The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) once had Twenty20 vision to realise the potential for a new, shorter format to be added to the county structure.

What was set up as a method to attract a younger audience has become a global success worth millions, with T20 competitions springing up around the world - and not just traditional cricket-playing nations, either.

However, the ECB has decided the time is right to embrace change again. In 2020, the English game will see The Hundred come into existence.

Here, we attempt to answer some key questions about the tournament, including the teams involved, the players who are primed to play in it and where the games will take place.


The Hundred - what exactly is it?

A new concept for cricket in England that involves eight teams. A game will have two innings of 100 deliveries each (the clue is in the name).

There will be a change of end after 10 balls, rather than the usual six. Bowlers can send down five or 10 consecutive balls, while they are limited to 20 in the match. As for the powerplay, that will span 25 deliveries and a maximum of two fielders will be allowed outside the inner circle during that period of play.

It's cricket - just not as we know it.


And when will this take place?

From July 17 to August 16. The schedule – which runs during the school holidays in England – will see the teams play each other once, while each side will take on a 'rival' opponent both home and away, taking the total number of group games for each up to eight.

The top three in the table will then progress through to finals day, where second will play third in a semi-final to decide who will face the top seeds for the title.


What about the names and locations of the teams?

Well, the identities will be announced on Thursday at the initial draft. However, we do at least know the locations.

The 18 first-class counties have been grouped together in catchment areas based around international venues, two of which are situated in London. The full list is as follows (in alphabetical order):

- Birmingham (Warwickshire and Worcestershire - to play at Edgbaston)
- Cardiff (Glamorgan, Gloucestershire and Somerset - to play at Sophia Gardens)
- Leeds (Yorkshire and Durham - to play at Headingley)
- London (Middlesex, Essex, and Northamptonshire - to play at Lord's)
- London (Surrey and Kent - to plat at The Oval)
- Manchester (Lancashire - to play at Old Trafford)
- Nottingham (Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire - to play at Trent Bridge)
- Southampton (Hampshire and Sussex - to play at the Rose Bowl)


Will England players be appearing in it?

Absolutely! That includes their Test players too, albeit only for a limited stretch due to a home series against Pakistan, which starts on July 30.

The 10 individuals who were handed red-ball contracts for the 2019-20 season are not guaranteed to play for their 'home' teams, however.  Each roster will have at least one Test representative, with the chance to choose from the options available from their counties. However, Cardiff and the London franchise based at Lord's have no red-ball options tied to them.

Those with multiple options will have to make a choice on Thursday at the initial draft.

For example, if Leeds opt for all-rounder Ben Stokes (and why wouldn't they?), it means Jonny Bairstow and Joe Root could end up elsewhere, though if they are not chosen by another team, they will automatically be added to their original team's roster.

As well as Test stars, the teams will have the opportunity to announce two 'icon' players from their catchment, which will also be revealed on Thursday.

This is likely to be when some of the England squad who won the Cricket World Cup on home soil earlier this year will find out whether they will be staying close to home. However, there also could be some lesser-known names - at least globally - rewarded for their T20 performances at county level.


How many players on each team, and what about international signings?

There will be 15-man rosters for the teams to work with, which will be filled out during a further player draft on October 20.

Organisers has revealed some of the registered players already, with the list including World Cup-winning captain Eoin Morgan and England team-mate Moeen Ali.

Australia duo Steve Smith and David Warner will also be involved, along with Pakistan batsman Babar Azam, South Africa wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock and Afghanistan leg-spinner Rashid Khan. Oh, and the evergreen Chris Gayle, of course. It would not be a white-ball event without the 'Universe Boss'...

Do not, however, get excited about the prospect of seeing Virat Kohli or Rohit Sharma playing. India's current internationals are not set to be involved.


So how does the second player draft work, then?

A draw will decide the order for what will be a snake draft later in the month, meaning positions will be reversed in alternate rounds. Therefore, if you are up first in round one, you will be last second time around.

Each team must pick two players from seven set salary bands, which range from £30,000 to £125,000. Captains, by the way, get a £10,000 bonus.

Players have chosen their own reserve price, meaning they may pitch themselves out of the draft. Still, the biggest names will expect to earn the big money.

A team can pick three overseas recruits and, just prior to the tournament, will complete their 15-man line-ups by adding a wildcard - most likely an individual who impressed in the domestic T20 Blast earlier in the same season.

