Australia defeated Pakistan by a mammoth innings and five runs in the opening Test at the Gabba on Sunday.

Pakistan were bowled out for 335 in their second innings as Australia wrapped up victory inside four days in Brisbane.

Despite Babar Azam's brilliant century and a 95-run knock from Mohammad Rizwan, Australia were not to be denied – paceman Josh Hazlewood leading the way with figures of 4-63.

Pakistan resumed on 64-3 and faced a heavy defeat after man of the match Marnus Labuschagne and David Warner put Australia in a dominant position at 580, in reply to Pakistan's first-innings 240.

Babar (104) provided some resistance after Pat Cummins (2-69) and Hazlewood had struck in the morning session to reduce Pakistan to 94-5 – Shan Masood (42) and Iftikhar Ahmed (0) the victims.

A second Test hundred for Babar thwarted Australia, while he also combined for a 132-run sixth-wicket stand with Rizwan.

But after a two-and-a-half resistance between the pair, spinner Nathan Lyon (1-74) finally broke through to send Babar back to the pavilion, with the tourists 226-6.

Yasir Shah (42) came to the middle and put on 79 runs with Rizwan as the duo fought to prolong the Test into a fifth and final day.

But when Rizwan fell to Hazlewood, the writing was on the wall as Aussie quick Mitchell Starc (3-73) helped close out proceedings.

Marnus Labuschagne said scoring his first Test century was a dream come true, although the Australia batsman's celebration was not as he envisaged on day three against Pakistan.

Labuschagne struck a magnificent career-best 185 on his home ground after David Warner was dismissed for 154 on another dominant day for Tim Paine's side at the Gabba.

Pakistan closed on 64-3 in their second innings, trailing by 276 and facing a heavy defeat in the first match of the series in Brisbane.

Labuschagne was on cloud nine after reaching three figures for the first time in the longest format.

He said: "It's a dream come true. It was set up by the boys at the start and I was able to capitalise on that.

"It's a privilege to play with this hat on and ... if I can score runs along the way, that's great."

The South Africa-born 25-year-old spoke of his relief at bringing up his hundred, hence his reaction to reaching the landmark.

"You don't want to drift, you try and stay in the moment, but you can't help but think 'imagine if you get your first Test century, home ground...' said Labuschagne.

"It was amazing. Leading up to when I got it, I was sort of thinking 'stay patient, they are going to come, you'll get your shot'. I said to myself if it's up there and it's full I'm going to have a crack at it. 

"It was greedy, I tried to go too square and got a thick edge through the gully region and then it was just looking back to see it just trickle along the ground and I thought 'thank you'. 

"You always think as a kid, how am I going to celebrate a hundred? That was nothing like I thought, my emotion took over, it was very exciting and a dream come true."

 

David Warner insists pressure was never an issue for him despite admitting the Ashes had been a "failure".

The often explosive batsman showed his talent on the second day of Australia's first Test with Pakistan, closing on 151 not out as the hosts reached 312-1 to lead by 72 runs at the Gabba. 

It was a remarkable knock from a man who managed just 95 runs in the Test series against England, where Stuart Broad proved his nemesis. 

But even in the wake of that torrid time, Warner claims he never lost faith in his own ability. 

"I don't feel under pressure at all," he said after posting his 22nd Test century. "For me it's about going out there and backing my ability. 

"If you get selected or don't get selected you've got to accept that. The Ashes for me was a failure but I know what I'm capable of doing.

"I was on the end of a great series by a very good bowler. There was nothing more I could do. I wasn't out of form, I was out of runs. 

"Today I had a little bit of luck. That's what you need in the game. Over there I didn't have much luck at all."

Warner endured some tough treatment in England, and not just from Broad, as the home fans were not shy in reminding him of his involvement in the ball-tampering scandal.

That indiscretion led to a 12-month ban from the sport and Warner used that time to remind himself what matters most.

"To have that time off and the time to reflect, and just get away from the game ... there is a lot more to life than just cricket," he said.

"I really just loved the time I spent home with my family. You don't get that when you're travelling all the time. I really enjoyed that time off.

"Obviously I'm back now and I've got to keep working hard and keep being respectful of the game because it can bite you on the backside very fast."

