Coronavirus: Cricket Australia braced for T20 World Cup postponement

By Sports Desk May 29, 2020

Cricket Australia (CA) is braced for a huge financial hit due to the possible postponement of the ICC Twenty20 World Cup, as well as playing home games without spectators. 

Speaking to the media on Friday, CA chief executive Kevin Roberts predicted the governing body stands to miss out on 80million Australian dollars due to the potential changes caused by the coronavirus pandemic. 

Admitting there is a “very high risk” of the global T20 tournament being pushed back from the original plan of October and November this year, Roberts outlined the expected missed income due to such a delay. 

However, the bigger blow is a home summer without any fans present at international fixtures, while there is also the extra cost of the biosecurity measures required to host opposing teams. 

"The likelihood of significant crowds is very slim - ordinarily that would deliver well over $50m revenue to CA," Roberts told reporters. 

"The T20 World Cup is a big question and that's a factor of perhaps $20m. We have been hopeful all along that it could be staged in October-November, but you would have to say there's a very high risk about the prospect of that happening. 

"And it's likely that our biosecurity measures that we need to put in place to deliver the season will cost in the order of $10m." 

Australia are due to host Zimbabwe in one-day internationals in August, then West Indies arrive for T20 games in October. As for Tests, Afghanistan are due to play one in Perth in November, followed by a four-match series against India, who complete their tour with three ODIs in January. 

New Zealand are the final visitors of a packed schedule, making the short trip for three one-dayers and a one-off T20 early next year. 

On the recently released schedule, Roberts remained cautiously optimistic, adding: “We're very optimistic that we will be able to stage the India men's tour and the other inbound tours for the season. 

"But we're realistic enough to know they will look very different to a normal summer. We have been forced to effectively plan for the worst and hope for the best." 

Related items

  • Langer: Australia must tour England 'for the health of world cricket' Langer: Australia must tour England 'for the health of world cricket'

    Australia coach Justin Langer believes his team must tour England if it is possible in 2020, as international cricket aims to get back on track after the impact of coronavirus.

    After a four-month break, Test cricket resumed on Wednesday with a rain-hit first day of England's behind-closed-doors match against West Indies in Southampton.

    Australia were due to tour England for a white-ball series starting on July 3, with new dates for the rescheduled trip yet to be confirmed.

    With the Twenty20 World Cup still due to be played in Australia in October, Langer believes the tour of England also has to be a priority.

    "I think we have to go to England. There's lots of challenges, of course, but we have to find solutions to make sure that can happen if possible," Langer told reporters.

    "That's my view. I think for the health of world cricket.

    "If things out of control happen and we can't end up going, at least we can say we've done everything in our power to make it happen."

    Langer also claimed Cricket Australia (CA) should be willing to let its star names – such as Steve Smith – play in the Indian Premier League (IPL), with preparation for the T20 World Cup vital.

    "I think we have to, talking frankly," said Langer, who would even let players leave if it meant them missing part of the domestic season in Australia.

    "I'll always look for win-win situations and hopefully we do that when we get some clarity on what's happening with the schedule."

    India will tour Australia later in 2020, with a four-Test series scheduled.

  • Coronavirus: Kawhi Leonard's arrival at Disney World delayed – reports Coronavirus: Kawhi Leonard's arrival at Disney World delayed – reports

    Los Angeles Clippers star Kawhi Leonard reportedly did not travel with his team-mates to Orlando for the NBA's season restart but is expected to arrive in a few days. 

    Leonard was reportedly not on the team flight to the Orlando area in Florida, where the 2019-20 campaign will resume at the Disney World complex after the season was halted in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    A two-time NBA Finals MVP, Leonard is believed to have an excused absence from the Clippers as he tends to a family matter. 

    The Clippers are scheduled to spend Thursday and Friday satisfying quarantine requirements and will play their first game on July 30 against rivals the Los Angeles Lakers in the second game of a re-opening doubleheader. 

    Leonard led the Clippers with 26.9 points, 7.3 rebounds and ranked second with 5.0 assists per game when the NBA season was put on hold amid the COVID-19 crisis.

