Usain Bolt and girlfriend Kasi Bennett welcome twins St Leo and Thunder Bolt

By June 20, 2021

The undisputed king of the track Usain Bolt and his queen Kasi Bennett have welcomed two new additions to the family.

On Father’s Day, barely a year after the birth of their daughter Olympia Lightning Bolt, the pair have released the first images of their newborn twins Saint Leo Bolt and Thunder Bolt.

Bolt posted the family portrait with his two newly minted offspring for his 10 million followers on Instagram while Bennett showed off her offspring to her more than 380,000 followers. Under the images, she posted “Happy Father’s Day to my forever love! @usainbolt. You are the rock of this family and the greatest daddy to our little ones. We love you world without end.”

Meanwhile, Bolt received thousands of congratulatory messages from thousands of fans including Jamaica Member of Parliament and former Miss World, Lisa Hanna, two-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce, 200m World Champion Dina Asher-Smith and Digicel, for whom the world-record holder is an ambassador.

Bolt’s daughter Olympia was born in May 2020.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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