Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft have all been named in a 25-man group for the match between Australia and Australia A in Southampton.

Having been beaten by England in the Cricket World Cup semi-finals, Australia will now turn their attention to Test action, with the Ashes beginning on August 1.

The tourists will first face their 'A' team, and a squad for both sides to select from for a 12-v-12 four-day match has been confirmed.

Smith and Warner were both involved in the World Cup for the ODI side, but neither they nor Bancroft have featured for Australia's Test team since they were banned following the ball-tampering scandal last year.

Former skipper Smith and vice-captain Warner served year-long bans, while Bancroft, who has subsequently been playing county cricket with Durham, was suspended for nine months following the incident during Australia's tour of South Africa.

Marcus Stoinis and Glenn Maxwell are not included in this squad, but Alex Carey is involved and could get a first Test nod against England after an impressive World Cup.

Selector Trevor Hohns said of the group named for the warm-up match: "We have picked a group of players for a serious contest in Southampton which will assist us in finalising our squad for the Ashes series.

"Even though we know what the core of our Ashes squad will look like, the match in Southampton will be a final opportunity for some players to push their cases for inclusion in the touring party as there are still a small number of spots up for grabs.

"On that basis, we are expecting a full-on contest between players who will be hungry to succeed.
 
“In one way it is a shame that some players will have to miss out as every player in Southampton will have a strong case for inclusion in the Ashes squad.

"But the positive is that this group shows we now have a degree of depth, which stands us in good stead both now and in the middle term."

Jamaica Reggae Girlz patron Cedella Marley recently expressed strong disapproval of how the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) handles funding.

Brad Hogg believes Australia "need to find answers" after middle-order failures led to them bowing out of the Cricket World Cup.

Two-time World Cup winner Hogg is urging selectors to develop a long-term vision for the team, with a view to them being trophy contenders at the 2023 tournament in India.

And if long-standing members of the side such as David Warner, Steve Smith and Aaron Finch, all men in their thirties, are unlikely to be playing ODI cricket by that stage, Hogg has questioned whether they should hang around.

“What needs to change? Not much needs to change," Hogg told Omnisport.

"We just need to work out whether Warner and Smith, as well as Finch, are going to be around in four years’ time.

"Mitchell Starc – is his body going to hold up? We’ve got to make sure we get depth in our bowling department.

"But that middle order – we’ve got to find answers there. We’ve got to get a decent all-rounder, and we’ve got to have a number five that can handle the pressure."

Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis endured poor World Cup campaigns with the bat, neither making a half-century, and they were the glaring examples of middle-order underachievers.

"We can’t just rely on one batsman like [Alex] Carey to work through those tough situations at the end," Hogg said. "That’s probably the only holes I see that we need to fill."

Australia finished second in the group stage at the World Cup but an eight-wicket semi-final defeat at the hands of England was a painful way to wave trophy hopes goodbye.

Hogg, 48, was a limited-overs specialist, a tricky left-arm wrist spinner who would often add useful runs down the order.

He has noticed a pick-up in Australia's ODI performances, with series victories over India and Pakistan preceding their World Cup run.

They were thrashed 5-0 by England last summer, not long after the ball-tampering scandal that led to suspensions for Warner, Smith and Cameron Bancroft.

And Hogg feels Australia are now a far stronger unit.

He said the team appear "rejuvenated", adding: "You can turn things around in a couple of months. 

"Yes, we’ve had a tough time of it over the last couple of years but the attitude of this Australian team, I’ve been so impressed.

"They prepared well, they left no stone unturned, and where they were two months ago I wouldn't have given them a chance in this World Cup. These guys can hold their heads up high and Australians [can] be proud of these performances."

England star Jason Roy has been fined after reacting badly to his controversial dismissal in the Cricket World Cup semi-final win over Australia.

The opener's stunning knock was ended on 85 when he was given out caught behind despite replays showing he made no contact with a Pat Cummins delivery.

Roy initially refused to walk, but England had no reviews left so he had no choice but to leave the field.

