Caster Semenya stormed to a record-breaking Diamond League victory in Stanford with her future still up in the air.

Semenya clocked the fastest 800 metres time by a woman on American soil of one minute, 55.70 seconds on Sunday.

The South African was competing in the Diamond League for the first time since being cleared to run by the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (SFT), as she awaits the outcome of an appeal in her case against the IAAF.

The double Olympic 800m champion is challenging the IAAF's decision to introduce restrictions on testosterone levels in women competing at distances ranging from 400m to a mile.

Semenya appealed to the SFT after the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruled that the IAAF could implement the regulations.

The 28-year-old did not run in the last Diamond League event in Rabat, although she denied declining an offer to race after initially being denied entry before the SFT declared she is free to run without restriction until a verdict is reached.

Semenya took the bell in 57 seconds and powered away from the pack for a dominant victory ahead of Ajee Wilson, with Raevyn Rogers third.

Caster Semenya has criticised the IAAF for using her as a "human guinea pig" after the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) published its arbitral award following her case.

CAS ruled that the IAAF could implement a regulation that would require Semenya to take medication to lower her testosterone levels in order to compete against women in track events ranging from 400 metres to a mile.

The two-time Olympic 800m champion is awaiting the outcome of an appeal to the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland to overturn the ruling.

Yet the release of a redacted 163-page CAS award on Tuesday saw Semenya and her legal team provide a further scathing response.

"The IAAF used me in the past as a human guinea pig to experiment with how the medication they required me to take would affect my testosterone levels," she said in a statement.

"Even though the hormonal drugs made me feel constantly sick, the IAAF now wants to enforce even stricter thresholds with unknown health consequences.

"I will not allow the IAAF to use me and my body again. But I am concerned that other female athletes will feel compelled to let the IAAF drug them and test the effectiveness and negative health effects of different hormonal drugs. This cannot be allowed to happen."

The statement from Semenya's team highlighted the "extremely thin basis" of the regulations they felt were evident in the award, while criticising the IAAF's subsequent actions.

Semenya's team claimed "concerns and suggestions" from CAS regarding the scope of the regulations were ignored, while suggesting an IAAF statement regarding "chosen legal sex and/or gender identity" was "an insult to women like Caster who were born as women and have always been women".

"The IAAF's reactions after the award confirm that it does not deserve the trust that the majority of the CAS placed in it," Semenya's team said.

Meanwhile, the IAAF welcomed the publication of the CAS award, hoping it would "foster greater understanding" of the situation.

A statement read: "Having the arguments of all parties and the detailed findings of the CAS panel in the public domain will help to foster greater understanding of this complex issue and to demonstrate the balance it is necessary to draw between the right for any individual to choose their legal sex and/or gender identity, which the IAAF fully supports and respects, and the need for sport to create and defend a protected category for females, with eligibility for this category based on biology and not on legal sex or gender identity.

"Sport is one of only a few, narrow sectors of society in which biology has to trump gender identity to ensure fairness.

"To define the female category based on something other than biology would be category defeating and would deter many girls around the world from choosing competitive and elite sport after puberty.

"The IAAF considers that the DSD [differences of sex development] regulations are a necessary, reasonable and proportionate means of protecting fair and meaningful competition in elite female athletics, and the CAS agreed."

Caster Semenya has been invited to compete in the Diamond League meeting in Rabat this weekend after initially being denied entry.

Semenya was again cleared to compete without restriction on Thursday when the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (SFT) rejected an IAAF request to reimpose a new ruling limiting testosterone in female athletes.

The double Olympic 800 metres champion is challenging the IAAF's decision to introduce restrictions on testosterone levels in women competing at distances ranging from 400m to a mile.

Semenya should be free to run while she awaits an SFT verdict on her case, but was told on Tuesday that the president of the Moroccan Athletics Federation would not permit her to compete in Rabat on Sunday.

Race organisers backtracked after taking note of the SFT's refusal to reimpose the IAAF ruling.

A statement released by race organisers on Friday said: "After checking the situation of Caster Semenya in view of the decisions of the Swiss Federal Court, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport, the head of the sports centre and sports organisation of the international athletics meeting in Rabat, Mr. Alain Blondel, is happy to confirm her invitation to participate in the 800m race of the said meeting on Sunday 16 June 2019."

