'I was born in the wrong time' - Blake reflects on impact of Bolt shadow

By Sports Desk December 04, 2019
Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake. Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake.

 Jamaican sprinter Yohan Blake believes he has suffered from competing in the same era as compatriot and athletics great Usain Bolt.

The 29-year-old Blake has recorded some stunning achievements of his own on the track, in a career that has also been hampered by injury.  His best times over the 100m (9.69) and 200m (19.26) are the second-fastest ever recorded over the distances.  Bolt still holds both world records.

In addition, Blake claimed the gold medal at the 2011 Daegu World Championship and silver medals in both the 100m and 200m at the 2012 London Olympic Games.  On both occasions, the sprinter finished behind his illustrious teammate Bolt.  Once thought as the natural successor to the athletics sprint throne, Blake then suffered major hamstring injuries in both the 2013 and 2014 seasons.  While insisting that he is satisfied with what he has achieved in the sport to date,  Blake believes things could have been different had he been born in another era.

"I would be the fastest man in everything. I feel like I was born in a wrong time. But nevertheless, I am happy with what I have achieved,” Blake told reporters recently.

“It would be hard to top Usain because it was his time and it was hard to compete against him. The first time I beat him in Kingston, I had to work day and night to do it."

Heading into the 2012 Olympics Blake defeated Bolt over both the 100m and 200m at the Jamaica National trials but never managed to repeat the feat.

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    But Britney, who says her times have steadily been getting stronger, believes she has beaten both - and by a considerable margin, too.

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    "Usually I run 6 or 7. My first try was 9. And now I did it, whoop!!!!! 100-metre dash!!!!!"

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  • Coronavirus: Olympics swansong denied or delayed? Biles, Felix, Federer and other stars left in limbo Coronavirus: Olympics swansong denied or delayed? Biles, Felix, Federer and other stars left in limbo

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    ALLYSON FELIX (ATHLETICS)

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    ROGER FEDERER (TENNIS)

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    ALISTAIR BROWNLEE (TRIATHLON)

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