda, Andhra and Vidharbha.

"I also would like to thank the two IPL franchises MI [Mumbai Indians] and CSK [Chennai Super Kings] for their support. It has been an honour and privilege to have represented our country.

"I would like to thank the captains I have played under - MS Dhoni, Rohit Sharma and, especially, Virat Kohli, who always had shown great belief in me throughout my career with the Indian team.

"It has been a wonderful journey of playing the sport and learning from every up and down it brought for the last 25 years at various levels. Finally, I would like to thank my family and all the well-wishers who have been with me throughout this wonderful journey."

Rayudu made three ODI hundreds and three half-centuries, averaging 47.05. He also played six Twenty20 internationals.

New Zealand's leading wicket-taker Lockie Ferguson has been ruled out of Wednesday's Cricket World Cup clash with England.

The fast bowler, 28, has taken 17 wickets during the group stage, putting him second on the list of the tournament's most successful bowlers, behind Australia's Mitchell Starc.

However, a minor injury meant Ferguson was not considered for selection against England, with the announcement coming less than 90 minutes before play was due to begin at The Riverside.

New Zealand issued a statement on Twitter that read: "Lockie Ferguson has a tight left hamstring and will miss today's match against England as a precaution."

A win for either side secures a place in the semi-finals, while the loser will have to wait on the result of Pakistan's game against Sri Lanka at Lord's on Friday to find out if they will progress.

New Zealand batsman Ross Taylor defended "world-class captain" Kane Williamson after criticism of his approach at the Cricket World Cup.

The Black Caps appeared to be serenely on course for the semi-finals after going unbeaten through their first six matches but back-to-back defeats to Pakistan and Australia left their chances in the balance.

India's victory over Bangladesh on Tuesday means New Zealand go into Wednesday's meeting with England with their place in the final four all but guaranteed – only a heavy defeat at The Riverside and a big win for Pakistan over Bangladesh would see them miss out.

New Zealand's dip has led to questions about Williamson's captaincy style. While Taylor acknowledged it differs from his predecessor Brendon McCullum, he has full confidence in the skipper.

"I played under many different captains. Obviously, Brendon was the extreme and Kane has his own unique style as well," said Taylor.

"At the end of the day, you have to be true to yourself and be authentic and more often than not you get the right result.

"I think Kane is a fantastic, world-class batsman and a world-class captain. You don't have to look far, the last couple of matches. There's some pundits out there saying he was a great captain. We lose a couple of games and he is a bad captain. He is still a great captain, leads from the front and the team respect him and I love playing under him.

"I'd love as a team to take a little bit of pressure off him and score some runs and not let him do everything."

Elaborating on the difference between Williamson and McCullum, Taylor added: "Brendon would want to set very attacking fields throughout the whole match and Kane would pick his moments when he wants to attack.

"You can talk to numerous people, depending on who you want to talk to, [about] which is the right way. At the end of the day, if you win cricket [games], it doesn't matter [if you are] attacking or if you are not attacking, winning the game of the cricket is our main objective however you do that."

England captain Eoin Morgan also provided words of support for his Black Caps counterpart.

"Kane is an extremely good leader. I have played with him at [Sunrisers] Hyderabad. In the changing room, he wasn't a captain at the time I was there, but he is an impressive leader," said Morgan.

"The way he goes about his business is extremely admirable. He is a quality, quality cricketer who is extremely humble and open to learning all the time and offers his time to anybody as well."

Virat Kohli hailed Rohit Sharma and Jasprit Bumrah as "the best around" after they helped send India into the Cricket World Cup semi-finals.

India booked their last-four place with a 28-run win over Bangladesh on Tuesday, set in motion by Rohit's brilliant 92-ball 104 - his fourth century of the tournament.

A chase of 315 always looked beyond the Tigers, yet Bumrah made absolutely sure with a stunning spell to end the match, collecting wickets from consecutive balls to bowl Bangladesh out for 286.

In the post-match presentation, Kohli took the opportunity to pick out both players for individual praise.

"I have been watching [Rohit] for years now and I have been saying openly, in my opinion, he is the best one-day player around," the captain said.