Semenya is also hoping to run in the Prefontaine Classic Diamond League meeting in California on June 30.

Caster Semenya remains free to compete without restriction after the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland (SFT) rejected an IAAF request to reimpose a new ruling limiting testosterone in female athletes.

The IAAF last week stated its intention to seek a "swift reversion" of the court order to allow Semenya to race in any event until the SFT comes to a decision over her case.

Two-time Olympic 800 metres champion Semenya is challenging the IAAF's decision to introduce restrictions on testosterone levels in female athletes competing at distances ranging from 400m to a mile.

Athletics' governing body was initially ordered to suspend its implementation of the regulations by the SFT earlier this month and that decision has now been upheld. 

Semenya may need to take hormone-suppressing medication, which she argues contravenes her human rights, if she loses her appeal and wishes to stay in athletics.

The 28-year-old on Tuesday stepped up to compete over 2,000m, dominating the field to triumph at the Meeting de Montreuil.

That victory came a day after she was selected in South Africa's preliminary squad for the IAAF World Championships in Doha.

Semenya's team said she was this week informed by the president of the Moroccan Athletics Federation that she would not be invited to compete in the 800m at the Diamond League meeting in Rabat on Sunday.

The three-time 800m world champion has sought to enter the Prefontaine Classic Diamond League meeting on June 30.

Caster Semenya had no problems stepping up to compete at 2000 metres on Tuesday, dominating the field to triumph at the Meeting de Montreuil.

In action a day after being selected in South Africa's preliminary squad for the IAAF World Championships, Semenya clocked a time of five minutes and 38.19 seconds at the event.

The two-time Olympic 800m champion was named in a 40-strong party while awaiting the outcome of an appeal to the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland in a bid to overturn a new IAAF ruling.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruled that the IAAF could implement a regulation to impose restrictions on testosterone levels in athletes competing in women's events at distances ranging from 400m to one mile.

Semenya has insisted she will not take hormone-suppressing medication in order to comply with the regulation if her appeal is unsuccessful, arguing the rule contravenes her human rights.

The Swiss Supreme Court has stated Semenya can compete without restrictions while it considers the case, though the IAAF is seeking a "swift reversion" to that order.

Semenya ruled out retiring after winning the 800m at the Diamond League event in Doha in May.

Caster Semenya has been included in South Africa's preliminary squad for the IAAF World Championships in Doha.

The two-time Olympic 800 metres champion is awaiting the outcome of an appeal to the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland in a bid to overturn a new IAAF ruling.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruled that the IAAF could implement a regulation that would require Semenya to take medication to lower her testosterone levels in order to compete against women in track events ranging from 400m to a mile.

The Swiss Supreme Court has stated that Semenya can compete without restrictions while it considers her appeal, although athletics' governing body is seeking a "swift reversion" of this order.

The final decision on the ruling will determine whether the 28-year-old is able to compete in the World Championships in September.

Athletics South Africa (ASA) has named Semenya among 40 athletes in its preliminary group.

However, ASA notes that Semenya's inclusion is still subject to the Swiss Supreme Court verdict.

Semenya ruled out retiring after winning the 800m at the Diamond League event in Doha last month, two days after the CAS ruling was announced.

The IAAF will seek a "swift reversion" of the court order that is set to temporarily allow Caster Semenya to compete without restrictions.

Tuesday's intervention by the IAAF, the governing body of world athletics, came in the wake of a ruling by the Swiss Federal Supreme Court (SFT) that was sought by the South African track star.

The two-time Olympic 800 metres champion is challenging the IAAF's decision to impose restrictions on testosterone levels in female athletes competing at distances ranging from 400m to one mile.

Semenya may need to take hormone-suppressing medication, which she argues contravenes her human rights, if she loses her appeal and wishes to stay in athletics.

She is challenging a Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruling that supported the IAAF's action. The IAAF has been given until June 25 to respond to her appeal.

The IAAF said Monday's Swiss ruling had been issued without its knowledge.

It said its experts were not given an opportunity to explain why rules surrounding athletes with disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) "should remain in place and applicable to all affected athletes while the appeal is pending".

Semenya, 28, has asked the SFT to set aside the decision in its entirety, however the IAAF appears unwilling to back down in any capacity.

