Bangladesh won their first one-day tournament final as they put in a clinical batting display to beat West Indies in the tri-nation series at Malahide.

With West Indies' promising innings disrupted by rain, the match was cut to 24 overs per-side when play eventually resumed at 17:30 local time.

Shai Hope (74) and Sunil Ambris (69 not out) had been in the middle of an impressive partnership, but the break seemed to serve Bangladesh – without the injured Shakib Al Hasan – well, as they came out with renewed vigour.

Set a revised target of 210, Bangladesh stepped up the tempo with the bat – Soumya Sarkar (66) and Mosaddek Hossain (52no) both hitting half-centuries - as they reached their target with seven balls and five wickets remaining.

Put into bat, West Indies looked set to be heading for a high total before rain stopped play 20 overs into proceedings, Hope and Ambris having shared a century opening stand.

The Windies came back after a lengthy delay at 131-0, but lost Hope when he picked out Mosaddek off Mehidy Hasan’s bowling.

West Indies finished up on 152-1, but Bangladesh's target was upped based on the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern method.

Sarkar cruised to a half-century in 27 balls before succumbing to Raymon Reifer on 66, having hit nine fours and three sixes during his stint at the crease.

Sabbir Rahman's two-ball duck put the Windies in the ascendancy, but a measured 36 from Mushfiqur Rahim put Bangladesh back in contention.

Mosaddek took full advantage, smashing five sixes as he raced to 52 from just 24 balls before Mahmudullah hit a precise cover drive for four to secure a historic victory ahead of the Cricket World Cup.

Shakib Al Hasan retired hurt with a side injury during Bangladesh's comprehensive six-wicket win over Ireland in the one-day international tri-nation series in Dublin, raising concerns ahead of the Cricket World Cup.

The all-rounder was on 50 not out after 51 balls of his innings as Bangladesh chased 293 for victory, but decided he could not continue at the end of the 36th over in a concerning moment for his country with the World Cup only a fortnight away.

Shakib, who captains Bangladesh in the Test and T20I formats, had been seen holding his left side and received lengthy treatment from the physio in the previous over, as well as showing visible signs of pain after playing a pull shot following the treatment.

Without Shakib, Bangladesh reached their target with seven overs to spare to make it three straight wins in the tournament. 

Openers Liton Das and Tamim Iqbal both hit half-centuries with scores of 76 and 57 respectively, while Mahmudullah (35no) and Sabbir Rahman (7no) finished the job.

Their win came despite impressive efforts from Ireland stalwarts Paul Stirling and captain William Porterfield as Ireland reached 292-8 from their 50 overs.

Opener Stirling smashed his eighth ODI hundred in an innings of 130 that included eight fours and four maximums, while captain Porterfield added 94, the duo putting on 174 for the third wicket. 

But both men were removed by the impressive Abu Jayed, who recorded figures of 5-58 in only his second ODI appearance, and there were no other contributions of note from the hosts.

Bangladesh will play West Indies at Malahide in the final on Friday.

 

Mustafizur Rahman led a disciplined bowling display from Bangladesh in a five-wicket win over West Indies that ensured they will meet again in the Tri-Nation Series final.

Hosts Ireland were eliminated after the Tigers beat the Windies for the second time in the tournament in Malahide on Monday.

The in-form Shai Hope made 87 and captain Jason Holder 62, but West Indies could only post 247-9 after winning the toss.

Mustafizur was the pick of the bowlers, taking 4-43 with support from Mashrafe Mortaza (3-60), Shakib Al Hasan (1-27) and Mehidy Hasan (1-41).

Half-centuries from Mushfiqur Rahim (63) and Soumya Sarkar (54) set Bangladesh well on their way and Mahmudullah was unbeaten on 30 when they got home with 16 balls to spare.

Darren Bravo fell cheaply again and the Windies were 99-4 in the 24th over when captain Holder joined Hope at the crease.

The pair put on 100 for the fifth wicket to give West Indies a chance of posting a challenging total, Hope in great touch again before falling 13 short of a third century of the series. 

Holder soon followed after hitting a six and three fours, then Mustafizur snared Ashley Nurse and Raymon Reifer as West Indies failed to produce late fireworks.

Nurse (3-53) ended a 54-run opening stand by bowling Tamim Iqbal and struck for a third time to dismiss Sarkar, who cleared the ropes twice in an assured knock.

Mustafizur and Mohammad Mithun (43) put on 83 for the fourth wicket and Mahmudullah played with confidence before a wide from Sheldon Cottrell consigned the Windies to defeat.

Mustafizur Rahman and Mashrafe Mortaza have continued to pose problems for the Windies, restricting the visitors playing in the Walton Tri-Series to just 247-9 in their 50 overs earlier on Monday in Dublin Ireland. 