He did so in evident disgust at umpire Kumar Dharmasena's decision, with his reaction constituting dissent and a breach of Article 2.8 of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel.

The 28-year-old, who admitted the offence and sanction, has been fined 30 per cent of his match fee and awarded two demerit points, but will be available for Sunday's final against New Zealand.

Eoin Morgan's side won by eight wickets at Edgbaston, having reduced Australia to 223 all out before completing their chase in 32.1 overs. 

Eoin Morgan lauded England's remarkable ODI revival after his side reached the Cricket World Cup final four years after a humiliating group-stage exit.

An eight-wicket thrashing of Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday underlined England's quality, which is a long way removed from the abysmal displays they produced at the 2015 tournament.

Back then they missed out on the knockout phase after losing to Bangladesh, marking a low point for English cricket in the one-day game.

But on Sunday they will contest a Lord's final with New Zealand, which Morgan could not have foreseen after their miserable outing in Australia and New Zealand last time out.

"If you told me after the last World Cup that we'd reach the final I wouldn't have believed you," the captain told the BBC's Test Match Special.

"It sums up how far we have come in the last four years. Everyone should take a huge amount of credit.

"Today was close to a perfect performance, right from the two bowlers up front. Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer bowled a hell of a spell.

"They put pressure on with early wickets and allowed us to stay on the front foot."

Speaking on the field, Morgan also praised the fans who roared England on to victory, marking their third triumph in a row after consecutive wins over India and the Black Caps pulled the hosts back from the brink of another early exit.

"I would like to thank the fans – we've had unbelievable support and Edgbaston has always been very kind to us," he said.

"Having beaten India in the group stages here we would've come here with similar confidence. The way we have taken momentum from the last two group games into the semi-finals is very important.

"We set the tone early and when we got on top we made Australia pay."

Aaron Finch conceded Australia had been "totally outplayed" by England as the hosts stormed into the Cricket World Cup final on Thursday.

England secured an eight-wicket win at Edgbaston after bowling Australia out for 223, with Jason Roy's explosive 85 doing much of the damage in a chase that was completed in 32.1 overs.

Australia, who won what was considered a potentially pivotal toss, were on the back foot almost immediately and Finch was among the early wickets to fall after failing to score.

"We were totally outplayed," said the captain after Australia's first World Cup semi-final loss. "The way they set the tone with the ball in those first 10 overs was a huge part in the game.

"You expect the new ball to seam a bit on any surface but they bowled a great length, hitting the stumps a lot.

"There are still a lot of positives to take out of the campaign and from the last few months – we've come a long way from where we were last year in ODI cricket in this country.

"You always want to win the trophy but there have been a lot of positives. A lot of hard work has gone in from a lot of people. I'm proud of how the group has progressed but this still hurts.

"We tried to change it up as much as we could but Roy and [Jonny] Bairstow are so dynamic when they are on top. We didn't execute as well as we could and got hurt by a very good England team."

It is the first time Australia have lost to England at a 50-over World Cup since 1992, which is also the last time the latter reached the final. 

Much of the talk around England and Australia's Cricket World Cup semi-final focused on one word – pressure.

And, with serial World Cup winners and reigning champions Australia perhaps more intent on Ashes glory later on this tour, the majority of those discussions centred on England.

Would they wilt at the semi-final stage? Could they chase down a total? Would the expectancy of the Edgbaston faithful weigh heavy on their shoulders?

The answer to all those questions was a resounding 'no', as Eoin Morgan's men stormed into a Lord's final against New Zealand with an eight-wicket thrashing on Thursday in front of an increasingly raucous crowd that belted out 'Sweet Caroline' with intensifying vigour as the end drew near.

A developing trend at these finals has seen sides win the toss, opt to bat, post a score and subsequently squeeze the opposition on deteriorating pitches.

Coming into this encounter, 17 of the previous 21 matches had been won by the side batting first – a sequence that included England's victories over India and New Zealand to secure their place in the last four.