In a statement, it said: "The IAAF fully respects each individual's personal dignity and supports the social movement to have people accepted in society based on their chosen legal sex and/or gender identity.

"However, the IAAF is convinced there are some contexts, sport being one of them, where biology has to trump identity.

"The IAAF also believes the right to participate in sport does not translate to a right to self-identify into a competition category or an event, or to insist on inclusion in a preferred event, or to win in a particular event, without regard to the legitimate rules of the sport or the criteria for entry.

"The IAAF will seek a swift reversion of the superprovisional order moving forwards so that the DSD regulations apply to all affected athletes in order (among other things) to avoid serious confusion amongst athletes and event organisers and to protect the integrity of the sport.

"In due course, the IAAF will defend its DSD regulations and the CAS award in the appeal proceedings before the SFT."

Semenya, who ruled out retiring after winning the 800m at the Diamond League event in Doha last month, two days after the CAS ruling was announced, welcomed the Swiss court's declaration on Monday.

She said: "I hope that following my appeal I will once again be able to run free."

Dorothee Schramm, Swiss counsel for Semenya, said on Monday: "This is an important case that will have fundamental implications for the human rights of female athletes."

Caster Semenya will be allowed to compete without restriction until the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland has passed judgement on a new IAAF ruling.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruled that the IAAF could implement a regulation that would require Semenya to take medication to lower her testosterone levels in order to compete against women in track events ranging from 400m to a mile.

However, the two-time Olympic 800 metres champion has continued to challenge the ruling and lodged an appeal in Switzerland last week.

The 28-year-old asked the Swiss Federal Supreme Court to set aside the decision in its entirety.

It has now been confirmed that the IAAF must suspend its implementation of the regulations until the Swiss Supreme Court, which will receive submissions from the body, has made a ruling.

Semenya, who ruled out retiring after winning the 800m at the Diamond League event in Doha last month, two days after the CAS ruling was announced, will be able to compete for the time being.

She said: "I am thankful to the Swiss judges for this decision. I hope that following my appeal I will once again be able to run free."

Dorothee Schramm, Swiss counsel for Semenya, said: "The Swiss Supreme Court has granted welcome temporary protection to Caster Semenya. This is an important case that will have fundamental implications for the human rights of female athletes."

Caster Semenya has lodged an appeal to the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland, challenging the Court of Arbitration for Sport's (CAS) verdict in her case against the IAAF.

The two-time Olympic 800 metres champion challenged a new IAAF ruling that will require her to take medication to lower her testosterone levels in order to compete against women in track events ranging from 400m to a mile.

Semenya ruled out retiring after winning the 800m at the Diamond League event in Doha, just two days after the CAS ruling was announced at the start of this month.

The new regulation has since been implemented and Semenya has now launched a fresh appeal amid uncertainty over her future in the sport.

In a widely reported statement, Semenya said: "The IAAF will not drug me or stop me from being who I am."

The 28-year-old will ask the Swiss Federal Supreme Court to set aside the decision in its entirety. 

She believes the CAS ruling in favour of athletics' governing body "condones their requirements for unnecessary and unwanted hormonal drug interventions on female athletes".

Caster Semenya has distanced herself from suggestions she will retire and has no plans to take medication to lower her testosterone levels. 

Semenya excelled to claim a dominant win in the season-opening Diamond League 800 metres women's race in Doha on Friday, just two days after the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) controversially ruled against the South African's appeal over the IAAF's testosterone regulations in a landmark legal case.  

The governing body will require Semenya to take medication that reduces testosterone levels in order to compete in track events ranging from 400m to a mile from May 8.  

A cryptic tweet by Semenya on Thursday led to speculation the two-time 800m Olympic champion may retire, but, speaking to BBC Sport after the victory in Qatar, the 28-year-old ruled out that possibility.  

"I'm never going anywhere," she said. "At the end of the day, it's all about believing. 

"It's up to God. God has decided my career and he will end my career, so no human can stop me from running. 

"I understand there's been a lot of controversy but that does not control anything. 

"Actions speak louder than words. When you're a great champion you always deliver. 

"With me, life has been simple. I'm just here to deliver for the people who love and support me. 

"I'm enjoying each and every moment of my life, maybe because I have the love I need from my people. 

"It's all about confusing your enemies. If people create you as an enemy you keep it like that. 

