David Warner never believed he was "losing it " as a batsman during his miserable Ashes series.

The Australia opener etched his name into the history books on Saturday as he struck an unbeaten 335 in the second Test against Pakistan at the Adelaide Oval.

In the process he became the seventh Australian to record a triple-century and overtook the highest score by the great Don Bradman (334) with an incredible innings that featured 39 fours and a six.

Only Matthew Hayden stands above Warner on the list of highest Test scores by an Australian, with his Herculean effort coming after an away Ashes series in which he surpassed single figures just twice.

Asked in a media conference if he ever felt he was losing it during his miserable run in England, an amused Warner replied: "Nah, never, never losing it. What kind of question is that?

"At the end of the day, you're going to have people who doubt you and, to be honest, through that whole campaign in that series, I always said I wasn't out of form, I was out of runs.

"I say this, not just in hindsight, but if I had my time again, I would have not changed my guard, I wouldn't have listened to some external noises, I would have backed myself more and batted where I have been here, outside off, leaving the ball patiently, getting my bat and pad closer together and under my nose. And I am capable of that.

"I just think in England you can get caught up in playing too much in front, especially with the way that I play. So I've had to regroup coming back from England.

"I've probably hit over three and a half to four thousand balls in the nets leading into Brisbane. And obviously here as well I've batted for a good two hours per session. It's not by chance that I've actually tightened all that up. I've actually been working really hard in the nets.

"Look, I've never doubted myself at all. It's one of those things where I'm a very confident person. Whether or not I'd scored these runs or didn't score my runs, I'd still hold my head up high and have that little smirk on my face that I always have."

Despite his historic performance, Warner still indicated he can still make improvements in terms of his focus at the crease.

"I think the last two Tests, I said in the last press conference it's probably the best I've ever batted, the most disciplined I've ever batted and the most patient I've ever batted," he added. 

"I just felt at ease, especially batting with Marnus [Labuschagne]. We were really talking about the game and I think sometimes I get carried away with talking about where I'm looking to score instead of what the bowler is actually doing and how he's trying to get me out.

"I think that will stay in the back of my mind now moving forward."

David Warner recorded the second-highest score in Australia Test history, compiling an incredible 335 not out during a remarkable day on which a series victory over Pakistan was all but secured.

Opener Warner, who made 154 in Australia's dominant victory in the series opener, surpassed Don Bradman's highest Test score by a single run in an historic performance on day two of the second rubber.

His herculean effort marked the largest individual Test score at the Adelaide Oval and lifted Australia to 589-3 declared before Pakistan quickly crumbled in response.

Save for the admirable efforts of Babar Azam (43 not out), the tourists provided precious little resistance and closed on 96-6, meaning anything other than an Australia victory in the match and the series is near impossible.

Australia had reached stumps on day one on 302-1, with Warner unbeaten on 166 and Marnus Labuschagne 126 not out.

Labuschagne added 36 more to his tally before being bowled by Shaheen Shah Afridi, but it proved a false dawn for those hoping for a Pakistan fightback.

Four balls after Labuschagne's departure, Warner brought up his double hundred by working a single to the leg side, and he continued in irrepressible form, ruthlessly taking advantage of a Pakistan attack that failed to harness any life or bounce from the surface.

Warner did receive a reprieve when he sliced to gully on 234, only for the delivery to be ruled a no-ball as Muhammad Musa overstepped his mark.

Steve Smith also made history by reaching 7,000 Test runs in his 126th Test innings, five fewer than previous record-holder Wally Hammond.

He fell for 36, but Pakistan never crafted another opportunity to end Warner's innings, which encompassed 39 fours and one maximum.

Warner, now supported by Matthew Wade (38 not out) became the seventh Australian to join the 300 club as he pulled a Mohammad Abbas short ball wide of mid-on for four.

He ran off leaping into the air in celebration and more history was to come for the left-hander, who surpassed 334 - the highest Test score achieved by the great Don Bradman - with a single by driving to sweeper cover.

