Williams on course for Carifta sprint double after booking spot in 200m final

By Sports Desk April 21, 2019
Jamaica's Briana Williams. Jamaica's Briana Williams.

Budding Jamaica sprint star Briana Williams stayed on course for a sprint double at the 2019 Carifta Games after progressing easily from the preliminary round of the U-20 200m on Sunday.

Competing in heat 1, Williams motored away from the field to stop the clock at 23.38, well ahead of second place Beyonce Defreitas (23.91) of the British Virgin Islands.  Third place Deshana Skeete (23.92) of Guyana was also through to the next round after qualifying as one of the fastest losers.

William’s compatriot Joanne Reid was also safely through to the final after claiming top spot in heat 2.  Reid clocked 23.61 to claim first place, comfortably ahead of Alya Stanisclaus who was second in 23.72.  Kayon Stubbs of the Bahamas was third in 24.07 but also qualified as one of the fastest losers.

Bahamas’ Jaida Knowles triumphed in heat 3 after stopping the clock in 23.44, with Akila Lewis second in 24.03.  The final of the event will take place at 8:30 pm on Sunday night.  Williams will head into the event with the fastest time.

 

 

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    “I’m feeling good. Before the race, we had an idea of how we wanted the race to go and it didn't go as planned so I’m happy for the win and ready to move on to the next.”

     

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    Boldon, the Trinidad and Tobago Olympic bronze medalist, was in complete agreement.  Like Williams, Boldon could also have represented Jamaica as he was born in Port of Spain to a Jamaican mother.

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    Williams, the World U-20 sprint double Champion, will represent Jamaica at the Doha World Championships later this year.   

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