Sri Lanka assistant coach Rumesh Ratnayake was "gutted" after another poor batting performance proved costly against Australia in a Twenty20 international.

Chasing 234 to win the series opener in Adelaide, Sri Lanka were restricted to 99-9 last Sunday.

And another one-sided contest played out in Brisbane on Wednesday, as the tourists were bowled out for 117 with one over to spare.

Just two Sri Lanka batsmen passed 20 as quicks Billy Stanlake and Pat Cummins and spinners Ashton Agar and Adam Zampa took two wickets each.

Australia then chased down a victory target of 118 in 13 overs, with David Warner (60 not out) and Steve Smith (53 not out) guiding their side to a convincing nine-wicket win.

"Disappointed is ... I think it's too nice a word," Ratnayake told reporters, with Australia now holding an unbeatable 2-0 series lead with one to play.

"I'm gutted, really. The boys are gutted. But [it is] unacceptable because the way we batted ... [it was] as if we, at times, we thought we were going to be all out in the 12th over or so.

"We are going to rectify it. We are going to sort of revisit [it] in our meetings and see what went wrong. It is intent which I feel was not there."

Sri Lanka entered the three-match series in Australia fresh off a 3-0 whitewash of world number one side Pakistan.

Making that triumph even better was the fact it came in Pakistan, but Sri Lanka have struggled on the fast, bouncy Australian pitches.

Ratnayake said it was a priority to correct that ahead of next year's T20 World Cup, to be played in Australia from October to November.

"Our preparation needs to be much more ... it needs to have at least a period of six weeks," he said.

"We came directly - virtually directly from Pakistan. The sub-continent wickets are different from these ... no excuses though.

"Adaptation was the thing which we did not do in the past two matches."

Australia paceman Stanlake was pleased with his night's work but preferred to talk up former Test captain Smith, who caught the eye with a terrific half-century.

"It's exciting for us. I think it's exciting for the public as well, just to watch him play T20 cricket," Stanlake said.

"Obviously, they don't get to see him do that too much.

"But yeah, he is an absolute class player, you saw how he good was tonight, again. He does it in all formats and hopefully we can see him doing it often."

The three-match Twenty20 international series concludes in Melbourne on Friday.

David Warner and Steve Smith each produced unbeaten half-centuries as Australia breezed to a nine-wicket victory over Sri Lanka and secured a Twenty20 series win.

Australia enjoyed a record margin of victory in the opening contest of the three-match series, triumphing by 134 runs, and it quickly became apparent matters would be similarly straightforward at the Gabba.

Sri Lanka batted first and could not see out the 20 overs as they were all out for 117 with Kusal Perera top-scoring on a measly 27.

Captain Aaron Finch's first-ball dismissal for the hosts was then as good as it got for Sri Lanka with the ball, as Smith joined Warner for a straightforward chase, which was completed with seven overs still remaining.

The opener made 60 and Smith added 53 as Australia (118-1) clinched the series with a match to spare, ahead of surely more taxing T20 and Test outings against Pakistan next month.

Sri Lanka did not help themselves after winning the toss and electing to bat, with a terrible mix-up seeing Kusal Mendis run out in just the second over.

Australia never ceded control and shared the wickets around as Ashton Agar (2-27) accounted for the potentially dangerous duo of Avishka Fernando (17) and Perera.

Alex Carey was busy behind the wicket, stumping both Wanindu Hasaranga and Lasith Malinga off the bowling of Adam Zampa (2-20).

Billy Stanlake took 2-23 and Pat Cummins 2-29, before the latter ran out Lakshan Sandakan to bring another dismal Sri Lanka innings to a close.

Opening bowler Malinga then gave the tourists brief hope as Finch was caught down the leg side by Perera, though that wicket merely brought Smith to the crease.

An unbroken partnership of 117 was speedy enough without being truly explosive, with 15 fours - four of them in the fifth over alone - but no maximums between Warner and Smith.