Cricket World Cup-winning captain Eoin Morgan, Ashes hero Steve Smith and West Indies superstar Chris Gayle have all made themselves available for The Hundred player draft later this month.

The new 100-ball competition begins next year, with the eight teams set to pick the England centrally contracted Test players they want to select on October 3.

A draft will follow 17 days later, with England's victorious skipper Morgan entering that alongside a host of premier international players.

Smith, who plundered 774 runs in the Ashes at an average of 110.57, will have a strong case for being selected early as an extremely accomplished batsman in all three major formats.

Gayle is another considerably talented player set to feature in the inaugural competition, as is the world's best ODI all-rounder, Bangladesh's Shakib Al Hasan, who was the third-highest run scorer at the Cricket World Cup behind Rohit Sharma and David Warner.

Teams will also be able to bid for the services of Warner, along with the likes of Babar Azam - the world's best T20 batsman - Rashid Khan, Quinton de Kock and Moeen Ali.

Players have the opportunity to select a minimum salary at which they will agree to play for a team. Each side is able to pick up two players in each of the seven salary bands, the highest being £125,000.

The Hundred starts on July 17, 2019 and runs until August 16.

Ashely Giles is thrilled Eoin Morgan elected to stay on as ODI captain following England's triumphant Cricket World Cup campaign.

Morgan led England to their maiden success in a 50-over World Cup in July, with the final settled in dramatic fashion at Lord's – the tournament hosts edging out New Zealand in a super over.

Following the tournament, the 33-year-old suggested he was undecided as to whether he should stay on as captain of the limited-overs side.

However, the ECB confirmed on Friday that Morgan would remain in charge and Giles is delighted with the batsman's decision with England now having the T20 World Cup in their sights.

"Eoin took some time to decide whether, all things considered, it was right to continue," Giles told Sky Sports.

"It didn't take him too long, thankfully. I'm delighted, he's been a great leader for us and with us losing [coach] Trevor Bayliss as well it's great for the team and the environment that he's staying on.

"Having one of those two guys still there gives us consistency and now we can look to perhaps go with the team we've got and to hold two white-ball trophies within a year would be a great achievement."

Bayliss called time on his tenure as England coach across all formats at the end of the Ashes series, but Giles is confident a replacement will be finalised within the coming weeks.

"I see one coach leading the whole thing. I've been part of a set-up where there are two coaches and role-playing that out, for me, it doesn't end particularly well," Giles told BBC Sport.

"If we have one head coach and some very good assistants, we are going to have to look after those guys well. The head coach would have some time off, so it's an opportunity for those assistants to lead in different forms.

"I hope we have a shortlist in a week to 10 days and we will go through interviews. We won't rush it but it would be nice to have someone in place before we leave for New Zealand."

Giles also added Alex Hales – who was dropped ahead of the World Cup due to an "off-field incident" – should not give up hope of returning to the fold despite not being given a central contract.

"The door isn't closed. He's a very fine short-format player," Giles said. "He needs to keep working hard and getting the runs - but if he does that, who knows?"

Joe Root will captain England's Test side regardless of their new head coach, Ashley Giles has confirmed.

Test skipper Root came under pressure in the recent Ashes series as England were held to a 2-2 draw, seeing Australia retain the urn as tourists for the first time since 2001.

The uncertainty around the coaching position added to speculation regarding the Yorkshireman's future, with Trevor Bayliss leaving his role following the series.

But Giles, the managing director of England men's cricket, has confirmed Root will continue to lead the side going forward.

"There have been no questions asked [about Root's future] by me," Giles told Sky Sports News. "I would hope that is the most important thing for now.

"One of the most important things for Joe is that we now redress that balance between red and white-ball cricket and we have more focus on Test match cricket.

"And when the new coach arrives, Joe gets a choice to sit down with him and really plan and decide a way forward - with me as well - our DNA around Test cricket going forward.

"If I were Joe, and we've had these discussions, we need to start planning towards winning the Ashes back in Australia in just over two years."

England will have one coach across all formats when they replace Bayliss, with Giles adding: "It's an exciting process because it's my first big appointment and we need to get it right."

The team's central contracts for the 2019-20 season were confirmed on Friday, with Eoin Morgan, England's white-ball captain, also set to continue in his role after winning the Cricket World Cup.

