Black Caps will use 2015 World Cup heartbreak as motivation - Taylor

By Sports Desk April 03, 2019

Ross Taylor is confident New Zealand can go all the way at the Cricket World Cup and put their 2015 heartbreak behind them.

The Black Caps won all of their eight matches on the way to the final four years ago, beating England, Australia and Sri Lanka in the group stages before knockout wins over West Indies and South Africa.

Australia denied them a clean sweep, though, as they produced a stunning bowling display to limit New Zealand to 183 – a total they eclipsed inside 34 overs.

New Zealand named their squad for the 2019 edition on Tuesday, with a host of names from four years ago still heavily involved.

One of those is Taylor, and he believes Gary Stead's squad are focused on going one better this time around.

"I think the last World Cup will play a big part in terms of experience and dealing with those big games," he told Cricket New Zealand.

"We were pipped at the last one but I think the players will use that as motivation.

"The players are just a lot more experienced, still a lot of those guys who played in that final are in the side and hopefully we can go one step further in the UK."

While this year's tournament will be Taylor's fourth, it will be Henry Nicholls' World Cup debut and he is relishing the opportunity having watched the heartbreak in 2015.

"It's awesome to be named for the World Cup, it's my first World Cup squad, it's pretty surreal," he said.

"What's ahead is a lot of hard work leading up to it, and obviously once we get there in England making sure we hit the ground running.

"We've played a lot of white-ball cricket in the last 12-18 months so we're coming in with a good diet of that."

Related items

  • Ambris called in as cover for Lewis, Dwayne Bravo, Pollard make reserves Ambris called in as cover for Lewis, Dwayne Bravo, Pollard make reserves

    The West Indies selectors have rewarded Sunil Ambris and John Campbell for the good work they did during the Walton Tri-Series in Ireland which concluded on Friday. 

  • 'Number 40 comes up a lot in the bible' - Sammy believes 40-year drought could be clue Windies about to lift World Cup 'Number 40 comes up a lot in the bible' - Sammy believes 40-year drought could be clue Windies about to lift World Cup

    Former Windies skipper Darren Sammy believes the regional team will be crowned ICC World Cup champions but has a particularly interesting reason for coming to that conclusion.

    The 12th edition of the tournament will mark 40 years since the West Indies won the tournament in 1979.  However, far from those days and despite a strong showing against the world number one-ranked team England recently, the Caribbean unit, who struggled to make the tournament in the first place, will not be most experts pick to win it all.

    Sammy, the former T20 World Cup champion believes different forces could be at play.  Despite the fact that team will be one of the lowest ranked heading into the tournament, Sammy believes the number 40 could hold a charm for the team, based on its religious and symbolic significance.

     The tournament will also be the last for the arguably the region’s biggest star, Chris Gayle, who is expected to retire following the tournament and the motivation could be high to give him a proper send off.

    “West Indies will win the World Cup. With Chris Gayle retiring, the ‘Universe Boss’ will want to leave with a bang. I just have a strong feeling. It’s been 40 years since we last won the World Cup. I’m a biblical man and the number 40 comes up a lot in the bible… I think it’s our time to rise up,” Sammy was quoted as saying by metro.co.uk.

  • Sarfraz: Pakistan must improve in the field Sarfraz: Pakistan must improve in the field

    Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed delivered mixed news on the injury front and acknowledged his side need to improve their fielding after they were beaten by three wickets at Trent Bridge to lose their ODI series against England.

    Having lost with respective totals of 361 and 358 at Southampton and Bristol respectively, Pakistan failed to defend a score of 340-7 on Friday, despite a significant wobble from their hosts in reply.

    Ben Stokes' unbeaten 71 proved crucial for England after Jason Roy, who was dropped twice, scored 114 amid some lacklustre work in the field.

    In the post-match presentation, Sarfraz lamented Pakistan's mistakes and provided updates on the fitness of Imam-ul-Haq and Mohammad Amir.

    "If we were fielding well and took catches, we had enough runs on the board," said the wicketkeeper-batsman.

    "We've been working very hard for the last one and a half years and it was very improved, but the way we've fielded here in three matches is not up to the mark. We have to improve."

    Imam was forced to retire hurt after being struck on the elbow by a delivery from Mark Wood, but the opener was cleared of a fracture following X-rays and returned late in Pakistan's innings.

    Paceman Amir, meanwhile, has yet to feature in the series due to illness and it is unclear when he will be able to return, with Pakistan's Cricket World Cup opener just a fortnight away.

    "Imam hopefully will be ok," said Sarfraz. "He's got a bruise on his elbow so hopefully he will come back, but I'm not sure about Amir."

    Roy revealed his impressive innings had come as something of a surprise after he spent the night in hospital with his daughter.

    He told the BBC's Test Match Special: "I'm not in the form of my life. It was not my most fluent of innings but it was an extremely special feeling to get over three figures. I didn't see it coming.

    "I had a bit of a rough morning so this one is a special one for me and my family.

    "It was my little one. We had to take her to hospital at 1:30 in the morning. I stayed there until 8:30 and came back for a couple of hours sleep and got to the ground just before the warm-up and cracked on. It was a very emotional hundred."

© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.