On both occasions, the hosts went big and comfortably defended their totals, but the two prior outings had seen altogether different outcomes.

England failed to chase 233 against Sri Lanka at Headingley and were well short as Australia cruised to a 64-run win at Lord's.

Before the tournament, Morgan's men were seen as the team that could overhaul any score, thumping Pakistan 4-0 in an ODI series that featured two successful chases in excess of 340.

Those losses to Sri Lanka and Australia changed that perception, at least among pundits and the public, and another P-word – pressure – became a significant factor in the equation.

But that was nowhere to be seen at Edgbaston on Thursday, as Australia were rolled out for 223 before a below-par target was overhauled with 107 balls remaining.

Once again, England owed much to Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow, who added 124 for the opening stand inside 18 overs – their fourth successive century partnership.

In Wednesday's media conference, Aaron Finch talked up the importance of the first 10 overs. Whoever started the better would likely go on and win, was the suggestion.

The Australia captain got his first wish in winning the toss and opting to bat, only to fall to Jofra Archer for a golden duck and then watch as David Warner and Peter Handscomb swiftly joined him back in the dressing room. After 10 overs, Australia were 27-3 and had struck only three fours.

England, by contrast, had surpassed that tally inside six overs and had even added a Roy maximum for good measure en route to being 50-0 at the end of the first powerplay.

The chat in the media box during the innings break was that 224 could prove a challenging target – after all, England had failed in similar circumstances against Sri Lanka while there were lessons to be learned from New Zealand's semi-final win over India 24 hours previously, when the Black Caps successfully defended 239.

But Roy and Bairstow strode out as if this was a bilateral series bash-fest, an approach underlined by the former launching Nathan Lyon's first ball for six and reverse sweeping for four later in the same over.

Struggling to stem the flow, Finch turned to the occasional leg-spin of Steve Smith. Roy responded by hammering three straight sixes, the third an absolute monster into the top tier.

The early swing Chris Woakes and Archer had enjoyed was not evident for Mitchell Starc and Jason Behrendorff, while England's openers took full advantage as Roy produced another performance that will only intensify calls for him to be included in the Ashes squad.

Ahead of a World Cup final, that is a discussion for another day, but this display should at least put to bed all the prior talk of pressure and whether it would overwhelm this England team.

Exactly a year on from the men's football team's semi-final heartache, the Edgbaston crowd sang 'Cricket's coming home'. That is yet to be decided but, on this evidence, if England are found wanting at Lord's, it is unlikely to be due to the gravity of the occasion.

Chris Woakes was delighted as England demonstrated their class in an eight-wicket demolition of Australia to reach the Cricket World Cup final.

With figures of 3-20, Woakes' man-of-the-match display epitomised England's dominance of Thursday's clash at Edgbaston, where Australia were bowled out for 223.

Jason Roy (85) starred with the bat as the tournament hosts chased down the target in 32.1 overs, setting up a Lord's showdown with New Zealand on Sunday.

"I'm pretty speechless," said Woakes after England reached the final for the first time since 1992. "It was an incredible performance from the whole team.

"It started with the bowling performance and then the way they [the batsmen] knocked that off was outstanding.

"There were some nerves around this morning but that's natural going into a semi-final. The way we produced the goods just showed how good we are and where we are at as a team.

"It hasn't sunk in that we're in a World Cup final and hopefully we can go all the way.

"We were tipped as favourties so it was important to get to the semi-final in the first place, and then to win this in this fashion against this Australia side on the best ground in the world is amazing."

Jason Roy spearheaded a superb all-round England display in a crushing eight-wicket victory over bitter rivals Australia to set up a Cricket World Cup final with New Zealand. 

Mitchell Starc set a new record for wickets taken at a single Cricket World Cup when he dismissed England's Jonny Bairstow at Edgbaston on Thursday.

The Australia left-arm quick came into the semi-final having claimed 26 victims in his prior nine matches at the tournament, the same number as compatriot Glenn McGrath picked up at the 2007 edition.