David Warner hit an unbeaten century as Australia piled on the pain for Pakistan on day two of the first Test in Brisbane.

Warner posted his 22nd Test ton and fourth against Pakistan in a star display at the Gabba, where his 151 not out led Australia to 312-1 – a lead of 72 runs.

Australia star Warner had not reached triple figures in the longest form of the game since the 2017 Boxing Day Test against England – a one-year suspension for his role in the ball-tampering scandal derailing the batsman.

But Warner – who only managed 95 runs during a forgettable Ashes series in England – ended his wait for a hundred in the final session of the day after 180 deliveries.

Joe Burns was the only batsman to fall on the second day as Australia dominated – the opener falling three runs shy of a century after trying to sweep Yasir Shah (1-101).

After Pakistan were dismissed for 240 on Thursday, Warner and Burns took to the crease in warm conditions against the tourists, and they showed their prowess atop the order.

Warner survived a life on 56, when 16-year-old debutant Naseem Shah (0-65) thought he had his first international wicket, but the teenager heartbreakingly overstepped for a no-ball and the Australian was called back.

He also came close to being run out on 93, but Warner managed to make it back to his crease by centimetres, before completing a memorable ton after tea.

Warner and Burns combined for 222 until the latter was sent back to the pavilion.

Marnus Labuschagne (55 not out) was also spared late in the day when Haris Sohail's delivery flew past Asad Shafiq, while Warner's stump was hit by Shaheen Afridi (0-44) but the bails did not fall – capping a long and forgettable day for Pakistan.

Josh Hazlewood hopes his dismissal of Babar Azam can set the tone for the series after Australia dismissed Pakistan for 240 on day one of the first Test.

Babar is a man in form but survived just four deliveries before falling victim to a full and wide one from Hazlewood, edging into the hands of Joe Burns at first slip.

It was an ill-judged shot that limited Babar's first-innings contribution at the Gabba to just one run, and Hazlewood wants to restrict his input across both matches.

"It's huge to try to stay on top of him, for sure," Hazlewood said, having helped to check Pakistan's progress after they reached 75 without loss in Brisbane.  

"He's probably coming off T20 cricket as well and we know he's a stroke-maker and he certainly likes to put the pressure back on you as a bowler. 

"I feel if you can get him early, you can get a rash shot like that sometimes.

"If he drives for four, he's sort of away as well in his game. So it can go both ways there, but we were lucky enough to get the nick and hopefully stay on top of him for the series."

Hazlewood claimed figures of 2-46, while Mitchell Starc starred with the ball as he took 4-52.

Among Starc's scalps was Naseem Shah, Pakistan's 16-year-old debutant who had earlier dug in to deny the bowler a hat-trick.

Naseem, far more at home with the ball in hand, will now hope to stifle the hosts' reply on Friday. 

Mitchell Starc and Pat Cummins starred as Australia knocked over Pakistan on the stroke of stumps on day one of the opening Test.

Starc claimed four wickets – including the final dismissal of the innings – and Cummins finished with three as Pakistan were bowled out for 240 at the Gabba on Thursday.

After losing five wickets in a middle-session collapse, Pakistan battled back via Mohammad Rizwan (37) and Yasir Shah (26) until losing 0-3 as Australia made the most of the second new ball in Brisbane.

Pakistan batted first after winning the toss, and it looked to be a wise decision as the tourists frustrated Australia's attack.

Despite a couple of early shouts, Pakistan impressed with captain Azhar Ali (39) and Shan Masood (27) at the crease – the pair making it to lunch unscathed on 57-0.

Azhar and Shan became the first tourists to bat through the opening session of a Test at the Gabba without lunch.

But Australia turned the screws on Pakistan after lunch as Josh Hazlewood (2-46), Cummins (3-60) and Starc (4-52) ripped through the top order.

After Pakistan reached 75-0 shortly after the break, Australia took 4-3 in a stunning seven-over blitz – Cummins setting the tone.

Cummins, the world's number one Test bowler, made the breakthrough with an angling delivery, which removed Shaan, who edged through to Steve Smith at slips.

The floodgates opened from that point as Hazlewood struck to dismiss Azhar – his 100th Test wicket on Australian soil – and then Babar Azam (1).