Sandakan made a mess of a late attempted run-out of Smith, and Australia had seven overs to spare when Hasaranga bowled a wide past Warner to complete a simple chase.

David Warner said the support he received from Australia fans was music to his ears as he marked his birthday by scoring a maiden Twenty20 International century in a hammering of Sri Lanka.

Warner must have had jeers ringing in his ears when he returned home after spectators in England let him know what they thought about his part in the Newlands ball-tampering scandal.

The opening batsman was subjected to boos and verbals from crowds during the Cricket World Cup and a drawn Ashes series after making his comeback from a one-year suspension.

Warner endured a miserable Ashes series with the bat but scored a hundred in New South Wales' Sheffield Shied opener this month and plundered 100 not out in the first match of the T20 series against Sri Lanka on Sunday.

The left-hander expressed his gratitude to the Adelaide Oval crowd after he smashed the Sri Lanka attack to all parts in a 134-run drubbing - Australia's biggest by runs in a T20 - on his 33rd birthday.

"It's always fantastic to get that [support]. You sort of sit back and watch highlights of other people's packages and stuff, you forget how much it actually drives you when you're out there," said the former Australia vice-captain.

"We love the people's support and we love the Australian crowds coming out and supporting us and we always try and put on a show for them.

"But I don't think they actually realise how much impact it has on us players while we are out there. I remember when I was supporting the [Sydney] Roosters in the [NRL] Grand Final this year.

"When you've got that support behind the team or when you're supporting someone else, it's a massive boost, the confidence for us and for the other people out there playing."

Warner said there was no other ground he would rather have been playing at in his first home international since returning from his ban.

"Emotions were great. Another year older. Another game for Australia and coming out here in front of an Adelaide crowd," he added.

"There's no better place to play, you know. You've always got a fantastic wicket; the curators are absolutely fantastic here. It's a batting paradise. I absolutely love it out here."

The tourists could only make 99-9 in reply to Australia's imposing 233-2, Adam Zampa taking 3-14.

David Warner marked his return to the international Twenty20 arena with a stunning maiden century as Australia eased past Sri Lanka by 134 runs in their opening game.

Warner was back in the T20 fold for the first time since the infamous ball-tampering saga, in which the star Australia batsman served a year-long suspension.

Having already made his Test and ODI comeback, birthday boy Warner capped his T20 return with an unbeaten hundred in his 71st appearance against touring Sri Lanka in Adelaide on Sunday.

Warner led Australia to a record-breaking victory, surpassing last year's 100-run win over Zimbabwe, and their highest T20 total on home soil – 233-2 – before hapless Sri Lanka only managed 99-9 in response at Adelaide Oval.

After a forgettable Ashes series in England which only yielded 95 runs across five matches, Warner was desperate to return to form as the Australian summer got underway.

Warner was back to his brilliant best on his 33rd birthday as the big-hitting star scored 100 runs from just 56 balls in game one of the three-match series against Sri Lanka – bringing up his ton from the last delivery of the innings.

The tone was set by Warner and captain Aaron Finch (64) after Sri Lanka opted to bowl first, with the opening pair combining for 122 runs from just 10.5 overs and reaching their half-centuries in the same over.

Finch and Warner smacked consecutive sixes from Kasun Rajitha – who finished with figures of 0-75 from four overs for the most expensive spell in T20 history – before the former was caught at deep midwicket off the bowling of Lakshan Sandakan (1-41).

Glenn Maxwell (62) then joined Warner at the crease as the duo put on 107 runs from just 52 balls, though Maxwell was dismissed by Dasun Shanaka (1-10) in the last over.

Sri Lanka made a nightmare start to their run chase after Kusal Mendis fell victim to Mitchell Starc (2-18) for a duck in the first over, before the visitors were left reeling at 13-3 in the four over as Pat Cummins (2-27) wreaked havoc.

