Madison Keys ended Simona Halep's chances of reaching another Western & Southern Open final, while Naomi Osaka and Ashleigh Barty battled through.

A three-time runner-up in Cincinnati, Halep was edged by Keys at the WTA Premier event on Thursday.

The Romanian became the first top-four seed to fall, with Barty, Osaka and Karolina Pliskova booking their spots in the quarter-finals.

 

KEYS EDGES HALEP IN THRILLER

Keys, the American 16th seed, served 10 aces on her way to a 6-1 3-6 7-5 victory over fourth seed Halep in the third round.

Halep came from 3-0 down in the final set and saved a match point in the 10th game, but Keys broke again to claim her win.

Having lost finals in Cincinnati in 2015, 2017 and 2018, Halep fell short of reaching another decider.

Keys will face Venus Williams after the American veteran beat Donna Vekic 2-6 6-3 6-3.

 

BARTY, OSAKA MOVE THROUGH

Barty was pushed before getting past Anett Kontaveit 4-6 7-5 7-5 in two hours, 10 minutes.

The Australian found herself 5-3 down in the final set before winning four straight games to advance.

Barty will meet Maria Sakkari, who upset Belarusian ninth seed Aryna Sabalenka 6-7 (4-7) 6-4 6-4.

Osaka was also forced to three sets by Hsieh Su-wei before claiming a 7-6 (7-3) 5-7 6-2 victory.

Awaiting the Japanese star in the last eight is Sofia Kenin, who beat Elina Svitolina for the second time in as many tournaments with a 6-3 7-6 (7-3) victory.

 

PLISKOVA, KUZNETSOVA PROGRESS

Pliskova, the 2016 champion, is yet to drop a set and was too good for qualifier Rebecca Peterson 7-5 6-4.

The Czech will meet Svetlana Kuznetsova after the 34-year-old wildcard crushed Sloane Stephens 6-1 6-2.

Naomi Osaka and Simona Halep battled into the last 16 at the Western & Southern Open, while Ashleigh Barty crushed Maria Sharapova.

Osaka is back at world number one and the Japanese star moved through her second-round match at the WTA Premier event in Cincinnati on Wednesday.

Like Osaka, Halep – a three-time runner-up – was tested, while Barty needed less than 90 minutes to thrash Sharapova.

 

OSAKA, HALEP PUSHED TO THREE

Osaka needed more than two hours to overcome Aliaksandra Sasnovich 7-6 (7-3) 2-6 6-2 in the second round.

She had won her previous three meetings with the Belarusian in straight sets, but was pushed at the hard-court tournament.

Osaka will next face Hsieh Su-wei, who got past qualifier Jennifer Brady 7-6 (11-9) 6-3.

Halep, a finalist at the event in 2015, 2017 and 2018, came from a set and a break down to beat Ekaterina Alexandrova 3-6 7-5 6-4.

The Romanian will meet Madison Keys, who eased past Daria Kasatkina 6-4 6-1.

 

BARTY BRUSHES PAST SHARAPOVA

A surprise last-32 loser at the Rogers Cup, Barty dominated Sharapova in a 6-4 6-1 victory.

The Australian broke serve four times during her 40th win of the season while continuing Sharapova's rough 2019.

Sharapova, a five-time grand slam champion, holds just an 8-6 win-loss record in 2019.

Barty will meet Anett Kontaveit, who was too good for Polish teenager Iga Swiatek 6-4 7-6 (7-2).

 

PLISKOVA, SVITOLINA THROUGH ON GOOD DAY FOR SEEDS

Champion in 2016, Karolina Pliskova was untroubled by Wang Yafan, winning 6-1 6-3.

Meanwhile, Aryna Sabalenka, the ninth seed, cruised past Zheng Saisai 6-4 6-3.

Elina Svitolina will face Sofia Kenin after their 6-4 6-1 wins over Elise Mertens and Zarina Diyas respectively, while Sloane Stephens and Donna Vekic – who beat Victoria Azarenka – progressed along with Svetlana Kuznetsova and Rebecca Peterson.

Naomi Osaka was offered a dose of reality after her winning start against Serena Williams was ended, but the Japanese claimed defeat meant she "accomplished [her] dream".

Two-time grand slam champion Osaka will return to the world number one ranking next week, yet she crashed out of the Rogers Cup on Friday in a 6-3 6-4 defeat to Williams.