He has been given a limited-overs contract again, with Jofra Archer awarded an all-format deal.

The paceman starred in his first international campaign, playing key roles as England won the Cricket World Cup and drew the Ashes.

Rory Burns has been handed a Test contract following his performances against Australia, although Joe Denly got a white-ball deal.

Moeen Ali and Adil Rashid, previously contracted across all three formats, received limited-overs agreements, while Alex Hales, Liam Plunkett and David Willey missed out completely.

Jack Leach and Sam Curran were granted incremental deals.

Eoin Morgan wants to captain England in next year's Twenty20 World Cup but says he "needs more time" to reflect after a back injury.

Morgan led England as hosts as they won the Cricket World Cup, beating New Zealand in a classic final at Lord's last month.

But his future is uncertain in the aftermath of that success, while he has been battling a back injury that dogged him through the 50-over tournament.

Morgan is keen to continue in the limited-overs leadership role but will first take some time to consider his options, determined he will only captain the side if he is physically fit.

"I need more time to think, that's the honest answer," he told the BBC's Test Match Special. "It's a big decision, a big commitment.

"Given the injury that I went through in the World Cup, I need time to get fully fit.

"I actually need the season to end pretty soon so I can have that time to physically get fit and guarantee that it's not an injury risk between this year and next, and then I'll be able to make a call on that."

Asked if he wanted to skipper the side, Morgan added: "Absolutely. Who doesn't?

"I just don't want to let anybody down. When you lead, you have to lead from the front and you have to be physically fit.

"Finding form is another thing. Hopefully that works itself out."

Joe Root baulked at the suggestion he is under less pressure to deliver an Ashes series win because of his part in England's Cricket World Cup victory.

England and Australia resume their famous rivalry at Edgbaston on Thursday, the first of five Tests in a packed seven-week schedule as the hosts aim to build upon their breathless triumph over New Zealand at Lord's with another memorable success in the longest format.

Root was England's leading runs scorer as Eoin Morgan's men lifted the trophy, comfortably dispatching Australia in the semi-finals en route to glory.

But the 28-year-old is captain once again for Test duties, as he was when Australia took back possession of the urn with a 4-0 win on home soil 18 months ago.

"I think if you speak to anyone that's captained England and is on the verge of an Ashes series… to say that it doesn't mean as much as any other event, I don't think any of them would agree. It's huge," Root, who will step up again to the crucial number three position in England's brittle top order, told a pre-match news conference.

"Cricket in this country is at an all-time high and probably has interest it's not had for a long time. We've got an opportunity as a team to make this summer a very memorable one."

It is a joust limited-overs specialist Morgan will watch from afar.

Root spoke warmly of the Irishman's influence on his leadership of the Test team as he seeks to plot a similarly defining triumph.

"I'm sure he's still celebrating somewhere, to be honest," Root grinned. "He's obviously desperate for us to do well.

"He's been great with me in terms of helping me find my feet as a captain and someone I will always will look up to.

"He's a great man and a great leader. He'll be as supportive as anyone watching on from wherever he is – hopefully with a glass of red somewhere."

Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes return to the England side after sitting out last week's topsy-turvy Test win over Ireland – the duo prescribed rest after showing nerves of steel to guide England towards and through the super-over finale versus New Zealand.

"When you look back at that final and everything that it threw at the group who played in it, those are experiences you can hold with you for ever," Root said, acknowledging the lingering benefit such exploits could have over the coming weeks.

"For people like Jos and Ben, who spent a long period out there under pressure, it must make you think differently and it'll be interesting to see that unfold throughout this series.

"It can only be positive to have two senior players perform for a long period of time under the biggest scrutiny and pressure in the white-ball format.

"They've got a chance now to take that into the red-ball stuff and into this series."

England captain Eoin Morgan insisted he was yet to make a decision on his future, saying he needed more time to consider what is ahead.

Morgan, 32, led England to their first Cricket World Cup title earlier this month after a dramatic win over New Zealand in the final.

With some uncertainty over his future, Morgan said he would take a break before making a decision.

"After every major tournament or challenge, I'll always sit down and say 'how does the future look? How does the next six months, year, four years look?'" he told Sky Sports.

"I actually haven't had a chance to come down off the high of the World Cup yet, so it's been incredibly difficult to make a logical decision and that's when I make my best decisions.