Captain Tim Paine promptly declared, with Warner bowing the crowd as he took in their acclaim, and those privileged to be at the Adelaide Oval were given plenty more to celebrate as the tourists wilted in the face of the Australia attack.

Imam-ul-Haq went in the fifth over to Mitchell Starc, who did the majority of the damage with the ball by taking 4-22. Babar was the only Pakistan batsman to display any kind of composure and his team-mates' inexplicable tendency to chase wide deliveries gave Starc the wickets of Iftikhar Ahmed and Mohammad Rizwan in the same over.

Six wickets down, Pakistan faced the ignominy of being bowled out before the close. They avoided doing so, but a tour in which they have failed to win a single match will surely end in a massive defeat after Warner etched his name into the history books.

David Warner became just the seventh Australian to make a triple-century in Tests as the opener continued to dominate Pakistan on Saturday.

The left-hander reached 300 on day two of the second Test at the Adelaide Oval thanks to his 37th four.

Warner joined Donald Bradman (twice), Bob Simpson, Bob Cowper, Mark Taylor, Matthew Hayden and Michael Clarke as Australians to reach the milestone.

It was the first time an Australia batsman had made 300 since January 2012, when Clarke achieved the feat against India in Sydney.

Warner finished with an unbeaten 335 as Australia declared at 589-3.

Marnus Labuschagne could scarcely believe how well Australia's day against Pakistan went as he and David Warner posted both centuries to leave them firmly on top in the second Test.

Warner and Labuschagne each recorded hundreds in the first Test, when Australia won by an innings and five runs, and the two continued their fine form with an unbeaten second-wicket stand of 294 in Adelaide on Friday.

That partnership - already the highest in day-night Tests - meant Australia reached stumps at 302-1 as Warner ended the day unbeaten on 166 while Labuschagne was not out on 126.

The latter had made a career-best 185 in the opening match of the series and was pinching himself after making his second career hundred in his very next innings.

"It's a bit surreal," he said in his on-pitch interview as he walked off with Warner.

"It's just amazing to be out here with Davey and put on a big partnership. Really happy with that.

"We were running hard, [I] almost ran myself out there at the end.

"I love the intensity at the crease and how hard we ran. It was real fun."

Warner, who reached three figures for the 23rd time in his Test career, was delighted to see Australia's number three extend his purple patch.

Labuschagne has so far scored 793 Test runs in 2019, more than any other batsman in the world.

"His knock up at Queensland was outstanding," Warner added.

"Credit to him, he started where he left off at the Gabba."

David Warner and Marnus Labuschagne each posted centuries once more as Australia dominated Pakistan on day one of the second Test.

The hosts triumphed by an innings and five runs in the first contest in Brisbane - when Warner made 154 on his first home Test since serving a 12-month ban for the sandpaper scandal - and the opener posted his 23rd hundred in the longest format at Adelaide.

Labuschagne's purple patch continued too, the Australia number three following up his Test-best 185 last time out by reaching stumps unbeaten on 126 having made an unbroken 294 alongside Warner (166 not out).

The duo ensured Australia ended the first day 302-1, with Pakistan unable to build on an early breakthrough on another chastening day.

The home side won the toss on Friday but lost Joe Burns for four in the fourth over after Shaheen Afridi got one to shape back and drew the opener's edge.

Yet that was as good as it got for the tourists, Warner feasting on some hospitable bowling outside off to get Australia going.

Test debutant Muhammad Musa was dispatched for successive fours and then bowled an eight-ball over that went for 13 before rain forced an early tea with the home side 70-1.

Upon the resumption, Warner soon reached his half-century thanks to overthrows and it was not long before Labuschagne joined him in bringing up that milestone.

Warner converted his into three figures by scampering through for a single off Yasir Shah - his 10th hundred on the first day of Tests - and Pakistan's misery continued when Afridi accidentally kicked the ball to the fence.

Labuschagne, on 94, tried to reach a century with a heave down the ground off Yasir and though the ball bounced just before the rope, he made it back-to-back hundreds off the very next ball.

