Max Kellerman's track comments misinformed - Donovan Bailey

By September 06, 2019

Former 100m world record holder Donovan Bailey has joined the throng of track and field greats who have come out against ESPN Max Kellerman who said track and field athletes are those who have failed at American football and basketball.

Speaking on ESPN's First Take on Monday, Kellerman, commenting on who was the most electric athlete in history, disrespected track and field star Usain Bolt.

It can't be Tiger Woods, it can't be Usain Bolt, it's only a sport by a very broad definition. It really only tests your fast twitches, right? That's an athletic ability but it's only one specific kind. We don't know his manual dexterity, we don't know his ability to think on the fly, etcetera. Which is why track and field stars are usually failed [American] football and basketball players.”

In response, track and field legends Carl Lewis and Bolt chided the former boxing analyst.

Bailey, the 1995 World and 1996 Olympic champion, weighed in on Kellerman’s comments as well.

“Max Kellerman is extremely ill-informed and actually doesn’t really understand that the base of every single professional athlete, those people that he has mentioned – baseball, basketball, football – the base of that is track and field, so the greatest athletes in the world are track and field athletes and he doesn’t really understand that. He is quite ill-informed,” said Bailey, the former world record holder, who will be an analyst on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation during the World Championships in Doha later this month.

Track and field greats Usain Bolt and Carl Lewis, as well as rising US star Matt Boling have all taken Kellerman to task over his comments.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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