"When he plays like that, it's a joy to watch. He's having the tournament of his life. We are so, so delighted to see him bat the way he is, because when he plays well, we know we are heading towards a big score.

"That's all we need in the changing room. When he plays like that with so much confidence, all the guys in the changing room get so much confidence watching him play.

"I'm really, really happy for him. He's really going well and hopefully, with three more games to go, he can put two big scores there."

Turning to top-ranked bowler Bumrah, Kohli continued: "Bumrah's overs were always going to be crucial, so that's why we stopped him after four overs initially.

"He is someone you can bank on at any time in the game. He's a world-class bowler, the best in the world at the moment. There's a good reason for that. He's been bowling consistently well."

Tamim Iqbal dropped Rohit early on, but Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza was not ready to acknowledge that moment as a turning point.

"With a batsman like Rohit Sharma in such good form, it obviously affects it," he said. "But that's what happens in cricket. We can't blame it just on that catch."

And Mortaza rued Bangladesh's failure to produce their own big-scoring partnership in the manner of Rohit and KL Rahul's opening stand.

"If one of them could have made 80 or 90 then it would have been a different match," he said. "With 47 and 41 [two of Bangladesh's three biggest stands], it's asking too much."

England will be playing for survival and New Zealand have momentum as their motivation as the teams go head to head in the Cricket World Cup at The Riverside.

Wednesday's high-stakes clash is one Eoin Morgan's tournament hosts can ill afford to lose, knowing in such a circumstance Pakistan would pip them to a semi-final slot should they beat Bangladesh on Friday.

And after Monday's high-scoring clash between Sri Lanka and West Indies in Durham, the final group-stage match for England and New Zealand could become a shoot-out between the big-hitting batsmen on both sides.

New Zealand, who are bidding to avoid a third successive defeat, should be safe in the final four whatever the result. They can be matched on 11 points by Pakistan but have a significantly better net run rate.

The Black Caps look sure to keep faith with struggling opener Martin Guptill, with team-mate Ross Taylor saying he needs a lucky break and has the squad "fully backing him" as they seek a return to winning ways.

England have Jason Roy and Jofra Archer fit after their respective hamstring and side problems, Morgan said on Tuesday.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

England made a bright start by winning four of their opening five matches, but defeats to Sri Lanka and Australia inflicted major blows. They were impressive in beating India last time out, with Roy, Jonny Bairstow and Ben Stokes all batting well.

New Zealand also began the tournament in style, but losses to Pakistan and Australia have pegged their progress. Guptill is out of sorts and needs a score. Lockie Ferguson and Trent Boult are cleaning up on the wickets front and pose a major threat.

 

WHAT THEY SAID

Morgan: "It was clear that after the Australia game there was a huge amount of disappointment in the changing room. The fact that we have been able to turn that around, identify where we are at and identify what we need to do in order to progress to the semis ... is important and it's been effective."

Taylor: "We saw Sri Lanka-West Indies 300 played 300, so I think we've got to expect that scores of 300-plus are probably out there. But in saying that, both teams have got very good bowling line-ups that can exploit conditions if suited and vice versa some very powerful batting line-ups as well."

 

OPTA FACTS

- England have won three of their last four ODIs against New Zealand. It is a different story in their World Cup rivalry, where England won the first three meetings between the teams but have since lost five in a row.
- New Zealand will be looking to avoid three consecutive defeats at the World Cup for the first time since 1979-1983.
- New Zealand's Kane Williamson passed 6,000 ODI runs in his most recent World Cup match, becoming the third-fastest man to reach the mark (139 innings) behind Hashim Amla (South Africa, 123 innings) and Virat Kohli (India, 136 innings).
- Boult became the first man from his country to complete a hat-trick in World Cup history, producing the feat last time out against Australia.
​- England's Liam Plunkett bowled a full 10-over allocation at a World Cup for the first time in his most recent match against India, taking his best figures ever in a World Cup game (3-55, econ 5.5).

Rohit Sharma made his fourth century of the 2019 Cricket World Cup as India booked their place in the semi-finals with a 28-run victory over Bangladesh, who can no longer qualify for the last four.