Starc's haul included the 4-43 he took in the group-stage defeat of England at Lord's and he set the new benchmark by trapping Bairstow lbw for 34.

There was little cause for celebration for Starc, though, as that left England 124-1 in the 18th over after bowling Australia out for just 223.

Joe Root sent three of Starc's next four deliveries to the boundary, leaving the paceman with figures of 1-50 after five overs and England seemingly on course to set up a final showdown with New Zealand at Lord's.

Steve Smith's 85 was the saving grace for Australia as England restricted their opponents to 223 all out in the second Cricket World Cup semi-final.

Having won the toss at Edgbaston on Thursday, Australia slipped to 14-3 as Aaron Finch, David Warner and Peter Handscomb all fell cheaply to Jofra Archer (2-32) and Chris Woakes (3-20).

Smith mounted a recovery alongside Alex Carey (46), the pair adding 103 for the fourth wicket before the wicketkeeper took an unnecessary risk against Adil Rashid and holed out to deep midwicket.

Rashid (3-54) picked up Marcus Stoinis for a duck in the same over and also removed Pat Cummins after Glenn Maxwell had popped Archer to cover.

Smith received further support in the shape of Mitchell Starc (29) and it took a fine run out from Jos Buttler to end the former captain's innings, which lasted 119 balls and contained six fours.

It was a potentially crucial one for Australia, who have advanced from all seven of their previous World Cup semi-finals as New Zealand await the victors at Lord's on Sunday.

England made a sensational start to the Cricket World Cup semi-final against Australia by removing Aaron Finch, David Warner and Peter Handscomb inside seven overs.

Finch and Warner had combined for more than 1,100 runs at this tournament but made just nine between them as Jofra Archer and Chris Woakes each picked up a huge early scalp, before the latter also removed Handscomb to leave Australia reeling at 14-3.

Captain Finch won the toss and opted to bat at Edgbaston on Thursday but may have been ruing that decision when he was trapped in front by Archer from the first ball he faced.

To make matters worse, Finch opted to use the DRS and three reds on the ball-tracker meant his side lost their review after just seven deliveries.

Warner crunched two fours off Woakes but he perished for nine in the next over, edging to Jonny Bairstow at slip.

Handscomb, selected due to Usman Khawaja's hamstring injury, survived a review on umpire's call first ball but was soon cleaned up by Woakes as England tore into the top order.

Australia won the toss and chose to bat first against England in Thursday's Cricket World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston.

The tournament hosts struggled badly when chasing against Aaron Finch's men during the group-stage defeat at Lord's, while they also showed frailties in failing to overhaul a moderate score in a shock loss to Sri Lanka at Headingley.

England captain Eoin Morgan confirmed his side was unchanged from the one that hammered New Zealand to seal a place in the semis, while Australia's sole alteration sees Peter Handscomb come in for the injured Usman Khawaja, as had been announced by head coach Justin Langer prior to the game.

There had been talk that Matthew Wade - called into the squad as Khawaja's replacement - may be selected ahead of Glenn Maxwell, but the all-rounder retained his place in the XI.

Not since 1992 have England gone this deep at the World Cup, while Australia are aiming to continue their perfect record in semi-finals, having progressed from all seven of their previous matches at this stage of the competition.

The victors will go through to Sunday's final at Lord's to face New Zealand, who sensationally defeated India at Old Trafford on Wednesday.

Football Federation Australia (FFA) chief executive David Gallop will step down from the position at the end of the year.

FFA chairman Chris Nikou announced on Thursday that Gallop would leave the organisation on December 31.

The former NRL CEO has been criticised often since being appointed by FFA in 2012, but Nikou paid tribute to Gallop in a statement.

"David has provided strong and distinguished leadership over a long period and particularly through a difficult last few years for FFA as we have managed the governance and structural changes around the game," he said.

"Working together for the next six months, we will continue to reposition FFA for ongoing success. While he will be with us for some time yet, David will leave us with our respect and sincerest best wishes for continued success in the next stage of his career."