"Next week, I'm going away with my wife to get away from the game, in a really nice way. I'm absolutely knackered – physically and mentally knackered. I need a little bit of time away to consider everything."

The 2020 ICC T20 World Cup is just 15 months away, while England will defend their 50-over crown in 2023.

Morgan said he needed to decide whether he was the man to continue leading England through the period.

"It's a big commitment – not only to go to the T20 World Cup next year, but to commit to the next 50-over World Cup," he said.

"This last five weeks has taken so much out of me mentally and physically. My levels of fitness with my back have always been in question and it's not a nice place to be in as a leader.

"At the forefront of it will be 'can I take the team forward?'"

England's dramatic Cricket World Cup final victory over New Zealand does not feel like a fair result, according to Eoin Morgan.

The showpiece at Lord's went down to a super over, after Ben Stokes had inadvertently deflected Martin Guptill's throw out for a boundary to keep England's chances of victory alive.

Stokes and Jos Buttler then amassed 15 runs in the additional over, a total which was matched by New Zealand, but an incredible contest was settled in England's favour courtesy of Morgan's side hitting more boundaries throughout their innings.

And Morgan conceded he has still not quite been able to make sense of the triumph, and is slightly troubled by winning in such a manner.

"I don't think it's fair to have a result like that when there's very little between the sides," Morgan told the Times.

"I don't think there was one moment that you could say, 'That actually cost the game there'. It was quite balanced.

"I'm black and white. I'm normally going, 'I know. I was there, that happened'. [But] I can't stick my finger on where the game was won and lost.

"I'm not sure winning it makes it any easier. A little bit [troubled], because there's no defining moment that you'd say: 'Yes, we thoroughly deserved it.' It's just been crazy."

Morgan added he has been in contact with his Black Caps counterpart Kane Williamson, who shares his disbelief at how the final panned out.

"I spoke to Kane [Williamson] over the last couple of days on numerous occasions and none of us has come up with a rational explanation as to the various times we gave them the game and they gave it back to us," Morgan added.

"Like me, he can't get his head around everything."

Former New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum, meanwhile, has no doubt the Black Caps - also runners up in the 2015 World Cup - will bounce back from the result, despite being "broken" at the moment.

"That's the thing and it's going to be so difficult for those guys," McCullum told stuff.co.nz. "I was lucky enough to have a beer with them in the changing room and they were pretty broken, that's for sure.

"They were also really proud of what they did and how well they played. Over the coming months and years, whilst it's still raw now, they'll understand just how magnificent that spectacle was.

"And for it to happen on the biggest of stages, to have played the hand that they played in that match is absolutely amazing."

England's Cricket World Cup winning captain Eoin Morgan will play for the Dublin Chiefs in the inaugural Euro T20 Slam.

Ireland-born Morgan was on Friday drafted as Dublin's 'icon player' and will lead the side in the first continent-based T20 league.

The Chiefs also pulled off the big signing of Babar Azam, the top-ranked batsman in the world in the shortest format, and his Pakistan team-mate Mohammad Amir.

Afghanistan's new captain Rashid Khan was picked up by the Rotterdam Rhinos at the draft in London.

Vastly experienced duo Imran Tahir and Shane Watson will be team-mates for the Amsterdam Knights.

All-rounders Shahid Afridi and JP Duminy will represent Belfast Titans, while Glasgow Giants snared Brendon McCullum and Dale Steyn.

The six-team competition runs from August 30 until September 22.

Andrew Strauss believes Eoin Morgan will need to take time to consider his future as England's one-day captain in the wake of their Cricket World Cup triumph.

Having been appointed as skipper shortly before a shambolic 2015 World Cup for England, Morgan has overseen a stunning turnaround in fortunes that culminated with Sunday's dramatic final victory over New Zealand at Lord's.

A day on from that win, outgoing head coach Trevor Bayliss backed the middle-order batsman to lead the team in next year's ICC T20 World Cup, which will take place in Australia.

Former England captain Strauss feels much will depend on whether Morgan - an ex-team-mate of his at Middlesex, as well as at international level - has the motivation to continue after achieving his primary goal.

Strauss, who also served as managing director of England Cricket before stepping down in 2018, told Sky Sports: "There is no doubt that if he wants to carry on then he will have incredible support from his team-mates, from the ECB and from the nation.