The all-time WTA great is an icon for Osaka; however, the 21-year-old had won their only two prior meetings - including an incredible US Open final in which Williams repeatedly ranted at the officials.

Humbled this week in Toronto, Osaka acknowledged this loss belatedly provided the experience she had always anticipated when facing Williams.

"For me, it's always fun to play her," she told a news conference. "This is someone that I looked up to forever.

"And, actually, this is how I thought the first time I played her in Miami was going to go.

"So in a weird way, losing today, I accomplished my dream. I know that sounds kind of weird, but if there's anyone in the world that I would want to lose to - of course I would never want to lose - I don't mind losing to her, because I learned a lot.

"And this is someone that I kind of modelled my game after when I was little. So this is such a big learning experience for me."

Osaka said Williams played "amazing, which is what she does", and the victor agreed her level had improved from the pair of 2018 defeats.

"I knew [Osaka's] game a little bit more, so that's a little easier," Williams said. "And I'm just overall a little bit better. You know, last year was a miraculous year for me, to be honest.

"So I know her game. I watch her a lot. I knew what I needed to do to hopefully try to get a win today, and it helped a little bit."

As Williams advances to face Marie Bouzkova, Osaka will work to defend her restored ranking more successfully than last time.

Osaka's form fell off a cliff after taking number one with the Australian Open title and she later conceded the pressure had been tough to handle.

She explained on Friday: "I guess I'm excited. But also, at the same time, I feel like that's a position that I think requires a lot of work and a lot of just hardheadedness.

"I can't really let what other people say affect me, and I just have to keep working hard and putting effort. I think that the results, of course, will show, but I have to not think too much about winning or losing."

Serena Williams is the last seed standing at the Rogers Cup as defending champion Simona Halep made a quarter-final exit on Friday.

Williams was in impressive form as she powered past Naomi Osaka in their first meeting since last year's controversial US Open final.

The American great is the only seed into the last four, with Halep's title defence coming to an end at the WTA Premier tournament.

 

WILLIAMS WONDERFUL AGAINST OSAKA

Williams has apologised for her meltdown at Flushing Meadows last year and the 23-time grand slam champion produced a brilliant display against Osaka.

Osaka had won her previous two matches against Williams in straight sets, but the 37-year-old secured a 6-3 6-4 victory over the Japanese star on Friday.

Williams may have been expecting to face Halep in a rematch of their Wimbledon final, but the Romanian bowed out against Marie Bouzkova.

The Czech qualifier continued her run, winning the first set 6-4 when Halep retired injured.

PLISKOVA, SVITOLINA STUNNED

Karolina Pliskova also exited in the quarter-finals, suffering a 6-0 2-6 6-4 loss to Canadian Bianca Andreescu.

That result meant Osaka, who later lost to Williams, will replace Ashleigh Barty atop the world rankings.

Andreescu will face Sofia Kenin after the American upset Ukrainian sixth seed Elina Svitolina 7-6 (7-2) 6-4.

At 37, Williams is by far the oldest player left in the draw, with the others – Bouzkova (21), Andreescu (19) and Kenin (20) all under 22.

Serena Williams produced a brilliant display to claim a straight-sets win over Naomi Osaka in the Rogers Cup quarter-finals on Friday.

In the first meeting between the stars since last year's controversial US Open final, Williams was in impressive form, recording a 6-3 6-4 victory in Toronto.

Williams' meltdown at Flushing Meadows during the decider in 2018 overshadowed what was Osaka's first grand slam success.

The 23-time grand slam champion has since apologised and, in their first meeting since, Williams delivered an impeccable performance at the WTA Premier tournament.

Impacted by slow starts this week, Williams made a better opening to her clash with Japanese star Osaka, who had to dig out of a hole at 2-3.

However, Osaka – playing more tentatively in windy conditions – sent a forehand long to give Williams, a three-time winner of the tournament, a break in the eighth game.

Williams took the set with a big serve and then broke again in the third game of the second set as Osaka, who will return to top spot in the rankings, struggled to find answers.

The American had lost her previous two meetings with Osaka, but managed to close out what was an impressive victory.

Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka will go head-to-head for the first time since the controversial 2018 US Open decider after the pair reached the Rogers Cup quarter-finals.

Osaka prevailed against childhood hero Williams last year at Flushing Meadows, where the 23-time grand slam champion's epic meltdown contributed to her defeat.