The two continued to pile on the runs and moved past Alastair Cook and Joe Root's 248 for the highest partnership in day-night Tests.

Yasir's desperate lbw appeal against Warner was struck down as a review showed a clear inside edge.

The opener cracked the same bowler for his 18th boundary to reach 150 and added another as Australia moved past 300 prior to stumps on a successful day for the hosts.

Tim Paine hopes Australia continue with the tradition of playing their first home Test at the Gabba after a crushing victory over Pakistan at the venue - provided they get Virat Kohli's permission.

A fine century from the brilliant Babar Azam was not enough to prevent Pakistan slipping to an innings defeat on Sunday, the tourists bowled out for 335 in their second innings.

The result stretches Australia's unbeaten run at the venue to 31 Tests – the last visiting team to triumph in Brisbane was West Indies in 1988 – and puts them 1-0 up in the two-match series.

However, captain Paine is unsure if they will be starting at the Gabba again next year, cheekily suggesting the potential schedule for the four-Test series against India is yet to receive the approval of counterpart Kohli.

Asked if he would like to start against India at the same venue, the wicketkeeper replied: "We'll certainly try. We will have to run that by Virat, but we will get an answer from him at some stage, I'm sure.

"That’s where we like to start our summer, as has been the case for a long, long time.

"As I said, we will ask Virat and see if we can get his permission to play here – maybe even get a pink-ball Test if he's in a good mood. We will have to wait and see."

Paine added: "We like to start here against anyone. Having said that, it [the venue] doesn't win games of cricket. The reason we win games of cricket at the Gabba is because we outplay our opposition."

Australia certainly outplayed Pakistan, aided by a new-look top three all contributing big scores.

David Warner returned to form after a lean Ashes tour with 154, while opening partner Joe Burns fell narrowly short of reaching three figures, making 97 after being recalled to the top of the order.

There was also a maiden Test ton for number three Marnus Labuschagne, who was named man of the match for his 185 that helped the hosts post 580 all out in their solitary innings in the contest.

While refusing to get too carried away by the early success, Paine hopes Australia have now settled on their batting line-up in the longest format.

"We've known Burnsy is a quality opening batsman for some time, it's great to have him back in the side," he said. "He's got a great combination happening with David.

"Marnus was given some opportunities 18 months ago when some people thought he should not, but the selectors saw the talent he had, and he's taken the experience he got then from Test cricket, gone to England and got even better, come home and looks like he got better again.

"We're really happy with the top three in this game. One innings doesn't make a summer, but happy with the positive signs we saw."

Australia and Pakistan conclude the series with a day-night Test in Adelaide, which begins on Friday.

David Warner insists pressure was never an issue for him despite admitting the Ashes had been a "failure".

The often explosive batsman showed his talent on the second day of Australia's first Test with Pakistan, closing on 151 not out as the hosts reached 312-1 to lead by 72 runs at the Gabba. 

It was a remarkable knock from a man who managed just 95 runs in the Test series against England, where Stuart Broad proved his nemesis. 

But even in the wake of that torrid time, Warner claims he never lost faith in his own ability. 

"I don't feel under pressure at all," he said after posting his 22nd Test century. "For me it's about going out there and backing my ability. 

"If you get selected or don't get selected you've got to accept that. The Ashes for me was a failure but I know what I'm capable of doing.

"I was on the end of a great series by a very good bowler. There was nothing more I could do. I wasn't out of form, I was out of runs. 

"Today I had a little bit of luck. That's what you need in the game. Over there I didn't have much luck at all."

Warner endured some tough treatment in England, and not just from Broad, as the home fans were not shy in reminding him of his involvement in the ball-tampering scandal.

That indiscretion led to a 12-month ban from the sport and Warner used that time to remind himself what matters most.

"To have that time off and the time to reflect, and just get away from the game ... there is a lot more to life than just cricket," he said.

"I really just loved the time I spent home with my family. You don't get that when you're travelling all the time. I really enjoyed that time off.

