Ashes 2019: Six of the best debuts ahead of Archer's anticipated Lord's bow

By Sports Desk August 14, 2019

Jofra Archer is ready to come out all guns blazing on his expected England Test debut in the heat of an Ashes battle at Lord's.

Archer, who was presented with his Test cap while rain delayed the start of the second match against Australia, has made a dream start to his international career, playing a huge part in England's Cricket World Cup triumph on home soil.

The Barbados-born quick will also be under pressure to hit the ground running should he face Australia on his bow in the longest format in London after the tourists won the first match of the series at Edgbaston.

We take a look at six of the best performances by players making their Test debuts in the Ashes over the years.

 

BOB MASSIE, LORD'S 1972

Nerves were clearly not an issue for Australia new boy Massie when he stepped out onto the hallowed Lord's turf for his maiden appearance in the longest format 47 years ago.

The swing bowler recorded what were at that point the best match figures by a Test debutant after being handed the new ball, taking 16-137.

England's batsmen had no answer to his late swing, Massey taking a magnificent 8-84 in the first innings and 8-53 in the second to set up an eight-wicket victory, levelling the series at 1-1.

 

MARK WAUGH, ADELAIDE OVAL 1991

Australia great Waugh started his magnificent Test career in style with a majestic debut century.

The prolific right-hander struck 138, including 18 boundaries, in the first innings of a drawn second match of the series at Adelaide Oval in 1991.

Australia went on to win 3-0 and although Waugh played just one more match in that series, he struck a further 19 centuries and averaged 41.81 in a stellar Test career.

 

GRAHAM THORPE, TRENT BRIDGE 1993

Thorpe is another batsman who will have very fond memories of his maiden Test appearance, digging in for a gutsy unbeaten century at Trent Bridge.

The England left-hander showed great character and application to prevent Australia from wrapping up the series in the penultimate Test in Nottingham, batting for over five hours and facing 280 balls for his 114 not out.

Graham Gooch (120) and Nasser Hussain (47no) also frustrated the tourists, although Allan Border's side took the 1993 series 3-1 with a crushing victory at Lord's.

 

KEVIN PIETERSEN, LORD'S 2005

Pietersen showed he is the man for the big occasion in London 14 years ago, making half-centuries in both innings of the opening Test.

Although Australia won by 239 runs, maverick England stroke-maker Pietersen gave a taste of what was to come.

The innovative batsman made a huge impact in that classic series, which England won 2-1 - including a hugely important 158 in the second innings of the final Test under massive pressure to set up a draw.

 

JONATHAN TROTT, THE OVAL 2009

Trott was thrust into the battle of a decisive final Test at the Oval a decade ago and that proved to be a masterstroke of a selection.

Coming in at number five, the tenacious batsman made 41 in the first innings and 119 second time around after arriving at the crease with England 39-3 - having secured a first-innings lead of 172.

Trott, Andrew Strauss (75) and Graeme Swann (63) left Australia facing a huge run chase and they were bowled out for 348 to go down 2-1.

 

ASHTON AGAR, TRENT BRIDGE 2013

Agar was selected by Australia for his left-arm spin, but it was his batting that had England scratching their heads in Nottingham six years ago.

At the age of 19, Agar came out to bat at number 11 with the tourists reeling on 117-9 in reply to England's 215 all out.

Agar proceeded to make 98 - the highest Test score by a number 11 - in a final stand of 163 with the late Phillip Hughes (81no) and made Alastair Cook his maiden Test scalp, but England edged a dramatic 14-run victory.

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