Shanaka was Sri Lanka's highest score with 17 on putrid day for Sri Lanka, with spinner Adam Zampa (3-14) cleaning up the final three wickets, while Maxwell produced a stunning piece of fielding to run out Wanindu Hasaranga (5).

Cricket West Indies (CWI) today announced a brand new three-year home fixtures cycle, featuring the West Indies teams in all formats with matches in all the main venues across the Caribbean.

Michael Cheika believes his successor as Wallabies head coach should "definitely" be Australian.

Australia were dumped out of the Rugby World Cup in a 40-16 quarter-final defeat to England on Saturday.

Cheika brought his five-year stint in charge, which included a run to the World Cup final in 2015, to an end after the defeat.

New Zealand coaches Jamie Joseph and Dave Rennie have been linked with the post but, when touching down after flying back from Japan, Cheika told reporters Rugby Australia should look at home for their next appointment.

"I think definitely we should be pushing for an Australian coach," he said. 

"It's not up to me but I think we should be backing and supporting Australian coaches wherever possible."

Cheika had said before the tournament that he would step down if Australia failed to lift the trophy and he insists there was never a chance he would change his decision.

"We came second last time and I figure [after] four years you've got to come first next time," he added. 

"You can't call it and then change your mind afterwards because that's genuinely what we wanted to do - go there and win."

Skipper Michael Hooper paid tribute to Cheika's contribution on and off the training field.

"Cheik's been amazing, me personally I owe that man a lot," he said. "The passion that he represented us or stood up for us all the time and just generally wanted the best for Australian rugby. 

"Not just for the team, not just for him selfishly being the coach of the team but wanting the best for Australian rugby. 

"After he's long gone, to leave something that's positive, he's always believed in that and I think he will. 

"He's made me a better person, not just a rugby player. So, I've got a lot to thank him for that."

Eddie Jones claimed an England training session was spied on ahead of their blockbuster Rugby World Cup semi-final with New Zealand.

The head coach said the team were aware of someone filming from an apartment close to their Chiba training base, though he did not directly accuse the All Blacks of any underhand tactics.

Jones stated such methods were commonplace in the past but are now redundant such is the information readily available.

"There was definitely someone in the apartment block filming, but it might have been a Japanese fan," he told a media conference.

"We don't care, mate. We knew it from the start, but it doesn't change anything. We love it. It's part of the fun of the World Cup. We have got someone there [at New Zealand's training] now mate!

"I haven't done it since 2001. I used to do it. You just don't need to do it anymore. You can see everything. You can watch everyone's training on YouTube. 

"There's no value in doing that sort of thing – absolutely zero. Everyone knows what everyone does – there are no surprises in world rugby anymore. You just have to be good enough on the day."

England face a daunting task in Yokohama on Saturday against a New Zealand side chasing a third straight World Cup triumph.

Jones, though, believes his side can play without fear against the All Blacks, of who he says "the pressure will be chasing them down the street".

"We get to play one of the greatest teams ever that are shooting for a 'three-peat', which has never been done, so that brings an element of pressure," he added. 

"We don't have any pressure. No one thinks we can win. There are 120 million Japanese people out there whose second team are the All Blacks. 

"So, there's no pressure on us, we've just got to have a great week, enjoy it, relax. Train hard and enjoy this great opportunity we've got, whereas they've got to be thinking about how they're looking for their third World Cup and so that brings some pressure.

"It's our job to take the time and space away so that we put them under pressure. New Zealand talk about walking towards pressure, well this week the pressure is going to be chasing them down the street. That's the reality of it, that's how we're approaching it.

"Pressure is a real thing. The busiest bloke in Tokyo this week will be Gilbert Enoka – the [New Zealand] mental skills coach. 

"They have to deal with all this pressure of winning the World Cup three times and it is potentially the last game for their greatest coach and their greatest captain, and they will be thinking about those things. 

"Those thoughts go through your head. It is always harder to defend a World Cup and they will be thinking about that, therefore there is pressure."

Pakistan's squad has had a major shake-up for the upcoming tour of Australia, with five uncapped players named across the Test and Twenty20 parties.