"Obviously I'm back now and I've got to keep working hard and keep being respectful of the game because it can bite you on the backside very fast."

David Warner hit an unbeaten century as Australia piled on the pain for Pakistan on day two of the first Test in Brisbane.

Warner posted his 22nd Test ton and fourth against Pakistan in a star display at the Gabba, where his 151 not out led Australia to 312-1 – a lead of 72 runs.

Australia star Warner had not reached triple figures in the longest form of the game since the 2017 Boxing Day Test against England – a one-year suspension for his role in the ball-tampering scandal derailing the batsman.

But Warner – who only managed 95 runs during a forgettable Ashes series in England – ended his wait for a hundred in the final session of the day after 180 deliveries.

Joe Burns was the only batsman to fall on the second day as Australia dominated – the opener falling three runs shy of a century after trying to sweep Yasir Shah (1-101).

After Pakistan were dismissed for 240 on Thursday, Warner and Burns took to the crease in warm conditions against the tourists, and they showed their prowess atop the order.

Warner survived a life on 56, when 16-year-old debutant Naseem Shah (0-65) thought he had his first international wicket, but the teenager heartbreakingly overstepped for a no-ball and the Australian was called back.

He also came close to being run out on 93, but Warner managed to make it back to his crease by centimetres, before completing a memorable ton after tea.

Warner and Burns combined for 222 until the latter was sent back to the pavilion.

Marnus Labuschagne (55 not out) was also spared late in the day when Haris Sohail's delivery flew past Asad Shafiq, while Warner's stump was hit by Shaheen Afridi (0-44) but the bails did not fall – capping a long and forgettable day for Pakistan.

Ben Stokes' claims that comments from David Warner helped fuel his Headingley heroics during the Ashes are just a way to "spike book sales", according to Australia captain Tim Paine.

England all-rounder Stokes played a knock for the ages in the third Ashes Test to salvage an unlikely victory after the hosts were bowled out for 67 in the first innings, delaying Australia's retaining of the urn until the fourth match at Old Trafford.

Recalling the events of the day in his new book 'On Fire', Stokes suggested some choice words from Warner, playing a first Test series after being banned for his role in the Newlands ball-tampering scandal, focused his mind.

But Paine believes Stokes' version of events is merely a ploy to shift books off the shelves.

"I was obviously standing next to David the whole time and you are allowed to talk on the cricket field," Paine said.

"But by no means was he abusing him or sledging him. It just seems to be a common trend in England that they like to use Davey's name to spike book sales. So good luck to them."

In the book, Stokes claimed he would have accepted sledging from any other player.

"I had extra personal motivation due to some things that were said to me out on the field on the evening of day three when I was trying to get through to stumps," Stokes wrote. 

"A few of the Aussies were being quite chirpy, but in particular David Warner seemed to have his heart set on disrupting me.

"He just wouldn't shut up for most of my time out there. I could accept it from just about any other opponent. Truly. Not from him, though. 

"The changed man he was adamant he'd become, the one that hardly said boo to a goose and even went as far as claiming he had been re-nicknamed 'Humble' by his Australia team-mates, had disappeared. 

"Maybe his lack of form in his new guise had persuaded him that he needed to get the bull back?"

However, Paine said Warner deserved credit for the way he dealt with the taunts from the home crowd in England.

"I was standing right next to him, I had absolutely no issue," Paine added. "The way David handled himself during the Ashes was excellent. 

"Particularly given the fact he wasn't scoring a hell of a lot of runs and I'm pretty sure he was on the end of a fair bit himself on and off the field in England. 

"So, I thought he did a great job of handling that and held himself really well throughout the series. They write books to sell and they have to get headlines to get sales."

Peerless David Warner concluded a dominant Twenty20 series with another half-century as Australia made it three wins from three with a seven-wicket defeat of much-improved tourists Sri Lanka.

Australia clinched the series after just two matches following a pair of dismal Sri Lanka showings, before the 3-0 whitewash was sealed on Friday in more testing circumstances.