"We're doing it for the next generation, we want to inspire them. I cannot talk about the case, what I can talk about is the running. Some things I cannot control. I believe in my legal team. They will do their best to get me back on the track." 

When asked by Sportsmail if she planned to take the medication, Semenya replied "Hell no," but clarified she still intends to compete in the 800m. 

"With this situation, you can never tell the future," she added. 

"How the hell am I going to retire when I'm 28? I still feel young, energetic. I still have 10 years or more in athletics, it doesn't matter how I'm going to do it. What matters is I'll still be here." 

British rival Lynsey Sharp revealed she has received death threats for previously speaking out about the challenges of competing against Semenya. 

"I've known Caster since 2008, it's something I've been familiar with over the past 11 years," she said in quotes reported by BBC Sport. 

"It's not a decision that's been taken lightly. No one benefits from this situation – of course she doesn't benefit, but it's not me versus her, it's not us versus them. 

"I've had death threats. I've had threats against my family and that's not a position I want to be in. It's really unfortunate the way it's played out. 

"It's good that there has been some sort of solution, but no-one is going to agree, unfortunately. 

"By no means am I over the moon about this, it's just been a long 11 years for everyone." 

Caster Semenya dominated the 800 metres women's race at the season-opening Diamond League meeting in Doha, amid speculation she could retire after losing her case against the IAAF. 

The South African powered to a world-leading and meet-record time of one minute and 54.98 seconds after a superb second lap. 

Semenya put clear daylight between herself and the chasing pack, with Francine Niyonsaba and Ajee Wilson coming second and third respectively.  

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Wednesday dismissed the two-time 800m Olympic champion's appeal against the IAAF's testosterone regulations in a landmark legal case. 

The IAAF's ruling will require Semenya to take medication to reduce testosterone levels in order to compete in track events ranging from 400m to a mile. 

Initially, Semenya stated that she will "rise above and continue to inspire young women and athletes in South Africa and around the world" in response to the CAS decision. 

However, a cryptic tweet on Friday that included the quote, "Knowing when to walk away is wisdom. Being able to is courage. Walking away with your head held high is dignity" prompted speculation Semenya might retire, leading to an outpouring of support from fans urging her not to do so. 

"For me, this is life. In life, it's hard sometimes, sometimes it's good, but there's nothing that can stop me living in this world," the 28-year-old said after the race, as quoted by the Independent. 

"I think it’s all about keeping believing. If kids look up to you, you must keep doing what’s best for them.  

"This is no longer about us, it’s about the future, the next generation. So we keep inspiring them and then life goes on." 

An appeal can be made against the CAS decision to the Swiss Federal Tribunal within 30 days of the ruling. The IAAF's rules are set to come into effect on May 8. 

Noted sports attorney Emir Crowne has declared that the Court of Arbitration for Sport’s (CAS) ruling against two-time Olympic champion Caster Semenya is a “dangerous intrusion into the personal autonomy and bodily integrity for any sporting body to regulate the natural physiology and biochemistry of an athlete.”

He is of the view that it should be “struck down.”

Crowne, who sits on International Panel of Arbitrators and Mediators, Sport Resolutions, was expressing his personal views on the matter after the CAS Arbitration Panel unanimously found the IAAF Eligibility Regulations for Female Classification (Athletes with Differences of Sex Development) (the “DSD Regulations”) to be discriminatory.

However, the panel split 2-1 in finding that “such discrimination is a necessary, reasonable and proportionate means of achieving the IAAF’s aim of preserving the integrity of female athletics…”.

Put simply, Dr Crowne said, the DSD Regulations mandate that female athletes with naturally elevated levels of testosterone reduce their testosterone level to less than five nanomoles per litre. The reduction, according to the IAAF, can be achieved through oral medication.

“Calling it a ‘slippery slope’ would be too kind. It is a sharp cliff,” Dr Crowne said.

“If we start with regulating women’s testosterone, do we then move on to athletes with naturally elevated creatine levels or red blood cell counts? Do we pass a rule banning children with scoliosis from competing due to health and safety concerns?

“I’m certain that the IAAF, or any other well-meaning sporting body, could find “scientific” evidence to demonstrate the possible harm to a child’s development if they were allowed to train and compete with scoliosis. It would all be done in “good faith” with the commendable goal of protecting the rights of the child.”

