Lawrence sets new discus national record

By Sports Desk April 21, 2019
Jamaica thrower Shadae Lawrence. Jamaica thrower Shadae Lawrence.

Jamaica thrower Shadae Lawrence set a new national record in the women’s discus after a strong showing at the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday.

Lawrence, a senior at Colorado State University, threw a distance of 63.89 in the fourth round.  The mark was enough to keep the Jamaican in the lead until the final round where Brazilian Fernanda Martins threw 64.16m to claim the top spot.  Another Jamaica, Shanice Love, claimed third spot with a fifth-round haul of 61.16m.

Love’s new mark erased the previous best of 62.73m set by Kellion Knibb two years ago.  Lawrence’s mark was also a record for CSU and the top collegiate mark in the country this year.

The thrower broke the school record twice on Saturday, first breaking the CSU record at the Beach Invitational with a toss of 61.80m shattering the previous record held by Shelly Greathouse-Borman since 1999, and garnered a second-place finish in a strong national field.

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