Starc sent Haris Sohail back to the pavilion caught behind for one, while Iftikhar Ahmed (7) was the last wicket to fall before lunch after inside-edging a Nathan Lyon (1-40) delivery to Marnus Labuschagne.

Resuming on 125-5 following tea, Rizwan came out with intent – hitting Cummins for three boundaries in one over.

Rizwan, however, was unfortunate after he was controversially caught behind on a Cummins delivery which appeared to be a no-ball.

But Pakistan dug deep and looked set to see out the day with four wickets in hand, until Australia took the new ball and Starc claimed back-to-back scalps as the lights came on, with 16-year-old debutant Naseem Shah (7) preventing a hat-trick prior to being caught and bowled at the death.

Ben Simmons said it felt good for his hard work to pay off after the Philadelphia 76ers star drained his first NBA three-pointer.

Simmons ended his long wait for a regular-season three as the 76ers topped the New York Knicks 109-104 on Wednesday.

The number one pick in the 2016 draft, All-Star guard Simmons had attempted 17 shots from beyond the arc in the league, with much made about his jump shot and unwillingness to shoot the three.

Simmons, however, made a three-pointer in the opening quarter against the Knicks – his 172nd game in the NBA.

"It feels good to put work in in the summer and it pays off," Simmons said post-game in Philadelphia midweek.

Wells Fargo Center erupted as fans and team-mates celebrated Simmons' maiden three-pointer.

Sixers head coach Brett Brown added: "Like I've said for a while now, other people get more excited about it than I do. But how can that not be a good thing? And, really, if we're all honest, that's the first legitimate sort of three he's taken.

"A lot of them have been heaves at the end of periods, and stuff like that. But I think his footwork, his confidence, he rose up and he didn't blink. He looked great."

There has been plenty of talk about Brown, who is reportedly finalising a deal to coach Australia at the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

Brown – who spent time coaching in Australia prior to his move to the San Antonio Spurs – previously led the Boomers to the 2012 Olympic Games quarter-finals.

After sitting out this year's FIBA World Cup in China, Simmons said of Brown: "I'm excited. I'm looking forward to it.

"He's coaching me now, so we have a great relationship. I've known him my whole life. I'm excited to put together a great team."

Pakistan captain Azhar Ali has high hopes for Naseem Shah as the 16-year-old prepares to make his Test debut against Australia.

Azhar praised the seamer's technical abilities and mental strength after the teenager suffered a personal tragedy following the recent death of his mother.

Although Pakistan's line-up for the clash at the Gabba is yet to be revealed, Azhar confirmed Naseem would be involved and he has high hopes for the youngster.

"Not many players can be at that standard so early but there are exceptions and he is one of them," said the skipper ahead of the two-match series. 

"And hopefully – we are all looking forward to it – he can have a very successful career.

"When I saw him first, I was so surprised. The control he had, the pace he had – and the temperament and the composure when he bowls is so exciting to see."

Naseem, who will become the youngest male Test debutant on Australian soil, played in a warm-up match in the aftermath of his mother's passing and Azhar paid credit to his courage.

"Obviously, it was a hard time for him but he coped with it very nicely and he came out and bowled the very next day, which is very heartening," he said.

"He is opening up a little bit. Obviously, when he came in to first-class cricket, he was a bit shy but now he is starting to enjoy it."

Pakistan have not won a Test match in Australia since 1995 and have never triumphed in a series there in the longest format. 

Pakistan captain Azhar Ali has high hopes for Naseem Shah as the 16-year-old prepares to make his Test debut against Australia.

Azhar praised the seamer's technical abilities and mental strength after the teenager suffered a personal tragedy following the recent death of his mother.

Although Pakistan's line-up for the clash at the Gabba is yet to be revealed, Azhar confirmed Naseem would be involved and he has high hopes for the youngster.

"Not many players can be at that standard so early but there are exceptions and he is one of them," said the skipper ahead of the two-match series. 

"And hopefully – we are all looking forward to it – he can have a very successful career.

"When I saw him first, I was so surprised. The control he had, the pace he had – and the temperament and the composure when he bowls is so exciting to see."