Sarfraz Ahmed was sacked as Pakistan's captain on Friday, with the wicket-keeper batsman also dropped from the squad following a dismal 3-0 T20 series defeat to Sri Lanka.

Azhar Ali has taken over as the Test captain and will have teenage seamer Muhammad Musa Khan, who has been included in both touring selections, at his disposal.

Experienced spinner Kashif Bhatti will also be available for Azhar, as will youngster Nasim Shah.

Khushdil Shah and leg-spinner Usman Qadir, meanwhile, have been included in the T20 squad, which will be led by Babar Azam.

Faheem Ashraf, Fakhar Zaman, the injured Hasan Ali, Shadab Khan and Mohammad Amir, who announced his retirement from Test cricket earlier in 2019, have all dropped out of the five-day squad, while Ahmed Shehzad and Umar Akmal miss out on the T20 group.

Pakistan will play three T20Is and two Tests in Australia, with the tour beginning on November 3.

 

Pakistan T20 squad in full: Babar Azam (captain), Asif Ali, Fakhar Zaman, Haris Sohail, Iftikhar Ahmed, Imad Wasim, Imam-ul-Haq, Khushdil Shah, Mohammad Amir, Mohammad Hasnain, Mohammad Irfan, Mohammad Rizwan (wicketkeeper), Musa Khan, Shadab Khan, Usman Qadir, Wahab Riaz.

Pakistan Test squad in full: Azhar Ali (captain), Abid Ali, Asad Shafiq, Babar Azam, Haris Sohail, Imam-ul-Haq, Imran Khan, Iftikhar Ahmed, Kashif Bhatti, Mohammad Abbas, Mohammad Rizwan (wicketkeeper), Musa Khan, Nasim Shah, Shaheen Shah Afridi, Shan Masood, Yasir Shah.

Australia head coach Michael Cheika has stepped down following the Wallabies' Rugby World Cup exit in Japan.

Cheika confirmed he will not seek re-appointment after Australia were routed 40-16 by England in the World Cup quarter-finals on Saturday.

The 52-year-old, who guided the Wallabies to the 2015 World Cup final as he was named World Rugby Coach of the Year, bristled at questions over his future in the immediate aftermath of Australia's elimination.

However, former Waratahs boss Cheika quit on Sunday – ending his five-year stint in charge of Australia.

"It is no secret I have no relationship with the CEO [Raelene Castle] and not much with the chairman [Cameron Clyne]," Cheika was quoted as saying by the Sydney Morning Herald.

Cheika replaced Ewen McKenzie in 2014 and he made an immediate impact as the Wallabies reached the 2015 World Cup final – beaten by New Zealand.

That run to the decider saw Cheika become the first Australia coach to claim World Rugby's top coaching award since Rod Macqueen in 2001.

But the Wallabies' performances slowly regressed and pressure mounted on heading into this year's World Cup.

In a statement released by Rugby Australia, Cheika said: "I got asked the question in the press conference about what's going to happen going forward and at the time I wasn't keen to answer, but I always knew the answer in my head.

"I just wanted to speak to my wife and tell a few people up there [on the Rugby Australia board] about it.

"I put my chips in earlier in the year - I told people no win, no play.

"So, I'm the type of man who always goes to back what he says and I knew from the final whistle, but I just wanted to give it that little bit time to cool down, talk to my people and then make it clear."

New Zealander Dave Rennie – who is in charge of Glasgow Warriors having previously led the Chiefs to two Super Rugby titles – is the favourite to replace Cheika.

Wallabies head coach Michael Cheika insisted he would rather win playing the Australia way or no way after the country's Rugby World Cup elimination.

Australia crashed out of the World Cup quarter-finals following a 40-16 drubbing at the hands of rivals England in Oita on Saturday.

Despite a bright start, the Wallabies were no match for Eddie Jones' England as Cheika's tactics were brought into question in the aftermath.