Williams was issued a code violation for what umpire Carlos Ramos deemed to be coaching from Patrick Mouratoglou, irritating the former world number one who insisted she was not a cheat.

A point penalty for racquet abuse led to her branding Ramos a "liar" and a "thief" and she was then docked a game, after which she called for the match referee and alleged she was being treated differently to male players.

Osaka's maiden major was overshadowed by Williams' behaviour. Now, the two players are set for a rematch in Toronto.

 

SERENA SURVIVES ALEXANDROVA TEST

The 37-year-old American star was pushed by Ekaterina Alexandrova in a 7-5 6-4 victory on Thursday.

Williams trailed the Russian qualifier 3-0 in the first and 3-1 in the second, however, the eighth seed produced when it mattered most to advance at the WTA Premier event.

A three-time champion, Williams – playing for the first time since Wimbledon – said: "I definitely feel like it takes a while to get back into the rhythm, because we've had a long season of just clay and then grass, and now we're on hard courts. So it definitely feels different, especially for me now. Usually I don't feel that huge of a difference, but for whatever reason I do this year."

 

OSAKA ON TRACK TO RECLAIM TOP RANKING

Australian Open champion and second seed Osaka overcame teenager Iga Swiatek 7-6 (7-4) 6-4 in the last 16.

Osaka rallied from a break and two set points down to eventually prevail against the Polish 18-year-old.

The Japanese star is on track to return to the WTA's summit on Monday ahead of Karolina Pliskova, who must beat Bianca Andreescu to have any chance of claiming the top ranking.

Pliskova accounted for Anett Kontaveit 6-3 7-5, while Andreescu outlasted Kiki Bertens 6-1 6-7 (7-9) 6-4.

 

HALEP'S TITLE DEFENCE ALIVE

Defending champion Simona Halep eased past Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-2 6-1 in just 67 minutes.

Halep – the fourth seed – was a class above as she reached the Rogers Cup quarters for the fifth time.

Next up for Halep is qualifier Marie Bouzkova, who stunned former French Open champion Jelena Ostapenko 6-2 6-2.

Sixth seed Elina Svitolina and Sofia Kenin also moved through to the last eight.

Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka eased into the last 16 at the Rogers Cup, while Simona Halep survived a scare on Wednesday.

Williams, a three-time champion at the WTA Premier event, was in good form in her first appearance since Wimbledon, beating Elise Mertens in the second round.

Osaka moved a step closer to reclaiming the number one ranking, while Halep edged through.

 

SUPER SERENA, OSAKA CLOSE TO TOP

Williams, the eighth seed, came from a break down in each set to get past Mertens 6-3 6-3.

The American 23-time grand slam champion was in decent form against Mertens, who troubled Williams at different times.

Meanwhile, Ashleigh Barty will lose the top ranking after Osaka booked her spot in the third round.

Osaka took the first set over Tatjana Maria 6-2 before the German qualifier retired.

It means the Japanese star or Karolina Pliskova will replace Barty, who lost on Tuesday, atop the world rankings.

HALEP SURVIVES SCARE

Halep, the defending champion, moved through but only just, edging Jennifer Brady.

The Romanian fourth seed and Wimbledon champion overcame the qualifier 4-6 7-5 7-6 (7-5) after almost two and a half hours.

It was a good day for the seeds – Pliskova and Elina Svitolina advancing with the likes of Belinda Bencic and Anett Kontaveit.

Pliskova's bid to return to the top of the rankings is alive after a 6-4 6-7 (4-7) 6-2 victory over qualifier Alison Riske.

Svitolina, meanwhile, battled past Katerina Siniakova 6-3 3-6 6-3.

 

WOE FOR WOZNIACKI

The only seed to depart was Wozniacki, who fell to 18-year-old qualifier Iga Swiatek 1-6 6-3 6-4.

Wozniacki, the 2010 champion and 2017 runner-up, led 3-0 in the final set before losing six of the final seven games to the Polish teenager.

Naomi Osaka has described the period since her Australian Open triumph as "the worst months of my life", but the former world number one says she is now looking to the future with optimism.

After claiming her maiden grand slam title in stunning fashion at last year's US Open, Osaka also triumphed in Melbourne in January, sealing top spot in the WTA rankings as a result.

However, the Japanese has since struggled, conceding her number-one ranking to French Open winner Ashleigh Barty and losing in the first round at Wimbledon last month.