"All he needs to do is reflect and think about what's next for him and what's his motivation and drive and desire.

"If he has got that motivation then 100 per cent carry on but if he hasn't then pause for thought, because the only reason that we won the World Cup is because he was so committed to what happened on Sunday. If that commitment is not there then it is a time for him to think."

Trevor Bayliss expects Eoin Morgan to want to lead England into next year's T20 World Cup amid discussion over whether he will remain as captain following their dramatic 50-over World Cup triumph at Lord's on Sunday.

England lifted the trophy for the first time as they claimed an incredible win over New Zealand, prevailing on number of boundaries after the scores finished tied following each side's 50 overs and then a Super Over.

The successful end to England's four-year journey to world supremacy on the ODI stage, the vision for which was laid out by Morgan after their humiliating 2015 campaign, has led to talk of the Irish-born batsman possibly stepping down as skipper.

However, Bayliss, for whom the victory marked his final white-ball game in charge, believes Morgan will want to stay on and try to guide England to another world title in Australia.

As England continued their celebrations at The Oval on Monday, Bayliss said: "There is a T20 World Cup coming up in 12 months which I am sure he will be more than up for. [But] that will be an individual decision for him.

"Morgs is the leader of not just the guys in the team but off the field as well. He is the one who has really driven this forward.

"I think the rest of the boys try and run through a brick wall for him and the effort that Ben Stokes put in yesterday was just an example of that."

Bayliss was not fully convinced he could bring England's dismal record at World Cups to an end when he was appointed four years ago, but the Australian will leave his post after the Ashes vindicated for a steadfast commitment to aggressive and positive cricket.

"I wasn't sure [when I started] but it was certainly a country with a long history of cricket and I knew that they desperately wanted to do better than they had been doing," Bayliss added. "[I was told] no stone would be left unturned in an effort to get that World Cup.

"It's justification for how we went about it for the last four years. At different times we have copped a bit of criticism but we had an end goal in mind and this is the result."

Ashley Giles hailed the roles of Eoin Morgan and Trevor Bayliss in England's Cricket World Cup win, adding he is in no rush to discuss the captain's future or to decide on the next head coach.

Skipper Morgan led hosts England to their first World Cup success after a dramatic final at Lord's on Sunday, with Bayliss watching on as he prepares to leave his role as coach following the upcoming Ashes series.

Morgan, now 32, is likely to be questioned on his plans going forward, yet Giles is giving nothing away.

And the director of cricket is also willing to be patient in appointing Bayliss' successor, keen not to distract from the Ashes against Australia, starting on August 1.

"We've not got to [discussions with Morgan] quite yet, but Eoin's been a brilliant leader of this team," Giles told Sky Sports.

"He was a crucial part of the turnaround in our white-ball form - as was Trevor Bayliss and Andrew Strauss. We'll wait to talk about that.

"For us, we move on very quickly - we have Ashes camp starting at the weekend. Hopefully we can get the boys home and get them some rest.

"Trevor was brought in specifically really for his knowledge of white-ball cricket, with that being his strength area. He's done a great job.

"Most of the time, he's horizontal, extremely laid back, and sets the right environment in the dressing room. I'm chuffed for him. That partnership with Eoin Morgan has been fundamental to us getting to this point.

"The same applies as before [with Bayliss' future]. We're going to wait until after the Ashes for any process.

"There's a lot of noise anyway - here and through the Ashes, too - so if we have to go to the winter with someone who's just a stand-in for the time being, we'll do that. We'll run a full process after the Ashes is completed."

Eoin Morgan hailed Ben Stokes as "superhuman" after he inspired England to Cricket World Cup glory in an astonishing final against New Zealand at Lord's.

Stokes rescued the hosts with a mature innings of 84 not out, putting on 110 for the fifth wicket with Jos Buttler (59), as England reached 241 all out to force a Super Over after the Black Caps had posted 241-8.

All-rounder Stokes then struck eight of England's 15 runs in the Super Over and was rewarded when New Zealand matched England's tally, but were beaten having scored fewer boundaries.

England were crowned champions in the most dramatic fashion, Martin Guptill run out by a combination of Jason Roy and Buttler when going for a second run off the last ball of Jofra Archer's extra over.