    The Clippers are second in the Western Conference with a 44-20 record, five and a half games behind the Lakers.    

  • Still supporting Gayle-less Tallawahs Still supporting Gayle-less Tallawahs

    I’m a Chelsea fan.

    Now that is not a popular thing to be in my native Jamaica but I’ve been one since 1995, some 25 years ago.

    I was not a fan of what used to be English football and at the time, the only team in the Premier League with any international flavour was Chelsea.

    Chelsea boasted a squad with one English starter in Dennis Wise and were the only team in England that played with the type of flair I had grown up seeing from my father’s team of choice, Brazil.

    Arsenal had not yet become the free-flowing team it became popular for and Manchester United, though winners, were not a target of my fancy.

    But Chelsea, for all their beautiful football, were a mid-table team at best.

    When they started to win, courtesy of an injection of cash from Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich, they lost some of that flair.

    Players like Gianfranco Zola, Ruud Gullit and Gustavo Poyet were no longer there and Jose Mourinho had turned the team into something resembling a machine that built cars to exacting specifications. Still I delighted in their success. Now they’re losing again and cannot seem to compete with the might of the Manchester Cities and Liverpools of this era. They have returned to playing with some flair but I cannot be completely happy with all the changes they have made to date.

    But I will likely remain a Chelsea fan for the remainder of my time on this planet.

    The same is true of the Jamaica Tallawahs. I fell in love with the Tallawahs much, in the same way, I fell in love with Chelsea.

    I understood franchise cricket in much the same way I did club football and would have chosen any of the six teams in the CPL to be ‘mine’.

    But just as I became a fan of the way the dread-locked Gullit would marshall his midfield and later Zola would turn a game on its head with a moment of brilliance, I could not get enough of big-hitting innings from Chris Gayle.

    It was for this reason and this reason solely that I became a fan of the Tallawahs but I cannot now abandon them because, just as in club football, franchise cricket will witness changes.

    And there have been a myriad of changes to the Tallawahs since the start of the Hero Caribbean Premier League, some seven years ago.

    Now, there is no Chris Gayle, and the latest squad seems a far cry from the exciting days of the big left-hander smacking balls onto the roof of the North Stand at Kingston’s Sabina Park.

    Still, I will remain with the Tallawahs as any true fan of a team should.

    And maybe, despite the many changes, this Tallawahs line-up has a chance.

    They do have more balance than they have had in recent years.

    For a while, the Tallawahs batting was their strength but they had to bat teams out of games. Whenever they failed to get more than just a competitive score, they were certain to lose. In fact, I think they have the ignominy of sporting some of the highest losing totals in the competition's history.

    This year may be different.

    Fidel Edwards is an experienced fast bowler, who, along with the pace of Oshane Thomas, could pose some problems for their opposition in the league.

    The Tallawahs also have something they have been missing for a few years now as well. An incisive spinner. Tabraiz Shamsi is the type of slow bowler the Tallawahs may just need. A left-arm wrist spinner, Shamsi is aggressive, with his 19.8 strike rate suggesting he will take wickets in the middle overs where the Tallawahs have been found wanting over the years.

    Allrounder Carlos Brathwaite can provide both batting and bowling for the Tallawahs on the odd occasion, while Veerasammy Permaul can also do a job.

    Now, I wouldn’t venture to pick the Tallawahs line-up but they have last season’s leading runscorer for them, Glenn Phillips, who should partner Chadwick Walton. The two can be explosive and put any team on the back foot. In the middle order, there is exciting Pakistani batsman, Asif Ali, as well as the power of Rovman Powell and Andre Russell. On a given day, any of those names can hurt an opposition, but there is the question of consistency.

    That question has plagued the Tallawahs for years even though they have won the CPL twice.

    But on those two occasions, they had Chris Gayle and even though he may not have been the man to provide the finals-winning performances, he did come up with innings of real class that helped them in getting through the season.

    Last season the Tallawahs finished last and it is no surprise that Gayle had a poor run throughout.

    Without him, the Tallawahs seem less dangerous, but I am still rooting for them. They’re my team and seem more balanced than ever before, even without the mighty Chris.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.