In a Twitter post on Thursday, ahead of her return to competitive action at next week's Rogers Cup, Osaka spoke openly about how tough the last few months have been, stating: "I probably haven't had fun playing tennis since Australia.

"[I'm] leaving to Toronto tomorrow and I wanted to get some things off my chest before the hard court swing begins.

"The last few months have been really rough for me tennis wise, but thankfully I'm surrounded by people I love and who love me back [hopefully hahaha].

"In that regard I'm very thankful for them because whenever things go wrong I blame myself 100 per cent, I have a tendency to shut down because I don't want to burden anyone with my thoughts or problems but they taught me to trust them and not take everything on by myself.

"Unexpectedly though the worst months of my life have also had some of the best moments 'cause I've met new people, and been able to do things that I've never even considered doing before.

"That being said I can honestly reflect and say I probably haven't had fun playing tennis since Australia and I'm finally coming to terms with that while relearning that fun feeling.

"I've put so much weight on the results of my matches instead of learning from them which is what I 'normally' do.

"Having this time to reflect and think [from losing in the 1st round lololol], I've learned a lot about myself and I feel like I grew so much as a person in this past year[s] so I'm really excited what the future looks like on and off the court.

"See you in the US swing - Update finished."

Serena Williams apologised to Naomi Osaka for her outburst in the US Open final but maintains the incident demonstrated the unequal treatment received by female and male competitors.

Williams went down 6-2 6-4 at Arthur Ashe Stadium last September as Osaka claimed her maiden grand slam success.

But it was her veteran opponent's reaction on the way to being denied a record-equalling 24th major triumph that stole the headlines, with Williams responding furiously to umpire Carlos Ramos handing her a game penalty after the official initially penalised her for a coaching violation.

In an article for Harper's Bazaar, the 37-year-old explained she took a long time to get over the defeat and started seeing a therapist. She concluded the potential impact upon Osaka was the root of her lingering disquiet, so reached out to the Japanese.

"Finally I realised that there was only one way for me to move forward. It was time for me to apologise to the person who deserved it the most," Williams wrote. "I started to type, slowly at first, then faster as if the words were flowing out of me."

Her message read: "Hey, Naomi! It's Serena Williams. As I said on the court, I am so proud of you and I am truly sorry. I thought I was doing the right thing in sticking up for myself. But I had no idea the media would pit us against each other.

"I would love the chance to live that moment over again. I am, was, and will always be happy for you and supportive of you. I would never, ever want the light to shine away from another female, specifically another black female athlete.

"I can't wait for your future, and believe me I will always be watching as a big fan! I wish you only success today and in the future. Once again, I am so proud of you. All my love, your fan, Serena."

In a response that reduced Williams to tears, Osaka stated, "People can misunderstand anger for strength because they can't differentiate between the two," and added, "No one has stood up for themselves the way you have and you need to continue trailblazing".

At the time, Williams complained to tournament referee Brian Earley that her punishment was disproportionate when set against male players who have behaved in the same way. Osaka's reply sharpened her focus on this.

"This incident—though excruciating for us to endure—exemplified how thousands of women in every area of the workforce are treated every day," she continued. "We are not allowed to have emotions, we are not allowed to be passionate. We are told to sit down and be quiet, which frankly is just not something I'm okay with.

"It's shameful that our society penalises women just for being themselves."

Reflecting upon her career struggles, Williams added: "In short, it's never been easy. But then I think of the next girl who is going to come along who looks like me, and I hope, 'Maybe, just maybe, my voice will help her'."

Osaka added this year's Australian Open to her haul, while Williams progressed to the semi-finals of Wimbledon on Tuesday with gripping 6-4 4-6 6-3 win over Alison Riske.

Ashleigh Barty insists she is feeling no added pressure at Wimbledon in her first tournament as the world number one.

The French Open champion succeeded Naomi Osaka as the WTA Tour's top-ranked player at the Birmingham Classic, with the Japanese having endured a miserable stint since her Australian Open success in January.

Osaka acknowledged ahead of Wimbledon the role of number one brought "way more stress and pressure than I could have imagined" and her poor form continued with a first-round defeat at the All England Club on Monday.

But Barty triumphed against Zheng Saisai in straight sets the following day and appears keen not to worry about her ranking.