He suggested that there could even elements of racial bias in the IAAF’s policy that Semenya challenged.

“Like rule changes in any sport (cricket being a notable example), the DSD regulations – which only apply to female athletes competing in the 400m to 1-mile events at international competitions – are presented as being ‘formally’ neutral. Substantively, however, the regulations target Caster Semenya and Francine Niyonsaba: two black women.”

“So where does this leave us?” he asked.

“Despite its laudatory name, the “Court” of Arbitration for Sport is not a Court. It is a private arbitration body.

“Decisions of CAS are appealable to the Swiss Federal Tribunal. Appeals are generally limited to breaches of procedural fairness, natural justice or public policy (which includes a prohibition against discrimination). That prohibition (against discrimination) is said to be limited to instances involving “sex, race, health condition, sexual preference, religion, nationality or political opinions”. The DSD Regulations directly discriminate on the basis of health condition, and substantively discriminate on the basis of sex and race. If appealed, I am unsure how such regulations could be upheld.”

In sum, Dr. Crowne reasoned, the DSD Regulations directly discriminate on the basis of health, indirectly discriminate on the basis of sex, indirectly discriminate on the basis of race and directly intrude into an athlete’s life, liberty and security of the person.

“It is a terrible policy tainted with illegality that must be struck down,” he concluded.

Caster Semenya is due to compete in the Diamond League on Friday despite hinting at retirement after losing her case against the IAAF.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Wednesday dismissed the two-time 800 metre Olympic champion's appeal against the IAAF's testosterone regulations in a landmark legal case.

Semenya challenged a new ruling which will require her to reduce her testosterone levels by taking medication in order to compete in distances up to a mile.

The regulations will come into force next Wednesday, so South African Semenya is still able to run in Doha two days after a verdict which put her career in doubt.

Semenya vowed that the CAS decision will not hold her back and she will "rise above and continue to inspire young women and athletes in South Africa and around the world".

Yet the 28-year-old prompted speculation over her future with a social media post on Thursday.

She tweeted: "Knowing when to walk away is wisdom. Being able to is courage. Walking away with your head held high is dignity."

The South African government says it will study the judgment of the landmark legal case against the IAAF and its testosterone regulations before planning a route forward.

Caster Semenya and Athletics South Africa (ASA), backed by the government, had a request for arbitration concerning the IAAF's eligibility rules for athletes with differences of sex development (DSD) dismissed by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Wednesday.

The regulations require DSD athletes, such as Semenya, with naturally occurring high levels of testosterone to lower them in order to compete in women's track events from 400m to a mile.

Although a CAS panel did consider the regulations to be "discriminatory", it ruled by majority that "such discrimination is a necessary, reasonable and proportionate means of achieving the IAAF's aim of preserving the integrity of female athletics".

The IAAF's DSD regulations, which were set to come into effect last November but were suspended pending the outcome of the CAS procedures, are now due to become active from May 8.

This means Semenya will be required to take medication to reduce her testosterone levels in order to defend her 800m title in September's World Championships in Doha.

However, the ruling, which referenced "some serious concerns as to the future practical applications of these DSD regulations", may be appealed at the Swiss Federal Tribunal within 30 days.

A statement from South Africa's minister of sport and recreation Tokozile Xasa described the government's disappointment but offered Semenya encouragement and said it would now take time to consider the judgment.

"Naturally, we are disappointed with the judgment," Xasa said. "However, we have directed ASA to request a copy of the full judgment. We will study the judgment, consider it and determine a way forward.

"As the South African government, we have always maintained that these regulations trample on the human rights and dignity of Caster Semenya and other women athletes.

"We will comment further after studying the full judgment."

Xasa thanked the South African public for their support and added to Semenya: "You remain our golden girl.

"What you have done for our people and girls is enormous. You have flown our flag high, you have united a nation and inspired a rural girl. For that, we thank you, Mokgadi."

She also assured that both the government and ASA would keep pushing to have the regulations declared invalid and void.

"ASA should continue to lobby other national athletics associations in other jurisdictions to internally oppose these regulations," Xasa said.

"We, too, in government will continue to lobby through other international organsations on our opposition to these regulations and continue to put the necessary pressure on the IAAF to see the impact of these regulations on global human rights tenets and frameworks."

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