Stokes was left shell-shocked after Carlos Brathwaite took him apart in the last over to win the 2016 World Twenty20 title in India, while just 11 months ago he was cleared of affray following an incident in Bristol.

The New Zealand-born 28-year-old was the hero on Sunday, and skipper Morgan saluted the former vice-captain, who scored over 400 runs in a glorious tournament.

Morgan said: "To come through it is extraordinary. He's almost superhuman. He has really carried the team and our batting line-up.

"I know Jos and his partnership was extraordinary, but to bat with the lower order the way he did I thought was incredible.

"The atmosphere, the emotion that was going through the whole game, he managed to deal with that in an extremely experienced manner. And obviously everybody watching at home will hopefully try and be the next Ben Stokes."

Morgan added: "I have said this a number of times about Ben, I think a lot of careers would have been ended after what happened in Kolkata. Ben on numerous occasions has stood up individually and in a unit for us.

"He leads the way in training, in any team meetings we have, and he's an incredible cricketer. And today he's had a huge day out and obviously we are thankful for that."

Joe Root felt it was "written in the stars" for Ben Stokes to be England's Cricket World Cup saviour as the hosts edged an epic final against New Zealand by virtue of a superior boundary count.

Stokes' excellent 84 not out saw England equal the Black Caps' 241 at Lord's on Sunday, while there was still no separating the sides after the match went to a Super Over.

Alongside Jos Buttler, Stokes managed 15 for his team from the additional six balls and when Martin Guptill was run out coming back for a second off the final delivery of New Zealand's over, the home side triumphed having struck more fours and sixes.

It was redemption for man-of-the-match Stokes, who was smashed for four successive maximums by West Indies' Carlos Brathwaite in the last over of the World Twenty20 final three years ago.

"Unbelievable. Wow. Hard to sum it up. What a day, what a tournament," Root said.

"Everyone has done what's been asked of them, we've come through difficult periods, held it together and performed under pressure.

"It was written in the stars for Ben, he's been through such a tough time, I'm so happy for him, I couldn't be more proud and pleased for him in particular."

England captain Eoin Morgan, meanwhile, was thrilled to see four years of planning come to fruition after his side were dumped out in the group stage in 2015 – an elimination that prompted a complete overhaul of the team's white-ball philosophy.

"There wasn't a lot in that game - commiserations to Kane [Williamson] and his team, the way they play their cricket is really worth aspiring to and the example they lead is hugely commendable," Morgan said.

"It's been a four-year journey, we've developed a lot particularly in the last two years, we find it hard on wickets like that, like all good teams do. Sport's tough at times but to get over the line today means the world.

"I was being cooled down by Liam Plunkett, which isn't a good sign.

"The guys in the middle kept us cool, they're very experienced, the best in the world, it's calming at times, there's not a lot between the teams, so we're delighted to lift the trophy today."

New Zealand won the toss and chose to bat first in the Cricket World Cup final at Lord’s as both sides look to land the trophy for the first time.

A wet start in London saw the pitch covered early in the morning before showers passed to avert the danger of a significant delay.

The toss and start of play were nudged back by a quarter of an hour to 10:15 local time (09:15GMT) and 10:45 (09:45GMT) respectively.

Tournament hosts England, led by Eoin Morgan, are unchanged from their semi-final victory over Australia, and New Zealand also made no alterations to the side that saw off India.

This is a first Cricket World Cup final for England since 1992, when Graham Gooch’s team lost to Imran Khan’s Pakistan.

For New Zealand it was a chance to go one better than four years ago when they suffered a seven-wicket thumping at the hands of fellow tournament co-hosts Australia.

There are five survivors from that match lining up against England, with Martin Guptill keeping his place despite making five single-figure scores in his past seven innings. The opener is joined by skipper Kane Williamson, Ross Taylor, Matt Henry and Trent Boult.

Williamson backed Guptill to come good and said it would be "incredibly special" for New Zealand to win the trophy.

"But before those potential thoughts it's about playing some good cricket," he said.

England captain Morgan said he was not unhappy with the outcome of the toss.

"No, not at all. It was a bit of a 50-50 call. It's always difficult here at Lord's. With the overheads we were probably leaning towards a bowl but it doesn't really bother me," Morgan said on Sky Sports.

"Whichever side plays well will lift the trophy at the end of the day.

"It's a big challenge for us playing against an in-form New Zealand side."

Page 1 of 3
© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.