IAAF clears president Coe of misleading MPs

By Sports Desk April 11, 2019

Sebastian Coe has been cleared of misleading MPs over when he was first made aware of doping and corruption allegations by an IAAF investigation.

The IAAF's ethics board began a probe into its president in September 2018 following claims by a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee report that answers provided by Coe to questions provided in 2015 were "misleading".

Coe denied having misled the committee and a report published by the ethics board on Thursday found "there is no evidence such that there is any realistic prospect that any disciplinary case could be established that Lord Coe intentionally misled the Parliamentary Committee."

The investigation against the former middle-distance runner centred on an e-mail sent to Coe by ex-10,000 metre world-record holder David Bedford with regards to the bribery case of Russian marathon runner Liliya Shobukhova. 

Coe confirmed he had received an e-mail but it had been forwarded on to the IAAF ethics board via his personal assistant, who supported his version.

The report added: "Coe's evidence is that his personal assistant forwarded the email with its attachments to the Chairperson of the Ethics Board and that he [Lord Coe] did not read the attachments.

"The investigation did not find any evidence inconsistent with that position."

A widely reported statement from Coe read: "I want to thank the ethics board for all the work they do.

"When I became President of the IAAF, I promised greater transparency and integrity. I hope this demonstrates that no-one is above the rules and everyone in the sport is subject to the same scrutiny."

 

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