"I think, for me, it's a little bit irrelevant," she said after the 6-4 6-2 win. "The only pressure I have is what I put on myself, making sure I'm doing all the right things, preparing in the right way.

"Ultimately, when we play our matches, we go out there and enjoy it. That's why we do all the work, all the practices, to go out there and enjoy competing."

She added: "The first round is always very tough. It took time to get used to the conditions and the beautiful court with the new roof.

"It feels incredible. It is a little bizarre [to be number one], but this sacred turf we get to play on, you have to enjoy every minute of it."

Barty will not look too far ahead, either, or allow herself to dream of a second consecutive grand slam title just yet.

"For me, it's a possibility," the Australian said. "But it's certainly not something we're thinking about.

"It's about going match by match, trying to do the best that I can in every single tennis match that we play here. If we can give ourselves the opportunity, that would be great."

Lindsay Davenport believes Naomi Osaka looks "lost and overwhelmed" after the two-time grand slam champion exited Wimbledon in the first round.

Osaka triumphed at both the US Open and the Australian Open but then saw her form desert her after becoming world number one in Melbourne.

She has not won a WTA Tour title since and followed up a third-round French Open defeat against Katerina Siniakova by losing to Yulia Putintseva in straight sets at the All England Club on Monday.

Osaka suggested before Wimbledon that she was glad to be out of the spotlight having lost her ranking to Roland Garros champion Ashleigh Barty, yet she again struggled in London.

And 1999 Wimbledon champion Davenport hopes Osaka can adjust and return to form soon.

"It's been hard to watch Osaka play from about mid-February of this year," she told Omnisport, speaking courtesy of HSBC, supporter of the Wimbledon Foundation's Official Ticket Resale Scheme.

"It was one of the most exciting stories to see her in New York last year, to see her in Melbourne this year, to see her get her second grand slam.

"She looks a little bit lost right now and, I think, a little bit overwhelmed from all the fame that came her way from being a two-time grand slam champion, a lot of endorsement deals, a lot of outside interest in her now.

"I think she's struggling to kind of understand her new world. And hopefully it translates to her improving on the tennis court. Everybody wants to see Osaka playing her best, happy, out on court, winning matches.

"But it just looks like right now it's one of those tough times. And everybody knows she's going to come back stronger. I just hope that it's sooner, rather than later."

Davenport believes Barty will be able to deal with the same pressure, though, backing her to win at Wimbledon.

"I think it's very possible Ash Barty wins her second grand slam here, and her second in a row," she said.

"Clay is her worst surface. She surprised everybody by being able to win the French. This is actually the time of year she wants to play her best.

"She thinks she's a great grass-court player, she likes to come to net, she's got a great game. I think it's very likely that she wins two in a row.

"That top portion of the draw, though, is very tough - with [Angelique] Kerber also in her section, Serena [Williams] as well. They were calling it, in the women's side, the 'group of death'.

"We'll see who's able to come through there, but I love Ashleigh's game, love how she's been able to handle it all.

"We've seen Osaka, seen all the pressure she's felt being the world number one and a grand slam champion. So far it hasn't hit Barty. That's a great sign, she's so relaxed about it."

Cori Gauff was in dreamland after the 15-year-old sent shockwaves around Wimbledon by beating Venus Williams, while an emotional Naomi Osaka crashed out on day one.

Gauff became the youngest player to qualify for the grass-court grand slam in the Open Era last week and stunned her idol Williams 6-4 6-4 in her first main-draw match at a major on Monday.

Osaka was unable to join American prospect Gauff in round two, Yulia Putintseva beating the second seed 7-6 (7-4) 6-2 at the All England Club.

Magdalena Rybarikova will be teenager Gauff's next opponent after the Slovakian toppled 10th seed Aryna Sabalenka 6-2 6-4.

Simona Halep was troubled by her knee and Achilles, but the former world number one battled past Aliaksandra Sasnovich 6-4 7-5, while third seed Karolina Pliskova and eighth seed Elina Svitolina defeated Zhu Lin and Daria Gavrilova respectively.

Caroline Garcia, Marketa Vondrousova and Daria Kasatkina were the other seeds to fall on the opening day at SW19.

 

CLASSY GAUFF EXPRESSES VENUS GRATITUDE

Gauff produced an astonishing performance on the renovated No.1 Court and the world number 313 was reduced to tears after dumping out 39-year-old Williams.