Australia adopted a ball-in-hand approach during the tournament in Japan and Cheika was in a defiant mood amid doubts over his future.

"Listen, that's the way we play footy, I'm not going to go to a kick-and-defend game. Call me naive but that's not what I'm going to do," Cheika said.

"I'd rather win it our way or no way. That's the way Aussies want us to play."

Cheika, who led Australia to the 2015 World Cup final, added: "We scored some good tries, we were fit and as tends to happen to us sometimes, over the last few years and sometimes we encounter intercepts.

"Dropped ball, if I look back [at] the Fiji game, dropped ball … length of the field. The Wales game, intercepts. Intercepts again [here]. 

"That's definitely an issue we have to work on, how to close that part of the game down. Because if you put all those intercepts together and it went close to costing us one game, if not two. 

"I am really happy with the way the team played. Obviously we could have played better, no doubt. But just mastering those types of moments is the next step for the team, going forward for the next few years."

England boss Eddie Jones offered no sympathy to Australia after his team swamped the Wallabies at the Rugby World Cup.

A thumping 40-16 victory in Oita carried England through to the semi-finals, with Australian Jones the unabashed architect.

As his counterpart Michael Cheika just about held back tears, telling one journalist to show some "compassion" when raising the question of his future, Jones was jubilant after his own team's performance.

But when it came to sympathising with his former Randwick team-mate, there was nothing going.

"Look, it's tough when you lose a game, particularly at this level of a World Cup," Jones said in a post-match news conference.

"At this moment, not a lot of sympathy, no, because I'm enjoying the win and I think I'm allowed to enjoy the win.

"Maybe later in the week I might, so ask me that later in the week."

England will be deep in preparation for their semi-final task by then, and the impressive performance in their first match of the knock-out stage will count for very little.

They must not merely reprise the display that ripped Cheika's side apart but take it to the next level, Jones said.

"We just want to keep challenging ourselves. We haven't played at our best yet," Jones said.

"The challenge is: how do we get better next week?"

He said England would expect "probably the toughest game of the tournament" next and predicted a "twinge" that led two-try Jonny May to come off late in the Australia game will not keep him sidelined.

Jones described Kyle Sinckler as "like a runaway rhino" after his charge to the line for England's third try, and said George Ford was "absolutely spectacular" after coming off the bench in the second half, having been surprisingly left out of the starting line-up.

England's coach was wary, though, of placing the team on too high a pedestal, even when touching on a favourite pet topic of samurai warriors.

"It's a do-or-die game today. Everyone understands that, and the best samurais were always guys who had a plan but could adapt, who had a calm head, but they were full of aggression," Jones said.

"I thought we were pretty much like that today.

"The challenge is always how we get better, because there's always a better samurai around the corner, so we have to get better."

Michael Cheika urged a reporter to show "compassion" as he objected to being asked whether he intends to step down as Australia's head coach following their Rugby World Cup exit.

Cheika's contract is set to expire and he is widely expected to leave his position, having previously said he would not seek reappointment if the Wallabies did not win the tournament.

However, in a tense news conference after a 40-16 quarter-final loss to England in Oita, the 52-year-old took exception to being asked if he was considering his role.

"It's a cruel, cruel world nowadays when you're asking those questions two minutes after we've been knocked out of the World Cup," said a dejected Cheika.

"If you'd find it inside you to find a little bit of compassion for people who are hurting and just ask a more relevant question [that would be appreciated], because I came here with only one thought in my mind, about winning here. That thought has just disappeared now, not 15-20 minutes ago.

"I know that's what the papers demand, but perhaps, whatever your news outlet is, you should think about people's feelings."

Cheika's future was not raised again until the final question of the news conference. A journalist, who began his enquiry by saying he "appreciated the timeframe", reminded Cheika of his pre-tournament comments about standing aside if Australia did not triumph, asking if that was still his intention.

That query was also rebuffed by Cheika, who swiftly responded: "If you appreciate the timeframe, why ask the question?