Windies skipper Jason Holder insists the team is determined to put on a much better display in the third One Day International (ODI) against Ireland on Saturday, following a disappointing performance against Bangladesh in the second game.

After getting off to a blazing start with a close to record total of 381 in the first match against Ireland, on the back of centuries from John Campbell and Shai Hope.  The follow-up effort against Bangladesh was far less impressive after the team was dismissed for 264, despite getting off to a solid start.  Holder, however, insisted the team would focus on getting back to basics at the crease.

“I thought we batted really well in the first game and the second game was a little bit tougher in terms of the pace of the wicket and trying to get runs flowing.  We have had a lot of discussions about how we could improve if we find ourselves back in that situation,” Holder said.

“We trying to get 300 plus runs on the board every time that we bat.  Having said that we were just a little bit off the ball in the last game.  This game we are just looking to so do a few things better and get to that 300 mark.”

Bangladesh overcame Shai Hope recording his third successive century against them as openers Tamim Iqbal and Soumya Sarkar's 144-run stand in Malahide laid the foundations for an eight-wicket win over West Indies.

Two days after he blasted 170 and made a record-breaking 365 alongside fellow opener John Campbell in a victory over Ireland, Hope (109) was in the mood again and scored his sixth hundred - half of which have come against Bangladesh - as the Windies made a bright start in reaching 205-2 in the 41st over.

Yet they lost seven wickets for just 56 more runs, Mashrafe Mortaza (3-49) accounting for three in five balls to help reduce West Indies to 261-9.

Bangladesh needed just 118 more by the time the alliance of Tamim (80) and Sarkar (73) was eventually broken up, and Shakib Al Hasan's run-a-ball 61 not out and Mushfiqur Rahim's unbeaten 32 saw them home with 30 deliveries to spare.

Campbell's back injury meant Hope had a new opening partner in Sunil Ambris, but the wicketkeeper-batsman provided an ominous sign by sending two of the first three balls he faced to the ropes.

Yet the Windies' momentum was halted when Mortaza made three swift breakthroughs, removing Roston Chase (51), Hope and captain Jason Holder, with the Windies tail unable to build on the work done by their in-form opener.

Tamim and Sarkar had got the required run rate down to fewer than five an over by the time the latter holed out to deep midwicket off Chase. 

And though Tamim fell 20 short of a 12th ODI century to leave Bangladesh at 196-2, Shakib and Mushfiqur knocked off the required runs with ease in the second match of the Tri-Nation Series.

West Indies assistant coach Roddy Estwick believes the coming tri-series against Ireland and Bangladesh presents an opportunity for the young players to gain experience and for the World-Cup bound players to get some useful match practice.

West Indies fast bowling legend and Bangladesh bowling coach Courtney Walsh has warned the team’s seamers to be wary of difficult conditions in England.

The Asian country will be one of 10 teams that take the field when the tournament gets under way on May 30.  Unlike drier conditions on the subcontinent, a cloudier atmosphere with more moisture in the air can cause the cricket ball to swing.

The bowling great believes doing well in different conditions will come down to discipline and use of intelligence.

  “It will be a big challenge,” Walsh said.

“There are going to be some good cricket pitches, which are batting-friendly. We have to be intelligent and try to execute well. We have to read the conditions and the surfaces we play. Some places the ball might swing more than the others. We have to assess when we get there,” he added.

Bangladesh will bowl off the tournament against South Africa on June 2nd at the Oval in London.

“Most of the pitches will be docile and flat. We have to work on our variations and execution,” he said. “Everybody studies one another these days. So they know our strengths and weaknesses. Likewise, we also know theirs.”

 

 

Bangladesh bowling coach, former West Indies pacer, wants one of his charges handled with care ahead of the International Cricket Council’s Cricket World Cup in England just weeks away. 

Uncapped seamer Abu Jayed has been named in Bangladesh's 15-man Cricket World Cup squad, yet there is no place for batsman Imrul Kayes.

Jayed has appeared in Twenty20 internationals and Tests for his nation and though he is yet to feature in a one-day international, the 25-year-old swing bowler has been included for the upcoming 50-over showpiece in England.

Mustafizur Rahman, who is battling an ankle problem, is also part of the squad, as are Mahmudullah (shoulder) and Rubel Hossain (side strain).

However, Imrul has once again been omitted having missed the recent ODI series with New Zealand, which Bangladesh lost 3-0.

Imrul, 32, averages over 32 in 78 ODIs for Bangladesh but will be missing when his country begin their World Cup campaign against South Africa on June 2.

There is a recall for Mosaddek Hossain, though, the middle-order batsman having not represented Bangladesh in an ODI since September 2018.