It was announced on July 1 that an in-principle agreement had been reached to establish independence for the A-League, W-League and Y-League.

Gallop said that would lead to changes for the FFA CEO, but he was pleased with some of his achievements.

"It has been an honour to lead FFA for the last seven years. Football is the true world game and many Australians from all backgrounds want to see it grow bigger and stronger in the decades to come. From the Caltex Socceroos and the Westfield Matildas to the vast participation base of men, women, boys and girls who love to kick a football there are so many wonderful ways to enjoy the sport," he said.

"With the NLWG [New Leagues Working Group] recommendations to bring about fundamental changes to Australia's professional competitions – the Hyundai A-League, Westfield W-League and Foxtel Y-League [the Leagues] and FFA, the chief executive's role as it currently exists will be a very different, narrower role. It makes sense for everyone to have time to openly determine what that new role and new leadership looks like.

"It has been very satisfying to be part of so many important moments including the introduction of the FFA Cup, winning the AFC Asian Cup, participating in the FIFA Women's World Cup & FIFA World Cups, securing a record six-year media rights deal with Fox Sports, strengthening the financial aspects of women's football, adding expansion teams to the Hyundai A-League and growing the huge participation base of the game.

"There are challenges given the expectations that are created by the global mirror that is held up to the game in this country's competitive sporting landscape, but enormous growth opportunities are available if the stakeholders are united."

Tournament hosts England face off against Ashes rivals Australia in a blockbuster Cricket World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston on Thursday.

Damaging losses to Sri Lanka and Australia left England fearing the worst for their last-four hopes, but an impressive response with wins over India and New Zealand booked their ticket to the knockout stages.

Australia's passage was far more serene, apart from a loss to India and an unexpected defeat to South Africa in their final group game, as the defending champions chase a sixth World Cup title.

Just over two weeks ago, it was Australia celebrating at Lord's as Jason Behrendorff and Mitchell Starc tore through England's batting order to seal victory despite Ben Stokes' valiant 89.

But Edgbaston has not been a happy hunting ground for Australia, with their last win at the venue in any format coming in a 2001 Test match. England have won three straight ODIs against their opponents in Birmingham, too.

History is not exactly on England's side, though, with their last Cricket World Cup win against Australia coming back in 1992 when Ian Botham stole the show, taking 4-31 with the ball and contributing 53 with the bat.

New Zealand, who defeated India in a rain-delayed semi-final at Old Trafford that spanned across two days, await in the final.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

A shock loss to Sri Lanka preceded England again falling short against Australia but the triumphs over India and New Zealand showed their mettle as they lived up to their billing as pre-tournament favourites. Australia missed out on top spot after losing to South Africa in their final group game but largely impressed during the group stages, Starc leading the wicket-taking list with 26.

WHAT THEY SAID

England captain Eoin Morgan on the team's return to form: "I think we're probably more confident than we were three games ago. I think we are probably a different team that played four games ago and three games ago. I think the loss against Sri Lanka hurt us. It was an overhang into the Lord's game and then when we came here we managed to produce something similar to the cricket we have been playing over the last four years and that was really encouraging."

Australia skipper Aaron Finch on his country's World Cup record: "I think World Cups are very special, they bring out the best in the best players, so I think that's why Australia have had a very rich history in World Cups. I mean, winning four of the last five, it's been a great achievement."

OPTA FACTS

- England have won 10 of the last 12 ODIs between the countries, though one of their two defeats in that run came at Lord's earlier in this tournament.
- Starc needs one more wicket to set a record for the most taken at a single World Cup - he sits level with Glenn McGrath's tally of 26 from 2007.
- Steve Smith has only managed to record one half-century in his last 10 ODI innings against England, though that solitary 50 did come at Edgbaston (2017). He has been dismissed five times by Adil Rashid in the 50-over format.
- Australia have been involved in seven previous World Cup semi-finals and have progressed to the final every time. 

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