Proteas opener Markram to miss third India Test with self-inflicted wrist injury

By Sports Desk October 17, 2019

Aiden Markram will miss South Africa's third Test against India with a fractured wrist sustained when the opener "lashed out at a solid object".

The 25-year-old was dismissed for a pair in Pune as the Proteas crashed to an innings-and-137-run loss in the second Test last week.

India claimed an unassailable 2-0 lead in the best-of-three-match series and Markram will not be available for the dead rubber having suffered a fracture when he struck an object in frustration at his poor performance.

"It's sad to be going home on this note and I completely understand what I've done is wrong and take full accountability for it," Markram said.

"It's unacceptable in a Proteas environment and to let the team down is what hurts me the most. I've learned a lot from this and the other players I'm sure have learned from it as well.

"We understand in sport that emotions run high and sometimes the frustration gets the better of you as it did for me, but like I said, it's no excuse. I've taken full responsibility for it, I have apologised to the team and hopefully I can make it up to them and the people of South Africa soon."

Markram made a combined 46 in the two innings of the first Test, meaning he ends the series with an average of 11.

South Africa have not called up a replacement for the third Test, which begins on Saturday.

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