Kemba Nelson recaps 'incredible season' after 10.90s 100m run at NCAA Championships Saturday

By June 14, 2021
Kemba Nelson Kemba Nelson University of Oregon

Kemba Nelson has characterized her first season competing on the American collegiate circuit as ‘incredible’ after her fourth-place finish in the 100m at the NCAA Division I Outdoor season that concluded in Eugene, Oregon on Saturday.

Nelson, who turned 21, in February, spent her first two years of college at the University of Technology in Kingston, Jamaica, before making the move to the University of Oregon last December.

After a solid indoor season during which she was crowned national 60m champion, Nelson capped off her year with a 10.90s run that saw her finish behind Cambrea Sturgis 10.74, Twanisha Terry 10.79 and Tamara Clarke 10.88. The trailing wind was 2.2m/s but Nelson had run a wind-legal 10.98 in the preliminary rounds the week before.

One would have thought that finishing out of the top three would have been a disappointment for the young Jamaican, especially after she was involved in a mishap that ended up with a dropped baton in the 4x100m relay.

However, for Nelson, when one considers what she endured before ending up at Oregon, the just-concluded season was not such a bad one after all.

“A year ago, I left NACAC with a messed up Achilles and Pan Am in a wheelchair with a Grade 2 hamstring tear. Six months later, I strained my other hamstring and so I decided to leave my previous camp four months after this incident,” she said in her posts on social media on Sunday.

“Fast forward six months into my collegiate career. I broke the Indoor Collegiate Record, Meet Record, School Record, 5th Jamaican all-time over 60m, rank 2nd in the world over 60m. Outdoor season with dipping 4 times under 11 seconds. 4th fastest collegiate over 100m in the NCAA. And oh yeah, I’m all-American. Incredible season!”

Nelson will now rest up before flying to Jamaica to see if her year can get even better by earning a spot on Jamaica’s team to the Tokyo, Olympics in July.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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