Naseem, who is will become the youngest male Test debutant on Australian soil, played in a warm-up match in the aftermath of his mother's passing and Azhar paid credit to his courage.

"Obviously, it was a hard time for him but he coped with it very nicely and he came out and bowled the very next day, which is very heartening," he said.

"He is opening up a little bit. Obviously, when he came in to first-class cricket, he was a bit shy but now he is starting to enjoy it."

Pakistan have not won a Test match in Australia since 1995 and have never triumphed in a series there in the longest format. 

Rugby Australia (RA) chief executive Raelene Castle said discussions were held with England head coach Eddie Jones before the Wallabies appointed Dave Rennie.

RA confirmed the appointment of New Zealander and Glasgow Warriors boss Rennie as Michael Cheika's replacement on Wednesday.

Cheika vacated his position following Australia's quarter-final defeat to England at the Rugby World Cup in Japan.

A return to Australia was touted for Jones, who was sacked by the Wallabies in 2005, but Castle revealed it was too difficult to prise the 59-year-old from England.

"We had discussions with Eddie," she told a news conference for Rennie's appointment midweek.

"But he was contracted to England, and tightly contracted, which ruled him out."

Rennie – a two-time Super Rugby-winning coach with the Chiefs – is the second New Zealander to coach the Wallabies, following in the footsteps of Robbie Deans.

Deans took over in 2007 and he guided Australia to third place at the 2011 World Cup before being axed in 2013.

Having been encouraged to apply for the All Blacks vacancy following Steve Hansen's exit, Rennie told Rugby.com.au: "I'm a proud Kiwi but the big thing is I've been talking to Australia for a lot of months and the All Blacks interest came in late in the piece and by that stage, we'd done a lot of homework, we were really excited about the opportunity to go to Australia and that ended up being an easy decision."

Rennie, who will not arrive until July, added: "I think Australians want their national team coached by an Australian and I'm OK with that.

"Hopefully, they're feeling that way because they care about Aussie rugby and all I can say is everywhere I've gone I've immersed myself in the community and the culture.

"I guess we'll be judged by what we do as opposed to what I say now but I can assure you that I care about he future of Australian rugby, going to work really hard to get a strong connection with the Super Rugby coaches and a national age grade coaches to ensure we've got good young talent through and good pathways for them."

Dave Rennie will become the Wallabies' new head coach, Rugby Australia have confirmed, though he will not start in the role until July 2020.

Rennie, who will complete his commitments with Glasgow Warriors before taking charge next year, has signed a deal running through to the 2023 Rugby World Cup.

The 55-year-old New Zealander won back-to-back Super Rugby titles with the Chiefs before heading to Europe to continue his coaching career, having previously had a spell in charge of the All Blacks' Under-20 team.

His appointment ends the search to find a replacement for Michael Cheika, whose tenure came to an end with Australia's quarter-final defeat to England at this year's World Cup in Japan.

Rugby Australia chief executive Raelene Castle confirmed Rennie was their preferred candidate, while also announcing director of rugby Scott Johnson will take charge of the national team in the short term.

"This is a massive coup for Australian rugby. Dave Rennie was the clear standout candidate for the job, and we're thrilled to have secured his services," Castle said in a statement.

"Dave's coaching philosophy focuses equally on football and team culture, the key pillars to building sustainable success in any team. He has a proven track record in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere.

"Given incumbent head coach Michael Cheika had indicated in early 2019 the possibility that he would not seek re-appointment for the role, we needed to identify a list of candidates that would be available to us, and suitable to work within our new high performance framework. This search has been ongoing for the past six months.

"When Michael then confirmed he would not seek re-appointment following our Rugby World Cup exit, we moved to appoint our preferred candidate."

Dave Rennie will become the Wallabies' new head coach, Rugby Australia have confirmed, though he will not start in the role until July 2020.

A Nicholas Pooran-less West Indies did not have the power to deal with Afghanistan over the course of a three-match T20I series, the wicketkeeper/batsman missing out while he serves a four-match ban over ball tampering.

Steve Smith, who had been banned for a year for the part he played in a ball-tampering scandal, lost his captaincy of Australia, and is only months back with the side.