He added: "When the time comes, I'll tell 'em [Rugby Australia].

"They don't need to know today - it's not going to kill 'em."

Eddie Jones insists England are still capable of improvement despite earning an impressive 40-16 win over Australia in the Rugby World Cup quarter-finals.

England will face New Zealand or Ireland in the last four next weekend after they scored four tries to the Wallabies' one in Oita on Saturday.

Head coach Jones recognised Australia had made the stronger start to the encounter but was impressed with how his players came through.

"The good news for us is we can still improve," he said after the match. "We weren't absolutely at our best. Australia started the game fast, played superbly for the first 20 and we had to hang in there.

"We hung in there, got a bit of momentum back and got the points when we needed. I'm so pleased for the players, they have worked hard to get this result. What a great crowd, fantastic.

"We are happy to play anyone now but obviously I've got a soft spot for New Zealand. I'd love to play New Zealand in the semi-final, it would be a great challenge for us, we'd be looking forward to it."

Jonny May scored two tries in the space of four first-half minutes, while Kyle Sinckler and Anthony Watson dotted down after England went into the interval with a 17-9 lead.

"Scott Wisemantel has done a great job with getting more options in our attack," added Jones.

"Maybe at the start of the four years here we were a little bit too one dimensional but now we have more options, he's done a great job in that area."

Captain Owen Farrell, who contributed 20 points off the tee, also praised Australia for the way they approached the game.

He said: "I thought Australia made that a brilliant game. They attacked throughout, from minute one to 80.

"Our boys did well in defence and then managed to get some field position off the back of it. We know that when we get some field position we can be pretty dangerous.

"My kicking was a lot better than last time!"

On England's second-half approach, as the forwards and kicking game played more of a role to tighten the match up, Farrell added: "We did what was needed.

"We had the lead and obviously Australia were throwing everything at us again. We wanted to play the game at our pace, not theirs, and thankfully we did that in the second half.

"The support has been brilliant. It's a massive privilege to play for England and hopefully you see that when we play. It's brilliant to have them behind us."

Thank goodness that's over, and Michael Cheika can get back to just being a "good old mate" of Eddie Jones again.

How it must have pained the old scrum colleagues from their Randwick days to be jostling against each other at a Rugby World Cup.

From being on the same side, dressing-room besties in the 1980s, to being sworn enemies at least for a week. It can't be good for anybody's health.

It sure as hell looked like being a grim state of affairs for Cheika, who whenever the television cameras honed in on him in the stands at Oita Stadium, looked to be living out a personal nightmare.

A thump of the desk here, a look of desperation there. Surely he'll be on his way to pastures new once the dust settles on this thumping 40-16 England victory over Australia.

He dramatically called for "compassion" from a journalist after the match, when asked if he would be moving on.

But the Wallabies are going home. They have lost seven straight games to England. Cheika's contract is up. You do the maths.

"I was supposed to get this done for the people here and for Australians. I'm so disappointed," Cheika said, seemingly close to tears.

Cheika clobbered the table in front of him early in the game after Australia gave away a scrum inside their own 22, and five minutes later his team were two tries behind, the estimable Jonny May marking his 50th cap with a double.

As Brexit debating went into overdrive in the UK Parliament, England certainly needed no left-wing amendment. They were happy, too, for this particular May to crack on with getting a deal done.

The Leicester flyer dashed in by the corner flag both times, firstly from close range after a patient build-up and on the second occasion when David Pocock handed over possession and Henry Slade charged from midfield before kicking through for England's bolting number 11 to gather.

Australia had an 11 who could dash for the line too, and when Marika Koroibete took advantage of tremendous work from Reece Hodge and Jordan Petaia to bound down the left for a try that Christian Lealiifano converted, it was a one-point game early in the second half. Hope for Cheika and his men, but not for long.