Sri Lanka had failed to reach three figures in the opener as their hosts celebrated a record win, before their batting effort in a nine-wicket second reverse was condemned as "unacceptable" by coach Rumesh Ratnayake.

A total of 142-6 at the MCG was therefore encouraging, with Kusal Perera top-scoring by making 57 - his side's first fifty of the series.

Yet that tally was still never likely to be enough to stop an Australia outfit powered by the resurgent Warner, who followed up knocks of 100 not out and 60no with an unbeaten 57, completing the chase on 145-3 with 14 balls to spare.

Playing for his country for the first time since a dismal Ashes series with the bat, Warner led the way in all three matches without losing a wicket on his return to a shorter format, with T20s and Tests against Pakistan now next up later this month.

It had appeared Sri Lanka might be set for further humiliation when Niroshan Dickwella departed for a golden duck in the first over, but Kusal Mendis (13) and Perera steadied the ship.

Ben McDermott had taken a simple catch for the breakthrough off Mitchell Starc's (2-32) bowling, and the next two wickets - Kane Richardson (2-25) removing Mendis, and Pat Cummins (2-23) prising out Avishka Fernando (20) - also landed kindly in the lap of the Tasmania star.

Yet Sri Lanka still did not crumble, thanks largely to Perera, who responded in a partnership with Oshada Fernando that plundered 23 off 14.

Cummins finally got rid of Perera, directing to extra cover, in the 17th over, but some solid late work from Bhanuka Rajapaksa (17 no) carried the visitors to a respectable if ultimately uncompetitive score.

Aaron Finch recovered from his first-ball exit in the second match to do the early heavy lifting with the bat for Australia, making 37 off 25 before Lahiru Kumara intervened.

The Warner-Steve Smith partnership that sped the Aussies to victory last time out was less effective on this occasion - the latter going for 13 - but the in-form opener kept to his task.

Warner found another effective partner in Ashton Turner (22 off 15), although the former might have departed when the ball dropped onto his stumps and the bails stayed on.

That let-off allowed the T20 specialist to reach his half-century and then fittingly clinch victory with a four.

Sri Lanka assistant coach Rumesh Ratnayake was "gutted" after another poor batting performance proved costly against Australia in a Twenty20 international.

Chasing 234 to win the series opener in Adelaide, Sri Lanka were restricted to 99-9 last Sunday.

And another one-sided contest played out in Brisbane on Wednesday, as the tourists were bowled out for 117 with one over to spare.

Just two Sri Lanka batsmen passed 20 as quicks Billy Stanlake and Pat Cummins and spinners Ashton Agar and Adam Zampa took two wickets each.

Australia then chased down a victory target of 118 in 13 overs, with David Warner (60 not out) and Steve Smith (53 not out) guiding their side to a convincing nine-wicket win.

"Disappointed is ... I think it's too nice a word," Ratnayake told reporters, with Australia now holding an unbeatable 2-0 series lead with one to play.

"I'm gutted, really. The boys are gutted. But [it is] unacceptable because the way we batted ... [it was] as if we, at times, we thought we were going to be all out in the 12th over or so.

"We are going to rectify it. We are going to sort of revisit [it] in our meetings and see what went wrong. It is intent which I feel was not there."

Sri Lanka entered the three-match series in Australia fresh off a 3-0 whitewash of world number one side Pakistan.

Making that triumph even better was the fact it came in Pakistan, but Sri Lanka have struggled on the fast, bouncy Australian pitches.

Ratnayake said it was a priority to correct that ahead of next year's T20 World Cup, to be played in Australia from October to November.

"Our preparation needs to be much more ... it needs to have at least a period of six weeks," he said.

"We came directly - virtually directly from Pakistan. The sub-continent wickets are different from these ... no excuses though.

"Adaptation was the thing which we did not do in the past two matches."

Australia paceman Stanlake was pleased with his night's work but preferred to talk up former Test captain Smith, who caught the eye with a terrific half-century.

