Hundred price for Gayle was too high - Shane Warne

By October 21, 2019

T20 batting legend Chris Gayle might have priced himself out of the inaugural Hundred Draft held on Sunday.

The new professional 100-ball cricket tournament in England and Wales run by the ECB will commence in July 2020. The league will consist of eight city-based franchise teams, each of which will field both a men and women's team.

Gayle, who over the past decade has established himself as arguably the greatest T20 batsman in history with over 20 centuries to his credit, was surprisingly not selected by any of the franchises and now seems likely to miss the inaugural season.

He will only be able to get in if he is signed as an injury replacement.

Australian legend Shane Warne, who owns the London Spirit franchise, believes Gayle, who along with Sri Lanka’s Lasith Malinga, who both entered the draft at a base price of £125,000, might have priced themselves too high.

‘I think they priced themselves wrong. ‘If they’d gone in at £100,000 and not £125,000, I think they’d have been picked up,’ Warne said in an interview with The Metro.

The Southern Brave at £125,000 selected Andre Russell while the Oval Invincibles selected Sunil Narine, also for £125,000. The Invincibles also selected Fabian Allen for £50,000 while the Welsh Fire selected Ravi Rampaul for £75,000.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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