Elaine and Shelly beware! Richardson now favourite for Olympic 100/200m glory - Boldon

By April 11, 2021

Track and field coach and broadcaster Ato Boldon believes the USA’s Sha’ Carri Richardson is now favoured to break Jamaica’s stranglehold on the Olympic 100m title this summer, following her jaw-dropping 100m run at the Miramar South Florida Invitational on Saturday.

The 21-year-old Richardson, who won the NCAA National title in 2019 in 10.75, blazed to a world-leading time of 10.72 while easing up more than 10 metres from the finish line. The performance sent shockwaves across the athletics fraternity and threw the gauntlet down to defending champion Elaine Thompson-Herah and 2008 and 2012 champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, who won an unprecedented fourth world title in Doha two seasons ago.

Boldon thinks that the era of Jamaican dominance in the blue-riband event could be coming to an end.

“I’ve seen all I need to see from Sha’Carri yesterday. She’s the favourite no matter what and the whole industry knows it, track agents, shoe executives from all countries and other industry folks were saying as much post-meet yesterday,” said Boldon, who broadcasted from the meet held at the Ansin Stadium.

“Favorites don’t always win the Olympics but I think she will run 10.6 before the Olympic trials happen in June, maybe in Oregon if it’s not too cold, maybe at Mt Sac on May 9.

“Sha’ Carri is the 100/200 gold medal favourite for the Tokyo Olympics. Period,” Boldon said of the upstart American, who ran a personal best 22.00 at Montverde, Florida, in August last year.

The 21-year-old American is now the fifth-fastest woman in history as only Fraser-Pryce, Thompson-Herah (10.70), Marion Jones (10.65), Carmelita Jeter (10.64) and Florence Griffith-Joyner (10.49) have run faster.

Finishing second in the race was the USA’s Javianne Oliver, who clocked 11.07 while Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte was third in 11.16. Natasha Morrison crossed the finish line fourth in 11.22.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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