Williams had won Wimbledon twice by the time Gauff was born, but it was the youngster who came out on top in the battle of the generations after making only eight unforced errors.

"This is the first time I ever cried after winning a match," Gauff told BBC Sport. "I never thought this would happen. I don't know how to explain it. I'm literally living my dream. Not many people get to say that.

"When we shook hands she told me congratulations and to keep going and good luck. I said, 'Thank you for everything you've done.' I wouldn't be here if it wasn't for her."

 

ALL TOO MUCH FOR OSAKA 

Osaka cut her press conference short after losing to an inspired Putintseva as the two-time major champion was "about to cry."

The Kazakh maintained her perfect record against the US Open and Australian Open champion with an inspired display, Osaka paying the price for 38 unforced errors.

The Japanese struggled on grass once again in a tournament where she has not been beyond the third round, losing to Putintseva for the third time last than two weeks after she got the better of her in Birmingham.

 

HALEP 'LUCKY' TO AVOID SERIOUS INJURY

Seventh seed Halep fell awkwardly during her encounter with Sasnovich on the same court where Gauff later stunned Williams.

The 2018 French Open champion needed treatment after overextending when she fell to the turf but was able to solider on with her left ankle strapped.

Romanian Halep said: "It's okay in this moment. But I need to do the treatment. I feel a little bit. I think it's a little bit stretched, the muscle behind the knee, and also the Achilles. Hopefully is nothing dangerous and I can recover until the next match [against compatriot Mihaela Buzarnescu]."

Second seed Naomi Osaka was the first major casualty at Wimbledon on day one, losing in straight sets to an inspired Yulia Putintseva.

Putintseva has never been beyond the second round at the All England Club, but stunned a nervy Osaka with a 7-6 (7-4) 6-2 victory on Monday.

The 39-ranked Putintseva won her previous two encounters with Osaka - most recently in Birmingham last month - and sent the world number two packing on Centre Court.

US and Australian Open champion Osaka racked up 38 unforced errors, struggling badly on grass once again at a grand slam where she has not been past round three.

Kazakh Putintseva capitalised on an uncertain display from Osaka, making just seven unforced errors and breaking three times to move into the second round.

While there were 34 winners from Osaka, the 21-year-old from Japan bowed out in an hour and 35 minutes at the All England Club. 

Osaka led 3-1 in the opening set, but Putintseva won the next three games and also stormed back from 3-1 down in the tie-break.

Putintseva allowed Osaka just a solitary break-point opportunity in the second set and won five games in a row to claim the biggest victory of her career, Osaka heading for the exit after netting a backhand.

Venus Williams will tackle record-breaking teenager Cori Gauff on Court One in an all-American battle of the generations at Wimbledon on Monday.

Five-time former SW19 champion Williams, 39, was drawn on Friday to face the youngest player to ever come through the women's singles qualifying rounds.

Gauff has cited Venus and sister Serena as inspirations behind her career, and the Florida-based 15-year-old has enjoyed success in junior grand slams.

The biggest test of her fledgling career is also rated by many as the most eagerly anticipated match of the opening day at the championships, however it misses out on Centre Court billing.

But a slot third on the second largest court means, with a likely late-afternoon start in London, it should attract a strong television audience both in the UK and the United States.


Novak Djokovic, as the defending men's champion, is handed the customary honour of getting action under way on Centre Court when he faces German veteran Philipp Kohlschreiber.

Japanese world number two Naomi Osaka plays Kazakhstan's Yulia Putintseva in the second match on the main show court, followed by British 30th seed Kyle Edmund's opener against Spaniard Jaume Munar.

Simona Halep and Alexander Zverev are handed Court One opportunities, with Stan Wawrinka, Eastbourne winner Karolina Pliskova, Stefanos Tsitsipas and Caroline Wozniacki on Court Two.

Play starts at 11:00 local time on all courts other than Centre and Court One, where action begins two hours later.

Last year's men's runner-up, Kevin Anderson of South Africa, starts out on Court Three when he plays France's Pierre-Hugues Herbert, the man who will partner Andy Murray in doubles later in the week.

Heather Watson, Britain's only other singles player in action on Monday, gets proceedings going on Court 12 when she plays 17-year-old American Caty McNally.

McNally has lost in each of the last three Wimbledon girls' doubles finals but won the 2018 US Open junior title in tandem with Gauff.

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