Pooran was only banned for four games but Smith doesn’t feel the talented middle-order batsman should be punished anymore harshly.

"Everyone is different, every board is different, and the way they deal with certain issues. For me, I copped it on the chin... it is what it is,” he said.

Smith expects a better Pooran to come out of the embarrassment of being caught cheating.

“I know Nicholas, I've played a bit of cricket with him and he's a talented player and someone with a bright future," Smith said.

"I think he'll learn from his mistake and move past it,” he said.

I played with him in the Caribbean league at Barbados. I think he's going to be an exceptional player in white-ball cricket."

Steve Smith insists there are no hard feelings towards West Indies batsman Nicholas Pooran despite his relatively lenient four-match ban for ball tampering.

Australia's skipper at the time, Smith, along with vice-captain David Warner and team-mate Cameron Bancroft, received a long suspension for his role in the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa in March 2018.

Smith and Warner did not play for a year following sanctions handed out by Cricket Australia, with Bancroft returning after nine months.

Meanwhile, Pooran, who admitted to changing the condition of the ball in a one-dayer against Afghanistan, will miss four games after being punished by the International Cricket Council.

The Windies will soon have Pooran available again, but Smith would prefer not to reflect upon the contrasting punishments.

"Everyone is different, every [cricket] board is different with the way they deal with certain issues," Smith said. "For me, I copped it on the chin. It is what it is.

"I don't feel hard done by. It was a long time ago now. I've moved past it and I'm focusing on the present.

"I know Nicholas, I've played a bit of cricket with him, and he's a talented player and someone with a bright future.

"I think he'll learn from his mistake and move past it. I think he's going to be an exceptional player in white-ball cricket."

Australia legend Shane Warne is "disappointed" to see James Pattinson miss the first Test against Pakistan through suspension but feels the team are in decent nick ahead of the series.

Paceman Pattinson was found guilty of a level two breach of Cricket Australia's code of conduct for abuse of an opposition player in the Sheffield Shield.

The incident, which occurred in Victoria's clash with Queensland in Melbourne, marked a third breach in 18 months, which triggered two suspension points and a one-match ban meaning he will miss the Brisbane Test that starts this week.

Warne, Australia's leading wicket taker in Test cricket, would have had Pattinson in his line-up.

"It's disappointing, I'd pencilled him in for the first Test," Warne told reporters. 

"I thought he was okay in the Ashes, not at his best, but he did a good job. I still think he's in our best three fast bowlers, though, when he's at his best.

"So, really disappointed to lose him before the Gabba, I think that would have suited him. [Josh] Hazlewood and [Pat] Cummins pick themselves, they're as good as anybody in the world those two, and then Pattinson I thought with Nathan Lyon is such a fantastic combination, there's so much variety and just relentless pressure with those three. 

"It's a huge loss. It probably means Mitchell Starc will play, he's in good form as well. It's great to have those competition for spots - because it's not easy you don't just pencil in 'this is who we've got', we've got choices.

"It's probably the first time in a while we've had choices with fast bowlers, first time we've got choices with batsmen - so I think Australian cricket is in pretty good shape, I thought they did well in England."

Australia are about to embark on a home summer having spent much of the year in England for the Cricket World Cup and the Ashes.

A run to the World Cup semi-finals was followed by the tourists retaining the urn in a drawn 2-2 series and Warne feels the side have decent form.

"I was disappointed to lose the last [group] game against South Africa in the World Cup, I reckon if we'd have beaten South Africa and ended up on top and played New Zealand it could have been a different World Cup," he added. 

"It would have been nice to win 3-1 in the Ashes, I thought we deserved to win that rather than 2-2, but a fantastic English summer for the Aussies, World Cup semi-final and retaining the urn was pretty good so they're in good form leading into first Test match."

On the make-up of the squad, Warne was surprised to see Cameron Bancroft selected after he made just 44 runs across two matches in the Ashes but was happy on the whole.

"I would have liked to see Marcus Harris included, I thought he deserved another chance, he's been in pretty good form," Warne said.

"Joe Burns, I like that selection. A little surprised with Cameron Bancroft being in the squad. Whether he gets the nod we'll have to wait and see, a little surprised after his form against England."

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