In addition to the 15 players named in the squad, Yasir Ali and Nayeem Hasan have been called up for the tri-series with Ireland and West Indies, which begins in May.

 

Bangladesh's World Cup squad: Mashrafe Mortaza (c), Liton Das, Mohammad Mithun, Mushfiqur Rahim, Mahmudullah, Shakib Al Hasan, Tamim Iqbal, Soumya Sarkar, Mohammad Saifuddin, Abu Jayed, Mustafizur Rahman, Rubel Hossain, Mehidy Hasan, Sabbir Rahman, Mosaddek Hossain.

New Zealand Cricket chief David White says "everything changes now" regarding team security in the country following the terror attack in Christchurch.

On Friday, 49 people were killed in the attack at a mosque near Hagley Oval, with the majority of the Bangladesh Test squad in a bus outside.

Team manager Khaled Mashud said the tourists were "very lucky" not to be caught up in the incident and their Test against New Zealand was subsequently cancelled.

Bangladesh returned home after the attack and, as New Zealand mourned, Black Caps CEO White acknowledged that it would impact how teams travel in future.

"This is shocking. This will change the entire fabric of international sports hosting," he said. "I think everything changes now.

"We'll certainly be having to look at our security in depth. I think the idea of New Zealand being a safe haven is gone now."

He added: "This isn't about cricket; it's about something much bigger and much more important than that. It's about life, it's about respect; it's about family and community.

"Cricket and sport take a back-seat to personal welfare."

Team manager Khaled Mashud said Bangladesh players and staff were "very lucky" to escape unharmed as they were "three or four minutes" away from being inside a mosque where a terror attack unfolded on Friday.

Mass shootings at two Christchurch mosques resulted in 49 people being killed and 48 injured.

Mashud revealed that the majority of the tourists' squad were inside a bus outside the Al Noor mosque while a massacre took place and saw "bloodstained people staggering out".

He is quoted as saying by ESPNcricinfo. "This was a kind of accident that we would never expect nor want in any part of the world.

"We are very lucky because we had a number of us, about 17 of us, in the bus. Soumya Sarkar was also there, and we were all heading to the mosque for prayers.

"Only two of the players [Liton Das and Nayeem Hasan, as well as spin-bowling coach Sunil Joshi] had stayed back in the hotel, and rest of the squad had gone there. We were very close to the mosque, and we could see from the bus. We must have been about 50 yards from the mosque.

"I would say we were really lucky. Had we reached even three or four minutes earlier, we probably would have been inside the mosque. This could then have been a massive incident.

"We are very thankful that we weren't caught in the crossfire, but what we saw was straight out of a movie scene. We could see bloodstained people staggering out of the mosque.

"Maybe in about eight-ten minutes, we were all inside the bus and were sitting with our heads bowed, just in case someone fires at us."

The third and final Test at Hagley Oval - which was due to start on Saturday - was called off following the attacks and the Bangladesh squad will fly home as soon as possible.

Mashud said the players and staff ran through Hagley Park to the ground after being allowed to get off the bus.

He added: "When we realised that the shooters could have inflicted more damage if they had found us inside the bus all at once, we took a collective decision to escape through the back gate.

"We ran or quickly walked out through that gate. Then we were in the dressing room, and the local liaison people explained to us how we could get out of there most safely to our hotel.

"It wasn't their fault, they tried their best according to whatever they are used to in their culture. Our players supported them a lot, with inputs on what was needed at that point of time.

"Our decision to get out was timely, because in videos we saw that people came out and kept shooting later."

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has backed the decision to call off the third Test between New Zealand and Bangladesh following the mass shootings in Christchurch.

Bangladesh players narrowly escaped one of the two terror attacks at mosques which resulted in multiple fatalities on Friday.

Tigers team manager Khaled Mashud said members of the team and staff were "about 50 yards" from one of the mosques where a massacre unfolded.

The Black Caps and the Tigers were due to start the third and final match of the series at Hagley Oval on Saturday, but it was agreed that the game will not go ahead and the tourists will fly home as soon as possible.

ICC chief executive David Richardson said: "Our thoughts and sincere condolences go out to the families and friends of those affected by this horrendous incident in Christchurch.

"Both teams, staff and match officials are safe and the ICC fully supports the decision to cancel the Test match."

The two remaining fixtures between the New Zealand Development team and Australia's Under-19 women's team that were due to take place at Lincoln's Bert Sutcliffe Oval this weekend have also been cancelled.

"We are shocked and appalled as I am sure all New Zealanders are,” New Zealand Cricket Chief Executive David White said.

"We are offering support to all those within the teams affected by the situation and are continuing to take advice from authorities on the ground."

 

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