Virat Kohli's men saw their unbeaten start to the tournament ended by England on Sunday, but they got back on track two days later, thanks largely to in-form opener Rohit striking 104 off 92 balls in another batting masterclass.

Bangladesh needed victory at Edgbaston to keep their slim hopes of progression alive, yet a chase of 315 proved beyond them as Hardik Pandya (3-60) and Jasprit Bumrah (4-55) starred with the ball.

An early Tamim Iqbal drop off Mustafizur Rahman allowed Rohit to build momentum alongside KL Rahul (77), the pair combining for the biggest opening partnership of the tournament so far, which finally ended on 180.

Rohit fell to Soumya Sarkar two balls after reaching his hundred and India were rocking slightly when captain Kohli (26) and Pandya were both dismissed by Mustafizur (5-59) within the space of three balls.

However, Rishabh Pant and MS Dhoni hit 48 and 33 respectively to help their side to a healthy total of 314-9, the latter one of three victims for Mustafizur in the final over of India's innings.

Bangladesh made a steady start in reply, but talisman Shakib Al Hasan was the only member of the top five to kick on, reaching 66 in a continuation of his fine form.

When Shakib fell to Pandya, who had earlier dismissed Sarkar and Liton Das, the Tigers were 179-6 in the 34th over and staring defeat in the face.

Mohammad Saifuddin showed admirable defiance on his way to 51 not out off 38 balls, while Sabbir Rahman also chipped in with 36 as Bangladesh fought to stay in the game.

Yet Bumrah, who earlier required treatment following an awkward fall at the boundary, starred in the closing overs to make sure India prevailed.

 

Rohit reigns again

Rohit now has more runs at this tournament than any other player. He moved through the gears after being dropped on nine by Tamim in the fifth over and helped India to their best powerplay of the campaign, before continuing at a great pace to seemingly take the game away from Bangladesh.

Pandya spell pivotal

Mustafizur and Shakib threatened to really make things difficult for India. First, the bowler took a brilliant five-for to give Bangladesh hope, then Shakib produced another fine knock, becoming the first player to score more than 500 runs and take 10 wickets in a World Cup. However, Pandya's three wickets - including that of Shakib - came at a key time to restore control and Bumrah then came into his own at the death.

Angelo Mathews put his body on the line at The Riverside to turn the tide in Sri Lanka's thrilling Cricket World Cup win over West Indies, earning warm praise from captain Dimuth Karunaratne.

Having reduced the Windies to 84-4 in defence of their 338-6 in a dead rubber in Durham, Sri Lanka were given a major scare by Nicholas Pooran's defiant century.

His apparent one-man victory march was not halted until the 48th over, when Mathews bowled his first ball in ODIs since December 2017 and had Pooran caught behind.

With fitness concerns having kept him from bowling, it was a timely and heroic intervention from Mathews that did not go unnoticed by Karunaratne.

"Angelo put his hands up and said, 'okay I will bowl two overs'. He has that confidence. He did the job," said the Sri Lanka skipper after his side's 23-run triumph.

"I don't think he is going to bowl much more but if it is a crucial time he might bowl a couple of overs."

Avishka Fernando's maiden ODI century had laid the platform for Sri Lanka, whose exit from the competition was confirmed when hosts England beat India on Sunday.

Despite his side failing to reach the semi-finals, Karunaratne did not have a hard time finding the positives after Monday's result.

"To win any match is a great feeling," he said. "It gives us lots of confidence. All of the players are doing really well. That is what I was expecting as a captain."

In contrast, opposite number Jason Holder was left to reflect on a miserable campaign for the Windies, who have not tasted victory since thrashing Pakistan in their group-stage opener back in May.

This was their sixth defeat in eight outings, with only Afghanistan – who they face in their final game – faring worse.

"We have just got to be better," said Holder. "We've let some key moments slip in this World Cup.

"I thought their score was on par. Fernando batted well – showed us things get easier if you stay in. Pooran was excellent too.

"I thought we finished our bowling well, but our fielding let us down. We just want to play the perfect game next time."

Angelo Mathews' timely bowling cameo proved crucial as an Avishka Fernando-inspired Sri Lanka fought off a spirited West Indies response in an entertaining Cricket World Cup dead rubber at The Riverside. 

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