"It's exciting for us. I think it's exciting for the public as well, just to watch him play T20 cricket," Stanlake said.

"Obviously, they don't get to see him do that too much.

"But yeah, he is an absolute class player, you saw how he good was tonight, again. He does it in all formats and hopefully we can see him doing it often."

The three-match Twenty20 international series concludes in Melbourne on Friday.

David Warner and Steve Smith each produced unbeaten half-centuries as Australia breezed to a nine-wicket victory over Sri Lanka and secured a Twenty20 series win.

Australia enjoyed a record margin of victory in the opening contest of the three-match series, triumphing by 134 runs, and it quickly became apparent matters would be similarly straightforward at the Gabba.

Sri Lanka batted first and could not see out the 20 overs as they were all out for 117 with Kusal Perera top-scoring on a measly 27.

Captain Aaron Finch's first-ball dismissal for the hosts was then as good as it got for Sri Lanka with the ball, as Smith joined Warner for a straightforward chase, which was completed with seven overs still remaining.

The opener made 60 and Smith added 53 as Australia (118-1) clinched the series with a match to spare, ahead of surely more taxing T20 and Test outings against Pakistan next month.

Sri Lanka did not help themselves after winning the toss and electing to bat, with a terrible mix-up seeing Kusal Mendis run out in just the second over.

Australia never ceded control and shared the wickets around as Ashton Agar (2-27) accounted for the potentially dangerous duo of Avishka Fernando (17) and Perera.

Alex Carey was busy behind the wicket, stumping both Wanindu Hasaranga and Lasith Malinga off the bowling of Adam Zampa (2-20).

Billy Stanlake took 2-23 and Pat Cummins 2-29, before the latter ran out Lakshan Sandakan to bring another dismal Sri Lanka innings to a close.

Opening bowler Malinga then gave the tourists brief hope as Finch was caught down the leg side by Perera, though that wicket merely brought Smith to the crease.

An unbroken partnership of 117 was speedy enough without being truly explosive, with 15 fours - four of them in the fifth over alone - but no maximums between Warner and Smith.

Sandakan made a mess of a late attempted run-out of Smith, and Australia had seven overs to spare when Hasaranga bowled a wide past Warner to complete a simple chase.

David Warner said the support he received from Australia fans was music to his ears as he marked his birthday by scoring a maiden Twenty20 International century in a hammering of Sri Lanka.

Warner must have had jeers ringing in his ears when he returned home after spectators in England let him know what they thought about his part in the Newlands ball-tampering scandal.

The opening batsman was subjected to boos and verbals from crowds during the Cricket World Cup and a drawn Ashes series after making his comeback from a one-year suspension.

Warner endured a miserable Ashes series with the bat but scored a hundred in New South Wales' Sheffield Shied opener this month and plundered 100 not out in the first match of the T20 series against Sri Lanka on Sunday.

The left-hander expressed his gratitude to the Adelaide Oval crowd after he smashed the Sri Lanka attack to all parts in a 134-run drubbing - Australia's biggest by runs in a T20 - on his 33rd birthday.

"It's always fantastic to get that [support]. You sort of sit back and watch highlights of other people's packages and stuff, you forget how much it actually drives you when you're out there," said the former Australia vice-captain.

"We love the people's support and we love the Australian crowds coming out and supporting us and we always try and put on a show for them.

"But I don't think they actually realise how much impact it has on us players while we are out there. I remember when I was supporting the [Sydney] Roosters in the [NRL] Grand Final this year.

"When you've got that support behind the team or when you're supporting someone else, it's a massive boost, the confidence for us and for the other people out there playing."

Warner said there was no other ground he would rather have been playing at in his first home international since returning from his ban.

"Emotions were great. Another year older. Another game for Australia and coming out here in front of an Adelaide crowd," he added.

"There's no better place to play, you know. You've always got a fantastic wicket; the curators are absolutely fantastic here. It's a batting paradise. I absolutely love it out here."

The tourists could only make 99-9 in reply to Australia's imposing 233-2, Adam Zampa taking 3-14.