Prop Kyle Sinckler exploited a gap in Australia's defence to trundle through for a swift riposte, and Australia were then booted out of the game by the outstanding kicking game of England captain Owen Farrell. Anthony Watson piled on the agony with another try. Mercifully the TV cameras allowed Cheika to wallow in private grief this time.

With Jones and Cheika, there was a sense of soap-opera histrionics about their pre-match sparring, the possibility that this apparent long-standing great friendship - Jones described Cheika as "my good old mate" ahead of this game - may not be quite all it was cracked up to be.

Australians have made a roaring trade from exporting soap operas for global consumption, of course, and it was no great stretch to imagine Jones and Cheika squabbling over day-to-day mundanities in, say, the long-running Neighbours saga.

Mulish to a fault, you could equate them to that garrulous hepcat Lou Carpenter and Salvation Army field marshal Harold Bishop, long-time "good old mates" whose own friendship was put under intense pressure by another rivalry for the ages.

Just as Carpenter and Bishop fought tooth, nail and tuba solo for the affections of Madge Ramsey, so there was one thing standing between Jones and Cheika’s old pals' act on Saturday: it was a day to go hard or go home.

Erstwhile team-mates, Cheika had a beef this week about Jones bringing Aussie Ricky Stuart into the England camp over the past week. Why, Cheika seemed to question, are so many leading Australian coaches working with England teams, whether in rugby, cricket, indeed anywhere across the sporting spectrum?

The swaggering, wily Jones had struck another blow at the heart of Australia. Cheika was rattled by the master wind-up merchant, ensnared by another supremely executed trap.

The irony amid Australian post-match hand-wringing is that Jones is fancied in some quarters to take over from Cheika for what would be a second stint with the Wallabies. He was described as "the obvious solution" - as well as an "arch little pinprick" - in a Sydney Morning Herald editorial on Saturday morning.

Jones has often said he fancies retiring to Barbados once his time with England is up, yet he said the same during his Japan tenure.

The reality is that he lives for days such as this.

Australia need the sort of rebuilding job England faced after the last World Cup. They have lost to England and Wales, where four years ago hosts England were beaten by Australia and Wales.

Whether Australia could tempt 59-year-old Jones again is a different question. They need him surely more than he needs them.

With a Cheshire cat grin for the cameras and a brief pat on the back for Cheika, Jones is all about England for now as he turns his focus to Yokohama and a semi-final next Saturday, another coach and another team in his sights.

A disconsolate Michael Cheika hailed his Australia players as "a credit to their country" after the Wallabies were dumped out of the Rugby World Cup at the quarter-final stage by England.

Despite starting superbly in Oita, the 1991 and 1999 world champions were ultimately thumped 40-16 as England defended superbly before pulling clear in the second half.

Australia head coach Cheika is widely expected to leave his role, having failed to oversee a repeat of the team's run to the final in 2015.

The 52-year-old cut a distraught figure in his immediate post-match interview, but he made a point of highlighting his team's commitment to the cause.

"I think the lads put everything they had into it today," said Cheika. "I want all the Aussies at home and over here to know that. They gave it everything; they put their bodies on the line.

"We made a few mistakes at different times, but they've given everything, these lads ... and they're a credit to their country."

Australia had more possession throughout Saturday's contest but could only manage one try, through Marika Koroibete, while England crossed four times courtesy of Jonny May (2), Kyle Sinckler and Anthony Watson.

"I thought we actually played quite well, especially the first 50-60 [minutes]," Cheika reasoned.

"We gave away two intercepts and they [England] defended well like you've got to, so the better team won.

"That's the way it is, you've got to suck that up sometimes. I was supposed to get this done for the people here and for Australians. I'm so disappointed."

Wallabies skipper Michael Hooper added: "We're really upset. We emptied everything into this and we didn't get it done, which is pretty gutting for a lot of reasons.

"Firstly, there's a lot of our guys who are leaving. Secondly, we had a great supporter base over here to push us along and we really felt it along the way. To not be able to do it for them and ourselves is pretty gutting."

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