David Warner marked his return to the international Twenty20 arena with a stunning maiden century as Australia eased past Sri Lanka by 134 runs in their opening game.

Warner was back in the T20 fold for the first time since the infamous ball-tampering saga, in which the star Australia batsman served a year-long suspension.

Having already made his Test and ODI comeback, birthday boy Warner capped his T20 return with an unbeaten hundred in his 71st appearance against touring Sri Lanka in Adelaide on Sunday.

Warner led Australia to a record-breaking victory, surpassing last year's 100-run win over Zimbabwe, and their highest T20 total on home soil – 233-2 – before hapless Sri Lanka only managed 99-9 in response at Adelaide Oval.

After a forgettable Ashes series in England which only yielded 95 runs across five matches, Warner was desperate to return to form as the Australian summer got underway.

Warner was back to his brilliant best on his 33rd birthday as the big-hitting star scored 100 runs from just 56 balls in game one of the three-match series against Sri Lanka – bringing up his ton from the last delivery of the innings.

The tone was set by Warner and captain Aaron Finch (64) after Sri Lanka opted to bowl first, with the opening pair combining for 122 runs from just 10.5 overs and reaching their half-centuries in the same over.

Finch and Warner smacked consecutive sixes from Kasun Rajitha – who finished with figures of 0-75 from four overs for the most expensive spell in T20 history – before the former was caught at deep midwicket off the bowling of Lakshan Sandakan (1-41).

Glenn Maxwell (62) then joined Warner at the crease as the duo put on 107 runs from just 52 balls, though Maxwell was dismissed by Dasun Shanaka (1-10) in the last over.

Sri Lanka made a nightmare start to their run chase after Kusal Mendis fell victim to Mitchell Starc (2-18) for a duck in the first over, before the visitors were left reeling at 13-3 in the four over as Pat Cummins (2-27) wreaked havoc.

Shanaka was Sri Lanka's highest score with 17 on putrid day for Sri Lanka, with spinner Adam Zampa (3-14) cleaning up the final three wickets, while Maxwell produced a stunning piece of fielding to run out Wanindu Hasaranga (5).

Rashid Khan entered the history books as the first player picked in the draft for the inaugural season of The Hundred, while Andre Russell was snapped up but Chris Gayle and Lasith Malinga went unsigned.

Afghanistan spinner Rashid, the ICC's top-ranked Twenty20 bowler, was selected in the top-tier £125,000 bracket by the Trent Rockets to join a team that also includes England Test captain Joe Root, Alex Hales and Australia big-hitter D'Arcy Short.

West Indies' electric all-rounder Andre Russell was the second man chosen and is bound for the Southern Brave, where Australia slogger David Warner and England's lightning paceman Jofra Archer are among his team-mates.

"I'm feeling good, I was nervous before, it's the first time being in the draft in this competition," Russell said. 

"I've got a lot to offer, a 100 ball [format] is definitely see ball, hit ball. I don't have to worry about my head [with Archer as a team-mate]. He's a great character. 

"I will try to just bowl faster than him."

Windies legend Gayle and veteran Sri Lanka quick Malinga will not be involved in the tournament, which starts in July next year, after their reserve prices were not met.

Welsh Fire selected world-class Australian quality with the menacing Mitchell Starc and superstar batsman Steve Smith joining England international Jonny Bairstow.

Northern Superchargers coach Darren Lehmann went with Australian familiarity by selecting Aaron Finch and Chris Lynn. 

Lehmann also chose Mujeeb Ur Rahman for a team that already has England's Cricket World Cup hero Ben Stokes.

Glenn Maxwell, Mohammad Nabi, Mohammad Amir and Mark Wood link up with Eoin Morgan – who skippered England to World Cup glory – at London Spirit, while classy New Zealand star Kane Williamson and Ravi Bopara are headed to the Birmingham Phoenix.

Manchester Originals landed Imran Tahir for their top-bracket selection, while Sunil Narine offers spin and top-order explosiveness for the Oval Invincibles.

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